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ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1975-1976 



COMMON ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1975 — 1976 

FALL QUARTER 

September 22-26 Orientation and Registration 

September 29 Beginning of Classes 

November 27-30 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 1-5 Registration for the Winter Quarter 

December 13 Fall Quarter Ends 

December 14 - January 4, 1976 Christmas Recess 



WINTER QUARTER 

January 5, 1976 Classes begin (Late Registration) 

February 23-27 Registration for the Spring Quarter 

March 19 Winter Quarter Ends 

March 20-28 Spring Recess 



SPRING QUARTER 

March 29 Classes Begin (Late Registration) 

April 4-10 Cluster World Mission Institute 

April 16-18 Easter Recess 

June 4 Spring Quarter Ends (BTS, CTU, DEAN, JSTC, MTS) 

June 9 Spring Quarter Ends (LSTC) 

June 11 Spring Quarter Ends (CTS, M/L, NBTS) 





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JANUARY 

1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 12131415 1617 
1819202122 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 

12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 91011 121314 
151617181920 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 


MARCH 

1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 91011 1213 
14151617181920 
2122 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 3031 


APRIL 

1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 121314 151617 
18 19 20 2122 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
91011 12131415 
161718 19202122 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
3031 


JUNE 

12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 91011 12 
13141516171819 
20 2122 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


JULY 

1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 121314151617 
18 19202122 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


AUGUST 

12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 91011 121314 
15161718192021 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 3031 


SEPTEMBER 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 91011 
12131415161718 
19 20 2122 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


OCTOBER ^ 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
101112 13141516 
17 1819202122 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


NOVEMBER 

12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 91011 1213 
14151617181920 
2122 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


DECEMBER 

5 6 7 8 -9 1011 
12131415161718 
19 20 2122 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 





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JANUARY 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 91011 
12131415161718 
19 20 2122 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9101112131415 
16171819202122 
23 24 25 26 27 28 


MARCH , 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
91011 12131415 
16171819202122 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


APRIL 

12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 91011 12 
1314151617 1819 
20 2122 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


MAY 

1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 121314151617 
18 19 20 2122 23 24 
25 262728 29 3031 


JUNE 

15161718192021 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


JULY 

12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 91011 12 
13141516171819 
20 2122 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


AUGUST J 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
1011 1213141516 
171819202122 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


SEPTEMBER 

12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 91011 1213 
14151617181920 
2122 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


OCTOBER 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 91011 
12131415161718 
19 20 2122 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


NOVEMBER , 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9101112131415 
16171819202122 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


DECEMBER 

12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 91011 1213 
14 15161718 1920 
2122 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Foreword 2 

Cluster Institutions 3 

Cluster Areas of Concentration 10 

Personal Transformation 12 

Social Transformation 14 

Celebration 16 

Cross-Cultural Communication 19 

Interpretation and Communication: Teaching 21 

Cluster Courses of Cooperative Instruction 25 

Cluster Day Courses 28 

Cluster Black Studies 30 

Cluster Women's Issues 33 

Courses of Study 36 

Biblical Studies 36 

Old Testament 36 

New Testament 39 

Biblical Languages 45 

Jewish Studies 46 

Historical Studies 46 

Theological Studies 52 

Ethical Studies 63 

World Mission Studies 68 

Ministerial Studies 69 

Foundations and Functions of Ministry 69 

Pastoral Care and Spiritual Direction 71 

Liturgy and Worship 11 

Preaching and Communications 1% 

Religious Education 80 

Organization and Administration 83 

Church and Community 84 

Canon Law 84 

Theological Librarianship %b 

Supervised Ministry %5 

Cluster Personnel 90 

Faculty and Executive Officers 90 

Librarians 104 

Announcements 106 

Cluster Library Services 106 

Cluster World Mission Institute 107 

Cluster Theological Language Courses 107 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science 108 

Center for Studies in Religious Education 109 

Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial Society Ill 

Chicago Theological Institute 114 

Chicago Area Colleges and Universities 114 



FOREWORD 

The nine member institutions of the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 
continue to forge and strengthen common bonds of interdependence as they pre- 
pare persons for pastoral and prophetic ministries to the tragic and heroic dimen- 
sions of contemporary existence in the light of Judeo-Christian faith. Such inter- 
dependence manifests itself in a variety of exciting and rewarding possibilities 
for theological education in a setting in which the resources of one of the world's 
great metropolitan areas can be creatively brought to bear upon urban, suburban, 
and rural ministries. 

Cooperative educational developments designed to enhance the personal and 
professional growth of students are fostered through a variety of structures and 
processes. 

From the outset all Cluster schools have extended reciprocal tuition-free cross- 
registration privileges for course work and, in certain instances, supervised min- 
istry placements ~ a privilege which some 750 students exercised last year. The 
exercise of cross-registration privileges within Cluster schools is facilitated by the 
adoption of common academic calendars and class schedules, and by the designa- 
tion of certain "Cluster Day" courses whose weekly sessions rotate from campus to 
campus in order to be more easily accessible to students in all Cluster schools. 
Beginning this year, most Cluster students will also have access to similar tuition- 
free cross-registration privileges in courses of the five seminaries which comprise 
the Chicago Theological Institute. 

The Cluster's pioneering endeavors in developing intensive, interdisciplinary, 
and interconfessional Areas of Concentration in Personal Transformation, Social 
Transformation, Celebration, and Cross-Cultural Communication have met with 
overwhelmingly enthusiastic student response during the two years since their 
inception. Based on such response, a new Area of Concentration, Interpretation 
and Communication: Teaching, is offered this year, and two additional Concen- 
trations in Preaching and in Media and the Arts are in the early stages of design. 

Blacks and women will enjoy significantly expanded curricular offerings and 
faculty representation. These important advances are occasioned by the schools' 
ongoing development of new courses and employment of new personnel, and by 
the Cluster's continuing practice of jointly employing women and Black faculty 
to complement the staffs of the several schools. 

The Cluster will break new ground in the area of supervised ministry through 
its sponsorship of a Conference on Supervision and Theological Reflection on 
September 17-19. It is anticipated that the event, which is planned to assist super- 
visors and seminarians enhance the values of internships and concurrent field 
placements, will be the first of similar joint enterprises undertaken in years to 
come. 

These and other vital signs augur well for sustained accomplishments in the 
Cluster's quest for excellence in theological education. In addition to availing 
themselves of the rich educational opportunities which derive from such a quest, 
students are encouraged to become co-creators in shaping the Cluster's enduring 
pursuit of excellence. 

Donald F. Williams 

Acting Executive Coordinator 



CLUSTER INSTITUTIONS 

CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

The Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools is an ecumenical association of six 
Protestant and three Roman Catholic seminaries. While preserving their legal 
autonomy and denominational integrity, the schools espouse common commit- 
ments to provide graduate professional education of the highest order in equip- 
ping men and women for leadership as ministers, priests, and laypersons in serving 
the world and the church. 

Such common commitments involve educational, theological, and financial 
purposes. Educationally, the Cluster reflects the purpose of its member schools 
to maximize the scope and depth of excellence in theological preparation made 
possible by the coordinated sharing and development of resources such as facul- 
ties, libraries, auxiliary services, physical plants, and funds for new and ongoing 
programs. Theologically, the Cluster reflects the purpose of its member schools 
to prepare leaders whose identities are both rooted in their respective confessional 
and ecclesial traditions and informed by appreciation of the richness of ecumeni- 
cal and interfaith perceptions of divine concern for the world. Financially, the 
Cluster reflects the purpose of its member schools to obtain the best educational 
return on the investment of funds entrusted to their stewardship by realizing 
fiscal economies through consolidated institutional purchasing and through co- 
ordinated elimination of unnecessary duplication of resources. 

The Cluster was organized in 1970 and incorporated as a not-for-profit corpora- 
tion in 1971. Of its eight founding institutions, five Protestant schools represented 
a corresponding number of denominations and three Roman Catholic schools 
represented or officially served eight religious communities and one diocese. Since 
the Cluster's formation, these founding schools have officially been joined by eight 
additional Roman Catholic religious communities and by another Protestant semi- 
nary. Jewish presence and studies have been provided during these years through 
cooperating institutions. 

Six of the nine member schools are grouped closely together on the south side of 
Chicago adjacent to the University of Chicago. Two are located on contiguous 
campuses in west suburban Oak Brook, and one is situated in the southwest sub- 
urb of Lemont. 

The Cluster's diverse and extensive networks of resources for theological educa- 
tion are unparalleled in the Midwest and are among the most outstanding in North 
America. The nine Cluster schools offer a variety of academic and professional 
degrees at the master's and doctoral levels, and programs of continuing education 
for clergy and laity. The almost 1,400 Cluster students have access to resources 
such as those represented by 175 faculty (of whom 130 are full-time), including 
6 Blacks and 18 women; more than 450 courses annually; library collections of 
some 775,000 volumes and 1,600 currently-received periodicals; contemporary 
electronic media equipment (including portable and studio video capabilities) 
and modern language lab facilities; and three centers for specialized research and 
ministry dealing, respectively, with religion and science, religious education, and 
the church and urban-industrial society. 

Beyond the resources of the Cluster are those of six other Chicago-area theo- 
logical schools upon which Cluster students may draw, together with the vast 
resources of numerous institutions of higher learning and innumerable organiza- 
tions and agencies of a religious, humanitarian, cultural or scientific character in 
and about the metropolitan environs. 



Officers 
Chairman 
Vice-Chairman 
Treasurer 
Secretary 



Cluster Common Council 

C. Shelby Rooks (Chicago Theological Seminary) 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (Catholic Theological Union) 

Alfred M. Palfi (Chicago Theological Seminary) 

Donald F. Williams (Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools) 



Representatives of Member Institutions 
Bethany Theological Seminary 
Catholic Theological Union John T, 



Paul M. Robinson, 
Pawlikowski, O.S.M., 



Chicago Theological Seminary C. Shelby Rooks, 

DeAndreis Seminary Anthony J. Falanga, CM., Nicholas 

Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago James Hennesey, 



Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Representative of Business Managers 



Cluster Administrative Staff 



Warren F. Groff 
Gilbert Ostdiek, 
O.F.M. 
Perry D. LeFevre 
E. Persich, CM. 
S.J., William G. 
Guindon, S.J. 
Wesley J. Fuerst 
Lewis S. Mudge 
John C Godbey 
William R. Myers, Robert P. Meye 

John A. Eichelberger 

(Bethany Theological Seminary) 

(See below) 



Walter F. Wolbrecht 
Jack L. Stotts. 



Cluster Administrative Staff 



Acting Executive Coordinator 

Assistant to the Executive Coordinator 
Library Coordinator 

Assistant to the Library Coordinator 

Library Courier 
Black Studies Coordinator 
Women's Issues Coordinator 
International Programs Coordinator 
Student Affairs Coordinator 
Cooperative Purchasing Coordinator 

Cluster Faculty and Staff Convenors 



Donald F. Williams 

To Be Named 

Albert E. Hurd 

Kevin R. Bowers 

Donald E. Rothweiler 

Albert E. Pero 

Ellen L. Babinsky 

Charles V. Olson 

Joseph W. Lloyd 

Bertil O. Erikson 



Old Testament 

New Testament 

Church History 

Theology 

Ethics 

World Mission 

Pastoral Care 

Liturgy and Worship 

Preaching and Commun 

Religious Education 

Supervised Ministry 

Continuing Education 

Librarians 

Business Managers 

Development Directors 



Wesley J. Fuerst, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

Adela Y. Collins, McCormick Theological Seminary 

J. Patout Burns, S.J., Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 

John E. Burkhart, McCormick Theological Seminary 

Robert Benne, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

V. Bruce Rigdon, McCormick Theological Seminary 

Arthur L. Foster, Chicago Theological Seminary 

LeRoy E. Kennel, Bethany Theological Seminary 

ications Oscar J. Miller, CM., DeAndreis Seminary 

E. Alfred Jenkins, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Lynn R. Buzzard, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Barbara B. Zikmund, Chicago Theological Seminary 

Albert E. Hurd, Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 

John A. Eichelberger, Bethany Theological Seminary 

Luther R. Livingston, Lutheran School of 

Theology at Chicago 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Bethany education is shaped by concerns for such areas as peace, discipleship, 
true piety, and servanthood; seeks to provide a community of scholarship and 
faith where insistence upon academic excellence is balanced by concern for per- 
sonal growth. Curricular innovations include colloquium groupings oriented to- 
ward the contexts of ministry and a credit-noncredit plan of grading. 




President 


Paul M. Robinson 


Dean 


Warren F. Groff 


Administrative Assistant to Doctor 




of Ministry Program, Registrar 


Carole Loats 


Treasurer and Business Manager 


John A. Eichelberger 


Degree Programs : 


Time Beyond A.B. 


Name of Degree 


Normally Required 


M.A.Th. 


2 years 


M.Div. 


3 years 


D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite)* 


9 years 


Butterfield and Meyers Roads 


Oak Brook, Illinois 60521 


(312) 620-2200 





CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 



Catholic Theological Union is a collaborative venture serving thirteen religious 
orders. Autonomous corporation. Ecumenical and university thrust in complex 
of southside Chicago institutions. Emphasis on preparation for ministry, hence 
flexible academic pattern augmented by strong field education program. Pro- 
grams open to all serious students, men and women. 
Acting President John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Vice President and Dean Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. 

Acting Director of M.A. Program Jerome W. Rausch, O.S.C. 



Dean of Students 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Degree Programs: 
Name of Degree 
M.Div. 

M.Div. with Mission Specialization 
M.A. in Theology 

5401 South Cornell Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 324-8000 



John Paul, M.S. C. 
ames Hartke, O.F.M. 
Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 
3-4 years 
3-4 years 
2 years 




CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

A style fostering rigorous theological inquiry and development of students' own 
intellectual and professional integrity in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. 
Normative professional program is the 4 year D.Min., but the M.A. or M.Div. 
may be awarded at 2nd and 3rd year terminal points for cause. Post-M.Div., 
D.Min. available, full or part-time. Academic doctorate is awarded in three areas: 
Jewish-Christian Studies, Reformation and Free Church Studies, Studies in The- 
ology and the Human Sciences. 

President 
Academic Dean 
Director of Studies 
Director of Student Services, 

Registrar 
Business Manager 
Degree Programs: 
Name of Degree 

M.A. in Religious Studies 

M.Div. 




C. Shelby Rooks 

Perry D. LeFevre 

Barbara B. Zikmund 

Barbara M. Byhouwer 

Alfred M. Palfi 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 



D.Min. 
D.Th. 



3 years 

4 years 
6 years 



5757 South University Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312) 752-5757 



DE ANDREIS SEMINARY 



Owned and conducted by the Vincentian Fathers primarily for preparing priests 
to serve in the various apostolates of their religious community. Students may 
take part of their course work at DePaul University. 

President Anthony J. Falanga, CM. 

Academic Dean Nicholas E. Persich, CM. 

Dean of Students William E. Hartenbach, CM. 

Business Manager Anthony J. Wiedemer, CM. 



Registrar 
Degree Programs: 
Name of Degree 

M.A. in Theology 

M.Div. 



Jean F. Thomann 
Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 

3 years 

4 years 



511 East 127th Street 

Lemont, Illinois 60439 

(312) 257-5454 




I 



JESUIT SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY IN CHICAGO 

A professional school of ministry stressing an integrated academic-ministerial 
program, sponsored by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) of the United States. A major- 
ity of the students are Jesuits, but JSTC is open to all qualified men and women 
willing to share in free and intelligent exchange of ideas, learning and service. 

President 
Dean 

Acting Director of Admissions 
Treasurer 
Registrar 
Degree Program : 
Name of Degree 
M.Div. (Loyola) 



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James Hennesey, S.J. 

William G. Guindon, S.J. 

J. Peter Schineller, S.J. 

Alice E. Barrett 

Mary B. Williams 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

3-4 years 



5430 South University Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 324-9200 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 

Preparation for ministry. Curriculum emphasizes (1) the sources, structure, and 
dynamics of the Christian Faith; (2) the expression of that faith in our time. New 
campus (merger of 5 seminaries) deliberately located in urban setting adjacent 
to a major university. 



President 


Walter F. Wolbrecht 


Dean of Faculty 


Wesley J. Fuerst 


Acting Dean of Student Services 


Jean Bozeman 


Director of Graduate Studies 


Franklin E. Sherman 


Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 


Robert I. Tobias 


Director of Admissions 


Wilhelm C. Linss 


Budget Coordinator 


Arthur O. Arnold 


Registrar 


Roberta Piehl 


Degree Programs : 


Time Beyond A.B. 


Name of Degree 


Normally Required 


M.Div. 


4 years 


M.T.S. 


3 years 


M.R.E. 


2 years 


D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 


10 years 


S.T.M. 


6 years 


S.T.D. 


8 years 


1100 East 55th Street 




Chicago, Illinois 60615 




(312) 667-3500 





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McCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



McCormick Theological Seminary is a theological center for the United Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America. It focuses its educational resources 
on education for the ministry, emphasizing both pre-professional and professional 
studies. Its program of Latino Studies and its emphasis on internationalization add 
to its other offerings. On the Master's level, students are encouraged to plan, with 
advice, their own course of studies. 

President Jack L. Stotts 

Dean of the Seminary Lewis S. Mudge 

Director of Studies Earle Hilgert 

Director of Doctor of Ministry Program Robert C. Worley 

Director of Campus Affairs Barbara Prasse 

Business Manager Donald S. Hasty 

Degree Programs: Time Beyond A.B. 

Name of Degree Normally Required 

M.A. in Theological Studies 2 years 

M.Div.* 3 years 

M.Div./M.S.W. 4 years 

M.Div. /M.A.L.S. 4 years 

Th.M. 4 years 

S.T.M. 4 years 

D.Min. (2 years in ministry prerequisite) 8 years 

*may be taken with specialization in Latino Studies; Diploma in 
Latino Studies (3 yr. program) may be converted to M.Div. 
upon completion of baccalaureate degree. 

5555 South Woodlawn Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60637 
(312) 241-7800 




MEADVILLE/LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 



Offering the Doctor of Ministry as the normative professional degree for ministry. 
Students with earlier graduate study may apply for advanced standing. 



Acting Academic Dean 
Admissions Officer and Dean of Students 
Degree Programs : 
Name of Degree 
M.R.E. 
D.Min. 

5701 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312) 753-3195 



John C. Godbey 

Neil H. Shadle 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

4 years 



Ul 



NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The seminary was founded by churches of the American Baptist Convention. 
At the same time, it seeks participation in ecumenical dialog, endeavors to serve 
the whole body of Christ, and welcomes students of all Christian traditions. 




President 

Dean 

Director of Student Affairs 

Acting Business Manager 

Degree Programs : 

Name of Degree 

M.A. in Christian Education 
M.A. in Theological Studies 
M.Div. 



William R. Myers 

Robert P. Meye 

Robert L. Maase 

Henry W. Dahlberg 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

2 years 

3 years 



100 West Butterfield Road 

Oak Brook, Illinois 60521 

(312) 620-2200 



The following abbreviations are employed to indicate institutional sponsorship of 
the various programs and courses described in these Announcements 



BTS — Bethany Theological 

Seminary 
CTS — Chicago Theological 

Seminary 
CTU — Catholic Theological 

Union 
DEAN — DeAndreis Seminary 
JSTC— Jesuit School of 

Theology in Chicago 
LSTC — Lutheran School of 

Theology at Chicago 



M/L— Meadville/Lombard 
Theological School 

MTS — McCormick Theological 
Seminary 

NBTS— Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary 

CCTS — Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools 



CLUSTER AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

Introduction 

Among a variety of cooperative enterprises, the Cluster offers five unique pro- 
grams of education for ministry which draw in an integrated manner upon the re- 
sources of its member schools and the metropolitan Chicago area. These five Clus- 
ter Areas of Concentration are Personal Transformation, Social Transformation, 
Celebration, Cross-cultural Communication, and Interpretation and Communica- 
tion: Teaching. Brief identification of the major aspects of the planning process 
by which these programs have been developed will highlight their distinctive fea- 
tures. 

I. The Mandate for Planning 

The five Areas of Concentration represent the present stage of development 
in a process of several years of long range academic planning. Such planning 
includes the combined efforts of faculty, students, and staff who accepted the 
challenge to develop "a plan which will make the Cluster more than a 'co- 
ordinating instrumentality'" and "a blueprint for doing better together what 
we cannot achieve alone and for creating new and better styles of theological 
education ... or of improving the styles we already follow." 

II. The Basis of Planning 

All such planning has incorporated the principle of differential participation 
at the level of both the individual school and the individual student. At the 
institutional level each seminary retains full control over its own academic 
program, including: (1) the determination of the nature, scope, and manner 
of fulfilling the requirements which its own students must complete in their 
home school; and (2) the determination of whether and in what manner it 
wishes to participate as an institution, or wishes its students to participate, in 
the Cluster Areas of Concentration. (Differential participation at the level of 
the individual student will be noted below.) 

III. The Paramenters of Planning 

With such a common basis for planning as background, other crucial issues 
emerged. The decisions made regarding these fundamental issues constitute 
the planning parameters within which the Areas of Concentration have been 
shaped. 

A. The Curricular Model 

Since each school in the Cluster continues to offer its own introductory 
and advanced requirements related to such matters as denominational and 
confessional identity, spiritual formation, and ordination, the Cluster 
Areas of Concentration are not designed as a core curriculum in which all 
beginning students in each of the schools are expected to participate. 
Rather, the Areas of Concentration are designed as intermediate and ad- 
vanced elective offerings which are open to students who have completed 
at least one year of theological education and who have satisfied such 
other prerequisites as may be appropriate in a particular Area. 

B. The Organizing Principle 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to transcend the personal and 
professional fragmentation which frequently accompanies educational 
experiences which are circumscribed by a particular discipline or field or 
by a particular ministerial role or setting. Therefore, the concentrations 
have been organized in terms of broad areas of functional competence 
which are relevant to a variety of ministerial roles and settings and which 
are dependent upon the integration of performance and insights from a 
variety of disciplines. 

10 



C.The Defining Educational Characteristic 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to foster maximum feasible in- 
corporation of the following interfaces : 

1. instructional interface — integration of insights from a variety of dis- 
ciplines and fields, both classical and practical, through the assistance 
of faculty teams whose members represent such expertise; 

2. contextual interface ~ integration of theory and practice through the 
utilization of action-reflection styles of learning wherein students en- 
gage in and reflect upon ministries of various kinds with the assistance 
of peer consultation and professional supervision; 

3. formation interface ~ integration of the student's personal identity 
and professional identity, wherein understandings, attitudes, values and 
skills appropriate to each are experienced and perceived as mutually 
interdependent; 

4. professional interface ~ clarification of the student's professional iden- 
tity as minister (e.g., role, status, authority) in relation to members of 
other professions and occupations which represent corresponding areas 
of functional competence; 

5. ecumenical interface ~ inclusion of students and faculty representing 
diverse theological and ecclesiological traditions; and 

6. institutional interface ~ inclusion of students and faculty representing 
two or more institutions in the Cluster, and the utilization of institu- 
tional resources outside the Cluster. 

D.The Defining Structural Characteristics 

1. Differential Student Participation 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to be sufficiently flexible to 
enable students with varying degrees of interest and curricular freedom 
to participate in one or more such programs in the pursuit of several 
types of educational and ministerial objectives : 

a. to develop a generalized focus of competence which may (1) serve to 
inform and enrich other functional competencies required of "gener- 
alists" in a variety of ministries or (2) serve as a general foundation 
upon which the specialized competence required for ministries in 
research and scholarship may subsequently be built; 

b. to develop a more specialized focus of competence which may (1) 
provide an organizing center for other areas of competence required 
of generalists, (2) provide necessary preparation for those whose 
primary, if not exclusive, form of ministry will correspond to one of 
the areas of concentration, or (3) provide a more specialized founda- 
tion upon which the additional competencies required of researchers 
and scholars may be subsequently built; and 

c. to develop a more individualized focus of competence which may 
not correspond wholly to either of the foregoing patterns but which 
best serves the particular student. 

2. Functional Standardization 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to be sufficiently standardized 
to provide a functional degree of educational coherence and administra- 
tive compatibility. Three general types of units have been contem- 
plated: Intensive Unit I, Intensive Unit II, and Elective Units. During 
the current year Intensive Unit I in each Area of Concentration will be 
offered. Intensive Unit II and Elective Units may also be offered in sub- 
sequent years. The several Units which will be offered during the cur- 
rent year are described in the following pages. 

11 



CCTS 400 PERSONAL TRANSFORMATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 

Winter Quarter, 1976 Philip A. Anderson 

9 QH Credit Professor of Pastoral Theology 

Wednesday, 9:00 A.M. - 9:00 P.M. Chicago Theological Seminary 

Thursday, 9:00 A.M. -12:00 Noon Robert T. Sears, S.J. 

Enrollment limited to 20 Assistant Professor of Fundamental 

Theology 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 
Margaret H. Steam 
Minister 
University Church of Disciples of 
Christ, and 
Co-Director 
Porter Foundation, University of 
Chicago 

I. Nature of the Unit 

Intensive Unit I is an in-depth experience in a learning-transforming com- 
munity for students who wish to acquire intermediate levels of competence in 
helping individuals and face-to-face groups more fully to actualize their po- 
tential through multi-faceted growth models. It is envisioned that all stu- 
dents, regardless of their previous experience, can grow, try out new ways 
of behavior for enabling growth, teach others, explore new theories and be 
members of the community. 

The Unit consists of one intensive quarter of involvement for which stu- 
dents will receive 9 QH (or 3 units) credit. With the approval of the respec- 
tive institutions in which they are matriculated, students who are involved 
in the Unit may also enroll in one additional course which does not conflict 
with the regularly scheduled meetings of the Unit. 

Intensive Unit I will fulfill prerequisites for the year-long Intensive Unit II 
in Personal Transformation which may be offered in 1976-77. Intensive 
Unit II will provide students with supervisory hours of credit toward mem- 
bership in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors or the Associa- 
tion for Religion and Applied Behavorial Sciences; however. Intensive Unit I 
offers no supervisory hours of credit. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I include the following: 

A. to assist students to develop a pastoral theological theory and research 
methodology relative to personal transformation which is grounded in the 
classical theological disciplines (Bible, history, ethics, and theology) and 
which is informed by dialogue with the history of the cure of souls, con- 
temporary theory and practice in pastoral counseling and clinical pastoral 
education, and relevant secular desciplines; 

B. to assist students to acquire direct personal experience of selected modes 
of personal transformation; and 

C.to assist students to acquire appropriate levels of competence in the uses 
of various modes of personal transformation. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are three principal components in Intensive Unit I: a learning-trans- 
forming community, ministry placements, and try-out events. 
A. A Learning-Transforming Community 

The faculty and students will be members in a learning-transforming com- 
munity. The process of building such a community will begin with a five- 

12 



day founding experience during January 5-9, 1976. The experience will 
be held in Green Bay, Wisconsin, at the modern Norbertine Abbey, where 
participants may enjoy private rooms, pool, sauna, and spacious acre- 
age. 

During this time group covenants for the quarter will be developed and 
theoretical and practical inputs will be organized. Individual student cove- 
nants, which will also be developed at this time, will include the identifi- 
cation of the specific personal and professional skills and theoretical un- 
derstandings on which one wants to work during the quarter. With per- 
mission of the faculty member(s) involved, students may also design their 
individual covenants to include required work which they would normally 
be expected to complete through another course; upon fulfillment of their 
covenants to the satisfaction of the faculty member(s) students would have 
fulfilled all or part of the course requirement. 

During subsequent weeks the total group will meet from 9:00 A.M. to 
9:00 P.M. on Wednesdays and from 9:00-12:00 noon on Thursdays, 
possibly away from the Cluster. Sub-groups /learning teams will also work 
together at other times on common interests, projects, theories, skill train- 
ing, and personal growth. 

The learning-transforming community will be engaged in four continuing 
activities : 

1. Acquiring and developing theory, content, and skills related to personal 
transformation. 

The theoretical inputs and content on growth and change will be wide- 
ranging and will be dependent upon the covenants established by the 
individual members and/or group. Illustrative possibilities include: 
prayer, spiritual direction, meditation. Yoga, and demonology; theo- 
logical understandings of grace, reconciliation. Christian community, 
confession, justification, redemption, and ethics; the meaning of bibli- 
cal themes, experiences, and words in the context of personal trans- 
formation and contemporary life; the relationship between pietism 
and activism— personal and social transformation; theories of person- 
ality and human development; the human potential movement, includ- 
ing Gestalt Therapy, Transactional Analysis, encounter, psychosyn- 
thesis, and bio-energetics; and therapeutic models such as psychoanaly- 
sis and ego-psychology. 

2. Experiencing of one's own growth and of enabling others to grow, both 
within the community and in try-out with others outside. 

3. Reflecting upon the experience and theory. 

4. Evaluating the ongoing process and the life of the community. 
Evaluative decisions will be agreed upon communally within the following 
general guidelines; a paper or project indicating integration of theory and 
skills, as well as self-evaluation, peer evaluation, and supervisory evalua- 
tion, will serve as bases for evaluation at the end of the Unit. 

B. Ministry Placements 

It is expected that all students will be involved in some form of ministry 
which provides leadership experience in personal transformation and that 
such involvement will be utilized in the Unit. Students without access to 
such involvements will be assisted to find appropriate placement during 
the quarter in which the Unit is offered. Students who desire to do so will 
also be assisted to find appropriate placement in the quarter preceding the 
Unit. 



13 



C. Try-out Events 

In addition to the experiences of leadership which are expected of them 
within the Unit and within their respective placements, students will be 
provided opportunity to become team leaders with faculty members in 
designing, executing, and evaluating short-term personal transformation 
events for other persons and groups. Possibilities for try-outs may include 
such organizations, groups and occasions as the following: Cluster, 
churches, lay people, house church weekends, spiritual weekends, and 
experiential theology weekends. 

IV. Admission to the Unit 

Open to students (1) who have completed one or more years of theological 
education) (2) who have had some of the following experience and training 
(one or more quarters of Clinical Pastoral Education; laboratory experiences 
in small groups, personal growth, etc.; basic courses in personal counseling 
and group work); and (3) who have obtained the approval both of the 
school in which they are matriculated and of the Personal Transformation 
teaching team. Approval of the teaching team should be requested through 
an application form which may be obtained from the office of the registrar 
at each school. The application should be submitted to a member of the 
teaching team by November 21, 1975, after which students will be notified 
of their approval for admission. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission should 
register for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each 
school during the week of December 1-5, 1975. 

After having registered, students will become part of the planning process 
for the Unit. 

CCTS 420 SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 

Fall Quarter, 1975 and Robert Benne 

Winter Quarter, 1976 Associate Professor of Church and 

12 QH Credit Society 

Thursday, 9:00 A.M. - 3:30 P.M. Lutheran School of Theology at 

Enrollment limited to 25 Chicago 

Richard M. Leliaert, O.S.C. 

Assistant Professor of Doctrinal 

Theology 
Catholic Theological Union 
Albert E. Pero 

Instructor in Christian Education and 

Constructive Theology 
Lutheran School of Theology at 

Chicago, and 
Black Studies Coordinator 
Chicago Cluster of Theological 
Schools 
Marjorie Tuite, O.P. 

Coordinator of Ministerial Program 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 

I. Nature of the Unit 

Intensive Unit I is designed for upper level students who wish to acquire 
further competence is assisting organizations and institutions to become in- 
creasingly effective in ministering to persons in the light of Judeo-Christian 

14 



values. It is intended both for those who are equipping themselves for min- 
istries with the church as the object and agent of social change and for those 
who are preparing for service in agencies of social change other than the 
church. 

The Unit consists of a two-quarter sequence of involvement for which stu- 
dents will receive 12 Qfl (or 4 units) credit. Credit will be granted only upon 
successful completion of the full sequence. With the approval of the institu- 
tions in which they are matriculated, students who are involved in the Unit 
may also enroll in one or two additional courses each quarter. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I include the following: 

A. to assist students to develop an understanding of the interrelationships 
between Christian faith and the ministry of social transformation, espe- 
cially as these are clarified through the insights of biblical, historical, 
ethical, and theological disciplines; 

B. to assist students to develop an understanding of the interrelationships 
between social scientific disciplines and the strategy and tactics of social 
action; 

C. to assist students to understand the ways in which one's own intrapsychic 
and interpersonal relationships affect a ministry of social change, espe- 
cially as these are illumined within a context of mutual support and critic- 
ism; and 

D.to assist students to become insightful and responsible participants in min- 
istries of social change within church and community. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are three principal components in Intensive Unit I: theoretical pre- 
sentations, supervised ministry placements, and an integrative seminar. 
A. Theoretical Presentations 

The theoretical presentations will deal with four general areas and their 
interrelationships; tactics and strategy for social change; social theory and 
voluntary associations; the Bible, theology, and social change; and his- 
torical and ethical analysis of the role of the church in relation to social 
issues in America. 

B. Supervised Ministry Placements 

Each student will be involved in a ministry of social transformation either 
in a church or in a secular institution, agency or movement which aims at 
social change. Placements are intended to enable students to move from 
observation, through participation, to the assumption of significant re- 
sponsibility. Supervision and evaluation of student activities in the field 
will be established as part of a contract agreement with the staff early in 
the Fall Quarter. 

In addition to churches placement possibilities include the following: edu- 
cational institutions (public, private, and alternative schools and colleges 
and universities); private and governmental agencies concerned with men- 
tal health, medical care, racial justice, women's rights, welfare, and hous- 
ing; penal institutions and agencies related to the criminal justice system; 
community organizations, financial and investment institutions; the Al- 
liance to End Repression, etc. 

C. The Integrative Seminar 

Efforts will be made to relate the learnings acquired in the respective 
theoretical presentations and in the supervised ministry placements to one 
another in the integrative seminar. These efforts, in which the full teaching 

15 



team and all students will participate, will include the development of 
wholistic understandings of the ideological, institutional, interpersonal 
and intrapsychic factors which are facilitating or hindering social change 
in the students' respective placements. 

Project-reports indicating integration of theoretical and practical data 
as well as evidence of students' ability to function as insightful and re- 
sponsible participants in ministries of social transformation will serve as 
bases for evaluation at the end of the Unit. 
It is anticipated that students' involvement in the program during the two quarters 
will average between 15 and 20 hours per week, including class time, study, and 
ministry responsibilities. 
IV. Admission 

Open to students who have completed two or more years of theological edu- 
cation and who have obtained the approval of the school in which they are 
matriculated. 

Open also to others with backgrounds in theological and sociological dis- 
ciplines and/ or in social change experience who have completed one year of 
theological education and who have also obtained the approval both of the 
school in which they are matriculated and of the Social Transformation 
teaching team. Approval of the teaching team should be requested through 
an application form which may be obtained from the office of the registrar 
at each school. The application should be submitted to a member of the 
teaching team prior to the completion of one's registration. 
All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission may 
register at either of the following times: (1) at the time of their school's 
Spring pre-registration period for Fall quarter courses or (2) at the time of 
their school's Fall registration period for Fall courses—September 22-26, j 
1975. 



CCTS 440 CELEBRATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 

Winter Quarter, 1976 Wilhelm C. Linss 

9 QH Credit Professor of New Testament 

Monday, 3:00 - 9:00 P.M. Lutheran School of Theology at 

Thursday, 9:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. Chicago 

Enrollment limited to 20 Oscar J. Miller, CM. 

Professor of Communications and 

Homiletics 
DeAndreis Seminary 
Ross Snyder 

Professor of Religious Education 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr. 
Pastor 

Trinity United Church of Christ, 
Chicago 
Henry J. Piacitelli, CM. 

Director of Training in Pastoral 

Works 
DeAndreis Seminary 

I. Intensive Unit I is an experience in a learning-celebrating community for the 

16 



advanced student who wishes to become an ARTIST-INTERPRETER-IN- 
STIGATOR of religious celebration. The phrase "artist-interpreter-instigator" 
indicates that the objectives of the Unit go beyond assisting the student to 
acquire the ability to function as leader of public worship which is character- 
istically expected of all ministers. The phrase "religious celebration" includes 
both the traditional forms of worship and also paraliturgical and other forms 
of communal celebration in the Judeo-Christian tradition. 
The Unit consists of one intensive quarter of involvement for which students 
will receive 9 QH (or 3 units) credit. With the approval of the respective 
institutions in which they are matriculated, students who are involved in 
the Unit may also enroll in one additional course which does not conflict 
with the regularly-scheduled meetings of the Unit. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aim of Intensive Unit I is to assist the student to engage in the 
crucial acts of becoming/ growing as an artist-interpreter-instigator, viz. : 

A. to experience and comprehend how communal celebration bursts out of 
a people from the events of their common life, and from intensive lived 
moments of individual persons; 

B. to experience communal celebration as a mobilization of expressive arts 
and spontaneity; and 

C.to learn to share in the common experience and felt understandings of an 
actual people, especially the People of God, in such a way as to enable 
them to transform their lived moments into communal symbol and fresh 
communal celebration. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are four principal strands in Intensive Unit I: expressive arts, basic 
theory of celebration, clinical experience, and reflection and evaluation. The 
ministerial preparation of the student will be integrated in terms of these 
strands through the use of various theological and non-theological disciplines 
and various educational methodologies. 
A. Expressive Arts 

The expressive arts will engage and be engaged by the community through 
two related avenues: a Creative Expression Workshop and an Expressive 
Arts Seminar. 

1. Creative Expression Workshop 

The faculty and students will be members in a learning-celebrating com- 
munity. The process of building such a community will be initiated 
with a five-day founding event at a non-Cluster site during January 
5-9, 1976. The founding event will include a Creative Expression Work- 
shop, which will begin with an intensive exposure to some basic human 
experience (e.g., joy, pain, loneliness, hope, grief, etc.). Members of 
the community will then express this experience in significant art forms 
and experience how other artists have expressed it. 

2. Expressive Arts Seminar 

During subsequent weeks the community will meet weekly on Thurs- 
day morning in an Expressive Arts Seminar in which members will 
share and possess each other's "mini-celebrations" and the work of rep- 
resentative artists. In this seminar members will work with various for- 
ms of expressive art in accord with their ability, e.g., drama, dance, 
music, painting, sculpture, song, celebrative preaching, photography, 

17 



T 



oral interpretation, creative writing, communications media, and stag- 
ing environment. 



B. Basic Theory of Celebration 

Members of the community will meet weekly on Thursday afternoon to 
lay solid theoretical foundations for celebration. Other resource persons 
will be utilized periodically. Areas of study include the phenomenology of 
celebration, symbolism and celebration, analysis of classic/contemporary 
examples of celebration, and structure and design of celebration. 

C. Clinical Experience 

Each student will be involved with a group outside the Cluster schools 
for the purpose of : 

1. Witnessing the process by which lived moments come to peak expres- 
sion in celebration in the group (first month), and 

2. Developing-teaching them to move further in celebration experience 
and life-style (last two months). 

D. Reflection and Evaluation 

The community will meet weekly on Monday afternoon and evening to 
engage in reflection and evaluation of their experiences and further 
development of their abilities as instigators of celebration. 

A project-report indicating integration of celebration theory and skills, as 
well as members' development as artists-interpreters-instigators of 
religious celebration within the community and within the non-Cluster 
groups with which they have worked will be assessed through self-evalua- 
tion, peer evaluation, and supervisory evaluation at the end of the Unit. 

IV. Admission 

Open to students who have completed two or more years of theological 
education and who have obtained the approval of the school in which they 
are matriculated. 

Open also to students (1) who have completed one year of theological edu- 
cation; (2) who have some of the following experiences and education (at 
least minimal ability-experience in an area of expressive arts, two «or more 
courses in the general field of celebration, and adequate experience in actual 
situations of celebration); and (3) who have also obtained the approval both 
of the school in which they are matriculated and of the Celebration teaching 
team. Approval of the teaching team should be requested through an appli- 
cation form which may be obtained from the office of the registrar at each 
school. The application should be submitted to a member of the teaching 
team by November 21, 1975, after which students will be notified of their 
approval for admission. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission should 
register for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each 
school during the week of December 1-5, 1975. 



18 



CCTS 460 CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 

Spring Quarter, 1976 John Boberg, S.V.D. 

9 QH Credit Assistant Professor of Mission 

Monday, 9:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. Theology 

Wednesday, 3 : 00 - 9 : 30 P.M. Catholic Theological Union 

Enrollment limited to 20 Helmut H. Loiskandl, S.V.D. 

Visiting Professor of Anthropology 
Catholic Theological Union 
Richard P. Poethig 
Director 
Institute on the Church in Urban- 
Industrial Society, and 
Professorial Lecturer in Church and 

Industrial Society 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Carl S. Dudley 

Associate Professor of Ministry 
McCormick Theological Seminary 

I. Rationale 

The Church is at the threshold of a new era. The growing thrust toward 
unity on the economic and political planes, the deeper realization of cultural 
pluralism within that unity, and the greater involvement in the struggle for 
human dignity have all given new thrust and direction to the Church's task 
in the world today. 

The global scope and character of the problems demand an equal response. 
It is of the greatest importance that Christians of diverse national, racial, 
class and theological backgrounds, perspective and commitments find ways 
to listen to and learn from one another. If American theological education is 
to make creative contributions to such issues as racism, the use and distribu- 
tion of the world's wealth and resources, the struggles for human liberation 
and the development of societal structures which are more open and just, it 
must do so as a community which has learned to reflect and act in an inter- 
national context. 

For some the response will go further. They desire to be persons of dialogue, 
to live a precarious existence between different cultural worlds. They aim 
to spend their lives, or part of them, with people of another culture, dis- 
covering ways to think and work together in Christ about the fundamental 
problems which confront the entire human family in relation to peace, jus- 
tice and survival. 

II. Nature of the Unit 

The concentration has a double major thrust which will serve the needs and 
goals of a wide variety of students. On the one hand, it will give high pri- 
ority to those students who desire to work or study in another cultural en- 
vironment and will help them acquire beginning levels of competence for ef- 
fective communication in cultures and subcultures other than their own. 

At the same time, the concentration will provide a wider range of students 
the opportunity to experience in a unique way the cultural assumptions and 
limits of their theological thinking, and to lay the foundation for a broader 
international, interracial and ecumenical understanding, concern and com- 
mitment both in their theological education as well as in their further min- 
istry. 

III. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I include the following : 

19 



A. to sensitize students to the diversity of cultural expression; 

B. to assist students to develop skills in the analysis of culture and com- 
munication and to acquire a beginning competence in cross-cultural com- 
munication; 

C. to lay a foundation for students' understanding of, concern for, and co- 
operation in issues of international scope and character; 

D.to help students to interpret their experience to the wider Church in order 
to contribute to an international perspective on mission and ministry. 
IV. Structure of the Unit 

There are three principal components in Intensive Unit I: basic theory of 
culture and communication, field placements, integrative discussions ("de- 
briefings"). 
A.Basic Theory (Four weeks: March 29-April 23) 

The theoretical presentations will focus on such matters as understanding 
the ways in which cultural factors influence experiencing and symboliza- 
tion, thereby influencing the ways in which communication is given and 
received; understanding the nature of any culture through a representative 
examination of selected contrasting cultures and sub-cultures in the light 
of cultural anthropological perspectives; understanding the theological 
issues involved in the cultural conditioning of all experience and symboli- 
zation; understanding the nature of the communication process from theo- 
logical, psychological and sociological perspectives; and understanding 
what it means theologically to communicate the meaning of the Christian 
faith. 

Such understanding will be addressed through the following topics : 

1. Culture: Nature and Origin; Enculturation—Ethnocentrism—Prejudice; 
Culture Dynamics: Persistance and Change 

2. My Culture: Historical Background; Common Characteristics 

3. Communication Theory : Verbal—dialogue; Non-verbal 

4. Obstacles to Communication: Historical; Cultural 

5. Communication of the Gospel: 
A.Why : Theology of Mission 

B. How: Evangelization: Dialogue (Religious); Witness; Worship 

6. Global Awareness: Peace and Justice; Population Growth; Develop- 
ment 

7. Introduction to specific cultures of field placements. 
B. Field Placements (Three weeks: April 26-May 14) 

The field placement is an integral part of the Unit. It is designed to offer 
students an opportunity to practice and develop skills and to test theories 
of cross-cultural communication in an authentic or simulated cross-cul- 
tural life situation. 

During the 1976 Spring term, the type of field placement especially re- 
commended will be a three-week intensive "live-in" experience. Other 
types of field placement will be available to those who are able to commit 
themselves to some specific cross-cultural situation for at least two aca- 
demic quarters. These latter placements would continue throughout the 
Spring quarter, but with greater intensity during April 26-May 14. 

Various field placements will be available between April 26 and May 14. 
Separate descriptions of these field placements are available on request. 
The following are representative: 
1. Puerto Rican: on location in Puerto Rico 



20 



2. Chicano-Indian : on location in rural New Mexico 

3. Latino: in Chicago area 

4. Black: in Chicago area 

All field placements are intended to embody the following features: 

1. an intensive community live-in experience in a cross-cultural situation; 

2. an opportunity for the practice of cross-cultural skills; 

3. planned supervision and guidance; 

4. availability of a peer group, reflector group or other support group 
C. Integrative Discussions (Two weeks: May 17-28) 

Following the three-weeks of intensive field placement, students will en- 
gage in a two-week, post-field "de-briefing" period during which their 
cross-cultural field experiences will be reported on, analyzed and critically 
evaluated from the standpoint of personal learning and growth. Every stu- 
dent will be expected to have kept a complete diary (log) of field experi- 
ences. 

A clear expectation of the "de-briefing" period is that all students will 
evaluate and process their field experience is such a way as to make con- 
crete plans for application in terms of ministry. These plans may be of an 
interpretative or vocational nature. 
V. Admission to the Unit 

Open to students who have completed one or more years of theological edu- 
cation and who have obtained the approval of the school in which they are 
matriculated. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission should 
register for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each 
school during the week of February 23-27, 1976. 



CCTS 480 INTERPRETATION AND COMMUNICATION: 
TEACHING: INTENSIVE UNIT I 

Winter and Spring Quarter, 1976 Eugene A. Mainelli, O.P. 

9 QH Credit Supervisor 

Thursday, 10:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M. Center for Studies in Religious 

Enrollment limited to 20 Education 

Theodore C. Ross, S.J. 

Assistant Professor of Historical 

Theology 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 
Graydon F. Snyder 

Professor of Biblical Studies 
Bethany Theological Seminary 
Ann B. Rathbun 

Director of Clinical Studies 
I. Nature of Unit Chicago Theological Seminary 

Intensive Unit I is designed for advanced students who wish to become in- 
creasingly competent in (1) understanding and integrating basic orientations 
to the substance and style(s) of interpreting and communicating Christian 
faith which are operative in their own life situations and in those of repre- 
sentative groups with whom the church engages in ministry; (2) interpreting 
in their historical and contemporary contexts selected dimensions of the 



21 



Judeo-Christian tradition and the modern world which are relevant to such 
life situations; and (3) communicating, and assisting others to communicate, 
effectively through teaching in the light of such understandings and inter- 
pretive abilities. The concentration is intended to be of value to students who 
plan to engage in a variety of teaching ministries, e.g. in local churches as 
pastors or directors of educational programs; in public or parochial schools 
as teachers or supervisors of teachers; in institutions of higher education as 
campus ministers or professors; and in organizations and agencies of various 
kinds as educational consultants. 

The Unit consists of a two-quarter sequence of involvement for which stu- 
dents will receive 9 QH (or 3 units) credit. Credit will be granted only upon 
successful completion of the full sequence. With the approval of the respec- 
tive institutions in which they are matriculated, students who are involved 
in the Unit may also enroll in two or three additional courses each quarter. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The General aims of the Unit include the following: 

A. to assist students to enhance their understandings of the nature and di- 
mensions of the hermeneutical task in relation to the life situations of 
people, to the contemporary world, and to the Judeo-Christian tradition 
in light of pertinent philosophical, theological, scientific and artistic per- 
spectives; 

B. to assist students to develop a growing understanding and appreciation of 
the predicaments and possibilities which characterize the life situations of 
individuals and groups, of the resources of the Judeo-Christian tradition 
and of other sources of insight which are relevant to such predicaments 
and possibilities, and of the teaching-learning theories and methods which 
may be employed to relate these resources to the human predicaments 
and possibilities ; 

C. to enable students to function effectively and collegially in enhancing 
specific ministries of interpretation and communication through teaching, 
and in assisting others to function in similar manner; 

D. to assist students to integrate their understandings of the substance and 
style(s) which are appropriate to the relevant interpretation and communi- 
cation of Christian faith in relation to human predicaments and possibili- 
ties with their personal and professional self-understanding and function- 
ing. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are three components in Intensive Unit I: an interpretive seminar, 
supervised ministry placements, and an integrative seminar. 
A. Interpretive Seminar 

In the interpretive seminar students and faculty will collegially develop 
teaching-learning activities and, as deemed appropriate, covenants which 
bring their several unique concerns and competencies to bear upon the 
achievement of the general aims of the Unit ~ particularly those rep- 
resented in A and B above. However, in order to insure the availability of 
certain teaching-learning activities and resources which participants may 
choose to employ but which could not with certainty be developed after 
the Unit has begun, the teaching team has taken the initiative to develop 
two broad sets of complementary options (and their correlative networks 
of resources) which will be discussed fully by all Unit participants before 
final decisions are made regarding their adoption and implementation. 

If the first broad option is adopted and implemented, early in the Unit 

22 



students will be assisted by the teaching team to acquire familiarity with 
and experience in employing fundamental principles and methods of iden- 
tifying, analyzing, and evaluating basic orientations to the substance and 
style of interpreting and communicating Christian faith through teaching. 
Special attention may be given to acquiring such familiarity and experi- 
ence through an exploration of how these orientations are embodied, for 
example, by Unit participants, by persons or periods of historic signifi- 
cance in participants' denominations and/ or other groups, and by certain 
contemporary Chicagoland churches of various denominations and races. 
In carrying out such explorations through several observation visits to the 
selected churches, whose ministries are characterized by unique crea- 
tivities, consistencies, or constituencies, students will be assisted by local 
clergy and laity in identifying, analyzing, and evaluating their respective 
orientations to content and method of interpretation and communication 
of Christian faith through teaching. 
B. Supervised Ministry Placements 

The supervised ministry placements are designed to foster collegial reali- 
zation of the several general aims of the Unit ~ especially that represented 
in C above. 

If the second of the previously-mentioned broad options which have been 
developed by the teaching team is adopted and implemented, student 
teams (comprised of several members each) will be assisted to negotiate 
placements in settings in which they will serve for the two quarters of the 
Unit. For most student teams, it is anticipated that such placement will 
be in a local church (or ecumenical and interracial cluster of churches) 
in the vicinity of Hyde Park or Oakbrook-Lemont. 

It is not contemplated that student teams will be assigned to provide staff 
leadership for existing educational programs of the church /cluster. Rather, 
team members will serve as educational resource persons or consultants, 
together with clergy and laity in the respective settings, in a joint endeavor 
to identify and to assess the effectiveness of the orientation(s) to the sub- 
stance and style of interpreting and communicating Christian faith which 
are currently employed in selected teaching-learning situations; to identify 
critical needs which can be addressed through enhancing the substance 
and style of such interpretation and communication; to design one or 
more significant teaching-learning events to address such needs; and to 
provide appropriate leadership and/or direction in carrying out such 
event(s). The number of such events to be designed and led or directed 
by each student team will be determined by consultation among the stu- 
dent team, the teaching team, and the church/ cluster representatives. 

As their respective schedules permit, and as the respective placement 
situations indicate, members of the teaching team will participate on loca- 
tion with student teams in carrying out the foregoing functions. However, 
it is expected that during the course of the Unit a member of the teaching 
team will participate appropriately in such functions in relation to at 
least one of each student teams' teaching-learning events. 

Through consultative and supervisory relationships with student peers, 
faculty, and church/cluster clergy and laity, student team members will 
have opportunity to develop skills in evaluating process, product, and 
program dimensions of their collective experience. Such dimensions may 
include, respectively, (1) assessment at periodic intervals of the planning 
and interaction among themselves and between themselves and those 
with whom they are involved in the respective placement settings; (2) 

23 



assessment upon their successive completion of the respective teaching- 
learning events; and (3) assessment upon its completion of the contribu- 
tions of the Unit-as-a-whole to the equipping of students for interpretive 
and communicative ministries through teaching and also to the enhancing 
of the respective churches'/ clusters' ministries of this kind. 

Students who wish to explore the possibility of a year-long placement in 
a setting appropriate to the Unit, or who wish to explore the possibility 
of a non-church placement during the Unit should contact the teaching 
team early in the Fall quarter. 



Integrative Seminar 

In the integrative seminar students will have opportunity to pursue reali- 
zation of the several general aims of the course ~ particularly that repre- 
sented in item D above. More specifically, it will provide occasion, for stu- 
dents to engage in processes of further unifying conceptual, emotional, 
and behavioral dimensions of experience which bear upon the develop- 
ment of their personal and professional self-understandings and com- 
petencies as interpreters and communicators of Christian faith through 
teaching. By such means as may commend themselves to Unit partici- 
pants, effort will be made to draw together experiences in the integrative 
seminar (including observation visits to selected churches) and in the re- 
spective placement settings. Among such possible means is student utili- 
zation of the teaching team as resource persons and consultants in plan- 
ning, implementing, and evaluating the teaching-learning event(s) in which 
the several teams are involved in their respective placement settings. Case 
studies, audio and video recordings, and individual and team evaluation 
procedures such as those noted earlier will also be available to provide 
constructive feedback and guidance from a variety of complementary 
perspectives for continuing development and integration. 



IV. Admission to the Unit 

Open to students who have completed two or more years of theological edu- 
cation and who have obtained the approval of the school in which they are 
matriculated. 

Open also to students with backgrounds in theological and educational dis- 
ciplines and/or with teaching experience who have completed one year of 
theological education and who have obtained the approval both of the school 
in which they are matriculated and of the Interpretation and Communication 
teaching team. Approval of the teaching team should be requested through 
an application form which may be obtained from the office of the registrar 
at each school. The application should be submitted to a member of the 
teaching team by November 21, 1975, after which students will be notified 
of their approval for admission. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission should 
register for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each 
school during the week of December 1-5, 1975. 



24 



CLUSTER COURSES OF 
COOPERATIVE INSTRUCTION 

In addition to the previously-described Areas of Concentration, the Cluster 
also offers team-taught courses which draw in an integrative, but less intensive, 
manner upon the resources of its member schools and the metropolitan Chicago 
area. These courses involve ecumenical and, frequently, interdisciplinary teaching 
teams, and are characterized by concern for students' personal-professional devel- 
opment and by concern to draw imaginatively upon the resources of significant 
persons, programs, and settings in metropolitan Chicago. 

Such courses are especially designed to enable students to experience the enrich- 
ing and stimulating give-and-take of dialogue and service in various ecumenical 
contexts without requiring the larger investment of time and commitment which 
are necessitated by the Cluster Areas of Concentration. 

Admission is open to students through the regular cross-registration procedures 
which are operative among the Cluster schools. 

1975-76 Courses of Cooperative Instruction* 

5800 S. Stony Island Ave., Chicago. Enrollment 
limited to 8 students; admission only by ap- 
proval of instructors. 



CCTS 490A, B, C (4 each quarter) 
Ministry Laboratory : Religion and Health 

This seminar will be devoted to exploring issues 
of religion and health as they are found in dia- 
logue with our contextual experience of min- 
isterial praxis in pastoral visitation and care at 
Illinois Central Community Hospital. This 
year-long course may be taken for one or more 
quarters, as a student desires. Students will be 
assigned to rotating services (medical, surgical, 
etc.) in the hospital, and will spend ap- 
proximately three to four hours weekly en- 
gaged in pastoral care in the hospital. There 
will also be a weekly two-hour reflection semi- 
nar led by the course faculty. In addition, stu- 
dents will be involved in appropriate hospital 
events, including a general orientation period, 
participation in patient-centered conferences 
with other health care professionals, auditing 
of grand rounds, and participation in general 
in-service and continuing education programs 
as seems appropriate to the interest of both stu- 
dents and hospital staff. Students will also 
prepare contact-reports and have an opportu- 
nity to conduct chapel services in the hospital. 
Reflection Seminar meets Friday, 3-5 pm; 
Patient-Centered Conferences usually meet Fri- 
day 1-3 p.m. An all-day orientation session 
(9 am - 4 pm) will be held the first Friday of 
each quarter: Fall, October 3; Winter, January 
9; Spring, April 2. Course will meet at Illinois 
Central Community Hospital, Classroom 16, 



F 1-5 -I- Lab Fall /Winter /Spring 

George A. Fichette 

Supervisory Resident, Department of 
Pastoral Care and Education 

Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical 
Center 
Carl D. Schneider 

Assistant Professor of Religion and 
Personality 

Meadville/Lombard Theological School 
John W. Stettner 

Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
John-Daniel P. Mendes 

Director, Department of Hospital Education 

Illinois Central Community Hospital 
CCTS 495 

Religious Experience, Spirituality, Spiritual 
Growth 

This course explores how some important 
spiritual writers of the Roman Catholic and 
Baptist traditions deal with man's relation- 
ship with God and how one can arrive at a 
deeper experience of God. Religious experi- 
ence will be explored starting from C. Meyer's 
The Touch of God. "Holiness" and "progress" 
will be studied in the light of personal growth, 
especially from the notion of the symbolic as 
outlined in C. A. Bernard, Initiation au lan- 
* Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course number, courses are offered for 3 quarter hours 
credit. 



25 



guage symholique. Requirements: comparison 
between traditional and contemporary work 
on spirituality; study journal or major paper 
and project. Initial session at CTU. 

TBAn Winter 

Damien Isabell, O.F.M. 

Assistant Professor of Spiritual Theology 

Catholic Theological Union 
Lynn R. Buzzard 

Assistant Professor of Ministry 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 



CCTS 472 

Communicating The Gospel in a Scientific Age 

In this course the following goals will guide the 
study: (1) to introduce students to theologies 
and theologians which seek explicitly to ad- 
dress the contemporary scientific and techno- 
logical worldview; (2) to acquaint students with 
basic work in philosophy of science and theo- 
logical methodology which are relevant to 
such theological address; and (3) to assist stu- 
dents who are already familiar with matters 
represented by goals (1) and (2) further to ad- 
vance their understandings in these and/or 
related areas. In approaching such goals two 
methods will be emphasized: (1) individual 
tutorial sessions which will help the student to 
advance at his/her own pace, to deal with new 
perspectives and to prepare a research paper; 
and (2) seminar sessions which will deal with 
readings corresponding to the first two goals 
mentioned above. Readings in theology may 
include issues such as those raised in Peacock's 
Science and the Christian Experiment, Teil- 
hard de Chardin's Phenomenon of Man, Cobb's 
A Christian Natural Theology, as well as those 
dealt with in Gilkey's Religion and the Sci- 
entific Future, Barbour's Issues in Science and 
Religion, Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific 
Revolutions, and Margenau's Open Vistas. Pre- 
requisite: at least two courses in systematic or 
philosophical theology, and approval of the 
convenors. Scientific background helpful but 
not necessary. Initial session at LSTC. 

Th 2-5 Winter 

Philip J. Hefner 

Professor of Systematic Theology 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
Ralph W. Burhoe 

Director 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and 
Science 



CCTS 572 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and the 

Sciences 

The seminar is designed as a forum for papers 
by theological and scientific faculty and ad- 
vanced students. It seeks to move toward a the- 
ology which is solidly grounded in the best of 
today's scientific understandings and which at 
the same time may be dynamic in eliciting I 
religious feelings and behavior characteristic of 
the best Christian tradition whereby persons are 
led to appreciate the reality of God's sover- 
eignty and grace which are manifest in environ- 
ing nature and in human form, and to find 
thereby a new meaning, hope, sense of duty, • 
and beatific perspective in God's realm. For re- 
mainder of course description consult p. 62. 

Th 7-10 pm Spring 

Ralph W. Burhoe 

Director 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion 
and Science 
Philip J. Hefner 

Professor of Systematic Theology 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
Other Theological Faculty and Scientists 

CCTS 489 (4) 

The Church's Peace Ministry: Issues and 

Perspectives 

What can the churches contribute to world 
peace? What understandings of world peace 
might guide religious thought and action toward 
a world without war? What theological and 
political standards are involved in setting limits 
and determining priorities for peace activities? 
How can the concern for world peace become a 
regular part of ministry at every level of church 
life? Eight Chicago-area seminary faculty in- j 
eluding the instructors of this course have met 
regularly as the curriculum development task 
force of the World Without War Council- 
Midwest to design an experimental course ad- 
dressing these questions. The course is expected 
to treat such topics as: the global political 
conditions for peace; the means and limits of 
citizen action for peace in the United States, 
with special emphasis on the role of the 
churches; and the theological bases for, and 
meanings of, the issues of global politics and 
citizen action. Class sessions will be held at 
North Park Theological Seminary, 5125 N. 
Spaulding Avenue, Chicago. 

Th 3 : 30-6 pm Spring 



26 



Donald F. Durnbaugh 

Professor of Church History 

Bethany Theological Seminary 
Lowell W. Livezey 

Executive Director 

World Without War Council ~ Midwest 
F. Burton Nelson 

Professor of Theology and Ethics 

North Park Theological Seminary 
Tyler Thompson 

Professor of Philosophy of Religion 

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

CCTS 491 

Grief, Death and Dying 

A study will be made of the person's relation to 
his/her own death: a typology of attitudes to- 
ward dying, theories of progression through dif- 
ferent attitudes, and the right of the person to 
die with dignity. Exploration will be made of 
the students' attitudes toward dying, and to- 
ward the dying person. If it is possible to ar- 
range contacts, students will have opportuni- 
ties to visit with, learn to know, and offer pas- 
toral care and counseling to a person or per- 
sons nearing death. Sessions held at BTS and 
NETS. 



Th 1 : 10-5 



Spring 



David Augsberger 

Professor of Pastoral Psychology and 
Counseling 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Byron P. Royer 

Professor of Pastoral Psychology 
Bethany Theological Seminary 

CCTS 501 (2) 

Symposium on Psychology and Religion 

The course will be different each time it is of- 
fered, as it will focus on some persons, topics, 
or issue of current interest in the broad fields 
of psychology and religion. Instructors from 
various schools, experts on pertinent subjects, 
or representatives of other religious groups 
may be involved. The particular focus for the 
course will be announced at least one quarter 
in advance. Initial session atLSTC. 

W 2-3: 50 Spring 

John W. Stettner 

Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Cluster Pastoral Care Faculty 



27 



CLUSTER DAY COURSES 



"Id 



A continuing concern of the Cluster is to enrich the teaching-learning experi- 
ences of students and faculty from each of its member institutions. The Cluster 
therefore seeks to enable students to have increased access to outstanding teachers 
and courses and to groups of students which they would otherwise be unlikely 
to encounter. The Cluster likewise seeks to enable faculty members to participate 
in rewarding teaching relationships with students and colleagues who represent 
traditions and perspectives not cusomarily encountered in their own institutions. 

A special curricular structure, known as "Cluster Day," has been created to en- 
courage and facilitate such interchange, especially between urban and suburban 
member schools. During each quarter, usually on Thursday, several outstanding 
electives which are representative of various disciplines and heritages in the Cluster 
are offered at locations which constitute an equitable distribution of travel time 
among the participating students. Each course is scheduled to meet only once a 
week and to avoid rush-hour traffic. The first session of' each course is held on the 
campus of the designated instructor. Thereafter the number of students enrolled 
from the respective seminaries provides the basis upon which each class will work 
out an equitable determination regarding the location and number of future week- 
ly sessions. Such a principle of operation permits the scheduling of each Cluster 
Day course to be highly responsive to the level of interest and initiative of students 
from the respective schools. 

Enrollment in all Cluster Day courses is open to students through the regular 
cross-registration procedures which are operative among the Cluster schools. 



1975-76 Cluster Day Courses* 

FALL LSTC PR 420 

BTS C-473 Christianity and Tragedy 

Mass Communication, Society and the Church A seminar which probes the relationship be- 

An analysis of contemporary media as art tween a tragic sense and vision of life and a 

forms and social commentary and influence. Christian one, and the bearing of this relation- 

and an exploration of the implications of this ship on theological understanding and Christian 

communication revolution for the church's proclamation. Basic readings are dramatic 

education, worship and mission. Areas for in- works of tragedy and selected sermons of Paul 

vestigation include theory, theology, creativ- Tillich. Limited enrollment, admission only by 

ity, effects, strategies, ethics, and controls of approval of instructor. Initial session at LSTC. 

radio, television, film, print, advertising, pub- Th2-4:30 rail 

lie opinion and polls. Course approaches in- Morns /. Niedenthal 

elude seminars, conferences, productions and Associate Professor of Functional Theology 

field trips. The class will participate in the day- Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

long conference on the Religious Use of Cable- rCTfi, ±n-) WINTER 

TV to be sponsored by the Cluster and the Mid- Communicating the Gospel in a Scientific Age 

west Religious Broadcast Council on Thurs- ^^ ^^^.^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ {oWo^xr.'^ goals will guide the 

day, November 13 at LSTC. Initial session at ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ .^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^ theologies 

and theologians which seek explicitly to ad- 
dress the contemporary scientific and techno- 



leRoyE Kennel j^^.^^j worldview; (2) to acquaint students 

Professor of Communications ^.^j^ ^^^^.^ ^^^j^ .^ philosophy of science and 

Bethany Theological Seminary theological methodology which are relevant to 

* Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course number, courses are offered for 3 quarter hours 
credit. 

28 



such theological address; and (3) to assist stu- 
dents who are already familiar with matters 
represented by goals (1) and (2) further to ad- 
vance their understandings in these and/or 
related areas. In approaching such goals two 
methods will be emphasized: (1) individual 
tutorial sessions which will help the student to 
advance at his/her own pace, to deal with new 
perspectives, and to prepare a research paper; 
and (2) seminar sessions which will deal with 
readings corresponding to the first two goals 
mentioned above. Readings in theology may 
include issues such as those raised in Peacock's 
Science and the Christian Experiment, Teil- 
hard de Chardin's Phenomenon of Man, Cobb's 
A Christian Natural Theology, as well as those 
dealt with in Gilkey's Religion and the Scientific 
Future, Barbour's Issues in Science and Religion, 
Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 
and Margenau's Open Vistas. Prerequisite: at 
least two courses in systematic or philosophical 
theology, and approval of the convenors. Sci- 
entific background helpful but not necessary. 
Initial session at LSTC. 

Th 2-5 Winter 

Philip J. Hefner 

Professor of Systematic Theology 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
Ralph W. Burhoe 
Director 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and 
Science 
CCTS 495 

Religious Experience, Spirituality, Spiritual 
Growth 

This course explores how some important spir- 
itual writers of the Roman Catholic and Baptist 
traditions deal with man's relationahip with 
God and how one can arrive at a deeper experi- 
ence of God. Religious experience will be ex- 
plored starting from C. Meyer's The Touch of 
God. "Holiness" and "progress" will be studied 
in the light of personal growth, especially from 
the notion of the symbolic as outlined in C. A. 
Bernard, Initiation au language symbolique. 
Requirements: comparison between traditional 
and contemporary work on spirituality; study 
journal or major paper and project. Initial 
session at CTU. 

TBAn Winter 

Damien Isabell, O.F.M, 

Assistant Professor of Spiritual Theology 
Catholic Theological Union 
Lynn R. Buzzard 

Assistant Professor of Ministry 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 



29 



SPRING 
CTS CH 393 

Women in the Protestant Tradition: Historical 
Sketches 

A look at the active role of women in the his- 
tory of Protestantism through autobiography 
and biography. Particular emphasis will be 
placed upon significant American women. 
Initial session at CTS. 

Th 2-5 Spring 

Barbara B. Zikmund 

Assistant Professor of Church History 

Chicago Theological Seminary 

CCTS 572 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and Sciences 

The seminar is designed as a forum for papers 
by theological and scientific faculty and ad- 
vanced students. It seeks to move toward a the- 
ology which is solidly grounded in the best of 
today's scientific understandings and which at 
the same time may be dynamic in eliciting 
religious feelings and behavior characteristic 
of the best Christian tradition whereby persons 
are led to appreciate the reality of God's sover- 
eignty and grace which are manifest in environ- 
ing nature and in human form, and to find 
thereby a new meaning, hope, sense of duty, 
and beatific perspective in God's realm. For re- 
mainder of course description consult p. 62. 

Th 7-10 pm Spring 

Ralph W. Burhoe 

Director 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and 
Science 
Philip J. Hefner 

Professor of Systematic Theology 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
Other Theological Faculty and Scientists 

CCTS 501 (2) 

Symposium on Psychology and Religion 

The course will be different each time it is of- 
fered, as it will focus on some persons, topics, 
or issue of current interest in the broad fields of 
psychology and religion. Instructors from vari- 
ous schools, experts on pertinent subjects, or 
representatives of other religious groups may be 
involved. The particular focus for the course 
will be announced at least one quarter in ad- 
vance. Initial session at LSTC. 

W 2-3: 50 Spring 

John W. Stettner 

Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Ouster Pastoral Care Faculty 



CLUSTER BLACK STUDIES 

The Cluster endeavors to strengthen and to stimulate initiatives on the part of 
its member institutions to the issues posed for theological education and ministry 
by the experiences and perspectives of Blacks. An important structural expression 
of this endeavor is the Cluster Black Studies Committee. With staff support from 
the Cluster Black Studies Coordinator, the Committee exercises such leadership 
functions as the following: (1) to assist Blacks of the Cluster in articulating their 
concerns and to assist Cluster institutions in addressing such concerns; (2) to de- 
sign strategies for incorporating issues raised by the experiences and perspectives 
of Blacks into the mainstream of the consciousness and curricula of the several 
institutions; (3) to plan activities which educate members of the Cluster com- 
munity regarding the nature and effects of racism and of ways in which it may be 
effectively overcome; (4) and to facilitate the development of resources to. fund 
and staff such enterprises as the foregoing. 

Approximately 54 Black students are pursuing studies in Cluster schools. 

The several Cluster institutions engage the following Black faculty, who repre- 
sent the indicated areas of expertise : 

Colvin Blanford (NBTS), Black Studies and Urban Church 

Meinrad P. Hebga (JSTC), Fundamental Theology 

James C. May (NBTS), Black Studies and Urban Church 

Albert E. Pero (BTS, CTS, CTU, DeAn, LSTC), Christian Education 

and Constructive Theology 
C. Shelby Rooks (CTS) Ministry 

Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr. (CCTS), Liturgy and Worship 

1975-76 Courses Related to Black Studies* 

CTS CM 305(11/2) 

Ministry in the Black Church persons with principles of methodological 
An examination of the role and function of the rationality for the correlation process. Read- 
Black minister in the U.S., including varieties ings, discussions, lectures, projects. Class ses- 
of ministry and differences in style among them. sions held at CTS. 
Rooks M 3:30-5 Fall Pero M 9-12 Winter 

CTS TEC 445 (IV.) JSTC DIVN 468 

Seminar in Contemporary Black Authors in Christianity : A Western or Universal Religion? 

Religion ^ tentative approach to Christianity from a 

Reading and discussion of selected authors, the viewpoint other than Western philosophy to 

authors to be announced. a'^swer the question: is Christianity a decadent 

Rooks M 3:30-5 Winter Western religion or a dynamic universal reli- 

gion? Format and requirements to be deter- 

CTS TEC 413 mined. 

CTUHDS413 Hebga TBAn Winter 

Correlating Christian Theology and Social LSTC RE 425 

Sciences Global Conscientization and its Effects on 
A careful examination and evaluation of the Religious Education Relative to the Black Corn- 
possible mutual interaction between the social munity 

sciences and Christian theology, using illustra- A careful study and evaluation of a pedogogi- 

tions from indigenous developments among cal process by which a person or a people gain 

Afro-Americans and depicting through such an a new awareness of their own reality, the forces 

analysis how the social disciplines can make a which objectify and oppress them within that 

contribution to the principles of Christian the- reality, and the potentiality for becoming the 

ology. Special attention given to equipping subjects of their own liberation (redemption) as 
* Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course number, courses are offered for 3 quarter hours 
credit. 

30 



well as becoming the agents of change for reli- 
gious education. Readings, discussions, lec- 
tures, projects. 
Pero TT 8: 30-9: 45 Spring 



BTS C-391 

DEAN Thl 308 

The Effects of Indigenization on the Principles 

of Religious Education 

An examination of the nature and function of 
religious education in the wake of impending 
indigenization movements. Readings, discus- 
sion, lectures, and projects. Class sessions held 
at BTS. 
Pero Th 11-12, 1-2:40 Spring 



CCTS 460 (9) 

Cross Cultural Communication: Intensive Unit 

I 

The concentration has a double major thrust 
which will serve the needs and goals of a wide 
variety of students. On the one hand, it will 
give high priority to those students who desire 
to work or study in another cultural environ- 
ment and will help them acquire beginning 
levels of competence for effective communica- 
tion in cultures and subcultures other than their 
own. At the same time, the concentration will 
provide a wider range of students the oppor- 
tunity to experience in a imique way the cultur- 
al assumptions and limits of their theological 
thinking, and to lay the foundation for a broad- 
er international, interracial and ecumenical 
understanding, concern and commitment both 
in their theological education as well as in their 
further ministry. For remainder of course des- 
cription consult pp. 19-21. 

Boberg/Loiskandl M 9 am-4 pm Spring 

Poethig/Dudley W 3-9 : 30 



NBTS PMC 554 [400 level) 

Practicum in Urban Church and Ministry 

The aim of this course is to glean understand- 
ings of the role of the urban church in con- 
temporary society; and to provide usable tools 
to assist local congregations in formulating 
goals relative to their own unique understand- 
ing and acceptance of its mission as the church 
of Christ. Special emphasis will be placed upon 
achieving the above objectives within the con- 
text of the Black church. 
May Th 7-9 :30 pm Fall 



CCTS 420 (12) 

Social Transformation : Intensive Unit I 

Intensive Unit I is designed for upper level 
students who wish to acquire further compe- 
tence in assisting organizations and institutions 
to become increasingly effective in ministering 
to persons in the light of Judeo-Christian values. 
It is intended both for those who are equipping 
themselves for ministries with the church as 
the object and agent of social change and for 
those who are preparing for service in agencies 
of social change other than the church. For re- 
mainder of course description consult pp. 14-16. 
Benne/Leliaert/Pero/Tuite 

Th 9 am-3 : 30 pm Fall/ Winter 



MTS MM 406 (4) 

Church Strategies in Changing Communities 

Study of the causes and patterns of changing 
communities, and the alternative strategies 
available to the church. Special attention will 
be given to the variety of resources and options 
available to the congregation and to regional 
church judicatories, and to the consequences 
of various decisions which churches have made. 
Open to pastors, laypersons and students. 
Dudley Sat 10-12 noon Winter 



NBTS CHT 523 [400 level) 
The Church and Social Change 

A study of the role of the Christian Church in 
affecting social change, both in the past and the 
present. A significant part of this study will 
focus on the roles of Black churchmen and 
Black congregations as change agents. Each 
student will be expected to present a paper to 
the class, embodying significant research and 
reflection. Assigned readings will be discussed. 
Blanf ord Th 7-9 : 30 pm Spring 



CCTS 440 (9) 

Celebration : Intensive Unit I 

Intensive Unit I is an experience in a learning- 
celebrating community for the advanced student 
who wishes to become an ARTIST-INTER- 
PRETER-INSTIGATOR of religious celebra- 
tion. The phrase "artist-interpreter-instigator" 
indicates that the objectives of the Unit go be- 
yond assisting the student to acquire the ability 
to function as leader of public worship which 



31 



is characteristically expected of all ministers. 
The phrase "religious celebration" includes 
both the traditional forms of worship and also 
paraliturgical and other forms of communal 
celebration in the Judeo-Christian tradition. 
For remainder of course description consult 
pp. 16-18. 

O. Miller/R. Snyder/ M 3-9 pm Winter 

Wright/Piacitelli Th 9 am-4 pm 

CCTS 480 (9) 

Interpretation and Communication: Teaching: 

Intensive Unit I 

Intensive Unit I is designed for advanced stu- 
dents who wish to become increasingly compe- 
tent in (1) understanding and integrating basic 
orientations to the substance and style(s) of in- 
terpreting and communicating Christian faith 
which are operative in their own life situations 
and in those of representative groups with 



whom the church engages in ministry; (2) 
interpreting in their historical and contempo- 
rary contexts selected dimensions of the Judeo- 
Christian tradition and the modern world which 
are relevant to such life situations; and (3) 
communicating, and assisting others to com- 
municate, effectively through teaching in the 
light of such understandings and interpretive 
abilities. The concentration is intended to be of 
value to students who plan to engage in a vari- 
ety of teaching ministries, e.g. in local churches 
as pastors or directors of educational programs; 
in public or parochial schools as teachers or 
supervisors of teachers; in institutions of higher 
education as campus ministers or professors; 
and in organizations and agencies of various 
kinds as educational consultants. For remainder 
of course description consult PP- 21-24. 
Mainelli/Ross Th 10 am-3 pm Winter/ Spring 
G. Snyder/ Rathbun 



32 



CLUSTER WOMEN'S ISSUES 

The Cluster undertakes to support and to advocate commitments by its member 
institutions to the issues raised for theological education and ministry by the ex- 
periences and perspectives of women. A significant organizational manifestation of 
this undertaking is the Cluster Women's Issues Committee. With staff support 
from the Cluster Women's Issues Coordinator, the Committee provides such lead- 
ership functions as the following: (1) to assist women of the Cluster, including 
spouses, in expressing their concerns and to assist Cluster institutions in respond- 
ing to such concerns; (2) to design strategies for incorporating the issues posed by 
the experiences and perspectives of women into the focal awareness and program- 
ming of the various institutions, (3) to plan activities which educate members of 
the Cluster community regarding the nature and effects of sexism and of means 
by which it may be effectively overcome; and (4) to facilitate the development of 
resources to fund and staff such enterprises as the above. Activities through which 
the Committee seeks to serve women and the larger Cluster constituency include 
publication of a periodical, PersonAge ; formulation and presentation of specific 
curricular and personnel recommendations related to women's concerns; consulta- 
tion and cooperation with women's caucuses and wives' groups in the respective 
Cluster schools; and sponsorship and leadership of such programs and projects 
as conferences, workshops, retreats, orientations, survey research, film and dia- 
logue groups, socials, and student-faculty rap sessions. 

Approximately 213 women students are pursuing studies in Cluster schools. 

The several Cluster institutions engage the following women faculty, who rep- 
resent the indicated areas of expertise : 
Jean Bozeman (LSTC), Religious Education 

Adela Y. Collins (MTS), New Testament 

Lois Dideon, r.c. (CTU, JSTC), Ministerial Program 

Mary Donahey, B.V.M. (CTU), Ethics 
Irene Dugan, r.c. (JSTC), Ministerial Program 

Shirley J. Heckman (BTS), Christian Education 

Gloria Heineman, r.c. (JSTC), Ministerial Program 

Joyce Kemp, r.c. (JSTC), Ministerial Program 

Elda Maase (NBTS), Christian Education 

Ann B. Rathbun (CTS), Clinical Studies 

Margaret H. Stearn (CCTS), Pastoral Care 

Marjorie Tuite, O.P. (JSTC), Ministerial Program and Social Structures in 

Ministry 
Peggy Way (JSTC), Ministerial Program and Pastoral Theology 

Jean S. Williams (M/L), Religious Education 

Barbara B. Zikmund (CTS), Church History 

To Be Announced (MTS), Women's Issues 

To Be Announced (MTS), Theology 

To Be Announced (MTS), Ethics 

1975-76 Courses Related to Women's Issues* 

Mlb CA 305 (4) j,^] ethical and theological perspectives of wo- 

Introduction to Women's Issues ^^^ ^^j th^ church . 

The course will focus on the issues of sex roles ^m TBAn Winter 

and identity while exploring the biblical, histori- 

* Unless indicated in parenthesis following the course number, courses are offered for 3 quarter hours 
credit. 

33 



't 



MTS NT 422 (4) 

The Idea and Function of Sacrament in New 

Testament Times 

Consideration of the symboHc significance of 
early Christian baptism and eucharist with at- 
tention to their personal and social appeal. 
Early Christian sacramental symbolism will be 
compared and contrasted with that of the mys- 
teries of Dionysus, Isis and Mithra. Special at- 
tention will be given to feminine symbolism 
and to the role of women. 
Collins TT 11-12:50 Winter 

CTS CH 393 

Women in the Protestant Tradition: Historical 

Sketches 

A look at the active role of women in the his- 
tory of Protestantism through autobiography 
and biography. Particular emphasis will be 
placed upon significant American women. 
Initial session at CTS. 
Zikmund Th 2-5 Spring 

MTS T 432 (4) 

Women's Issues : Theology 

The course will deal with both Liberation The- 
ology (i.e., Letty Russell, Mary Daly) and 
Systematic Theology (e.g., Calvin, Tillich). 
This course will look at why these theologies 
came into being. Second, it will look at the 
question of symbols within both theological 
processes and attempt to integrate them. 
Adj M 9-12: 15 Winter 

(Includes one-hour break for chapel) 

MTS T 408 (4)1 
Women's Issues : Ethics 

Focus in the course is upon ethical reflection as 
it is related to such societal issues as abortion, 
changing marriage patterns, child rearing, 
singlesness, rape, etc. Case studies may be used 
as a way of focusing and clarifying discussion. 
Adj W 2-4:50 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 465 

Issues in Pastoral Theology 

A study of selected contemporary issues of the 
field, looked at in terms of history, source, 
method and practice. Focus will center on wo- 
men and feminism in relation to the field; 
clarification of principles which differentiate 
and correlate "social justice" and "caring-coun- 
seling" perspectives; alternative formulations 



of a "theory of pastoral/priestly practice"; 
and relations between "Protestant" and "Catho- 
lic" pastoral theology. Each participant can ne- 
gotiate her/his primary issue from a more in- 
clusive list; planning and implementation of the 
entire course will proceed coUegially. Prerequi- 
sites: some practice/ theory in the broad area 
and approval of instructor. Limited enrollment. 
One individual tutorial during the quarter to 
be arranged. 

Way M 2-4: 45 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 444 
Sexuality and Pastoral Practice 
After moving through multidisciplinary per- 
spectives on the nature of human sexuality, we 
will focus on pastoral practice as rooted in the- 
ology and ethics and as practiced in specific 
relation to "living human documents." Each 
participant will develop a program or process 
to use in actual situations of pastoral practice. 
The entire course will embody a methodologi- 
cal study of the relations between "theology" 
and "culture" and how they affect pastoral prac- 
tice. One individual tutorial during the quar- 
ter to be arranged. Limited enrollment. 
Way M 2-4:45 Spring 

CTS CM 442 
Human Sexuality 

In an atmosphere designed to demythologize 
sexuality, the seminar examines different sexual 
styles, behavior, experience, cultural values, 
and over-reaction to sexual stimuli. Resources 
from theology and the behavioral sciences are 
utilized as each member is asked to develop a 
value stance about sexuality for our time and 
for ministry. 
Meyners Th 2-5 Winter 

CCTS 400 (9) 

Personal Transformation : Intensive Unit I 

Intensive Unit I is an in-depth experience in a 
learning-transforming community for students 
who wish to acquire intermediate levels of com- 
petence in helping individuals and face-to-face 
groups more fully to actualize their potential 
through multi-faceted growth models. It is en- 
visioned that all students, regardless of their 
previous experience, can grow, try out new 
ways of behavior for enabling growth, teach 
others, explore new theories and be members 
of the community. For remainder of course 
description consult pp. 12-14. 
Anderson/Sears/Stearn W 9 am-9 pm 

Th 9 am-12 noon Winter 



34 



CCTS 420 (12) 

Social Transformation : Intensive Unit I 

Intensive Unit I is designed for upper level stu- 
dents who wish to acquire further competence 
in assisting organizations and institutions to be- 
come increasingly effective in ministering to 
persons in the light of Judeo-Christian values. 
It is intended both for those who are equipping 
themselves for ministries with the church as 
the object and agent of social change and for 
those who are preparing for service in agencies 
of social change other than the church. For re- 
mainder of course description consult pp. 14-16. 
Benne/Leliaert/Pero/Tuite 

Th9am-3:30pm Fall/Winter 

CCTS 480 (9) 

Interpretation and Communication: Teaching: 

Intensive Unit I 

Intensive Unit I is designed for advanced stu- 
dents who wish to become increasingly compe- 
tent in (1) understanding and integrating basic 
orientations to the substance and style(s) of in- 



terpreting and communicating Christian faith 
which are operative in their own life situations 
and in those of representative groups with 
whom the church engages in ministry; (2) inter- 
preting in their historical and contemporary 
contexts selected dimensions of the judeo- 
Christian tradition and the modern world which 
are relevant to such life situations; and (3) 
communicating, and assisting others to com- 
municate, effectively through teaching in the 
light of such understandings and interpretive 
abilities. The concentration is intended to be of 
value to students who plan to engage in a vari- 
ety of teaching ministries, e.g. in local churches 
as pastors or directors of educational programs; 
in public or parochial schools as teachers or 
supervisors of teachers; in institutions of higher 
education as campus ministers or professors; 
and in organizations and agencies of various 
kinds as educational consultants. For remainder 
of course description consult pp. 21-24. 
Mainelli/Ross Th 10 am-3 pm Winter/ Spring 
G. Snyder/Rathbun 



35 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The following courses of study are offered during the present academic year by 
the member schools of the Cluster. Information on courses to be offered in subse- 
quent years by the several schools may in some cases be obtained from their res- 
pective current catalogs. 

Each course number is preceded by the initials of the institution(s) by which it is 
offered, viz: 



BTS — Bethany Theological 

Seminary 
CTS — Chicago Theological 

Seminary 
CTU — Catholic Theological 

Union 
DEAN — DeAndreis Seminary 
JSTC — Jesuit School of 

Theology in Chicago 
LSTC — Lutheran School of 

Theology at Chicago 



M/L— Meadville/Lombard 

Theological School 
MTS — McCormick Theological 

Seminary 
NETS— Northern Baptist 

Theological Seminary 
CCTS — Chicago Cluster of 

Theological Schools 
CRPC — Center for Religion 

and Psychotherapy of 

Chicago 



The Cluster schools employ a common numbering system for designating the level 
of each course of study. The levels of study are as follows: 

300-399 Introductory 

400-499 Intermediate 

500-599 Advanced 

600-699 Doctoral (D.Min., S.T.D., Th.D.) 
Exceptions are noted in brackets following the course number. 

Unless otherwise noted, all courses are offered for 3 quarter hours credit. Excep- 
tions are noted in parentheses following the course number. 

The following abbreviations are employed at appropriate points: 
Adj. — Adjunct faculty (to be announced) 
TBAn — To Be Announced (by the instructor or institution) 
TBAr — To Be Arranged (by the instructor in consultation with students) 

Tutorial or independent study is available in a variety of areas in most fields of the 

curriculum in all quarters, upon request of the student and upon approval of the 

instructor. 

I. BIBLICAL STUDIES 
A. OLD TESTAMENT 



CTU BLL 315 

The Bible : Its Formation and Interpretation 

The formation of the Bible in terms of the 
"word" and its revelation of God's presence as 
Savior within the community of faith. The 
emergence of a sacred tradition of holy writ, in- 
terpreted anew by and for each generation. 
Topics of special study include: biblical in- 
spiration and inerrancy; revelation, scripture 
and tradition; liturgy and the scriptures; the 
senses of scripture; canon; texts and versions; 



textual criticism. 
Senior/Stuhlmueller 



MW2-3:15 



Spring 



BTS A-323 

NBTS BHT 521 [300 level) 

Introduction to the Old Testament I : History 

and Archaeology 

A study of the history of Israel from 2000-65 BC 
with special emphasis on major events. The im- 
portance of archaeological discoveries is in- 
vestigated. Students will be required to read 



36 



from a good translation. Genesis - - II Kings. 
Bullock TT8-9:15 Fall 

BTS A-324 

NETS BHT 522 [300 level] 

Introduction to the Old Testament II 

In the second quarter the course will examine 
the later prophets and the writings with par- 
ticular attention to Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, 
Jeremiah and Ezekiel. The student's task will be 
to write an exegetical paper on a pericope selec- 
ted from one of these prophetic books. 
Neff MWF 10:30-11:20 Winter 

CTS CH 301 

The People and Faith of Israel I 

An introduction for beginning students to the 
problems of the historical and theological in- 
terpretation of the Old Testament against the 
background of the development of historical 
critical methods of biblical study. 
Lacocque MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

CTS CH 302 

The People and Faith of Israel 11 

A second course for beginning students dealing 
alternatively with narratives in the Hexateuch, 
or with selections from the Prophetic books of 
the Old Testament. The purpose of this course 
is to acquaint the student with one of the major 
literatures of the Bible and to examine it from 
several points of view, including its relevance 
for the pastoral ministry. In 1976, the 
theological evolution of the OT narratives in J, 
E, D, P, the Chronicler, and Apocalyptic. 
Lacocque MWF 9-9: 50 Spring 

CTU BLL 300 

Old Testament : Introduction 

Select passages from the books and major 
traditions of the entire Old Testament will be 
studied against the background of Israel's 
history, religion and literary genres. The 
primary goal of this course is a controlled 
knowledge of the Old Testament in preparation 
for future in-depth study of individual sections. 
Spilly MWF 9-9: 50 Fall 

Stuhlmueller M 6 : 30-9 : 30 pm Fall 

DEAN Bbl 341 

Old Testament : General Introduction 

This course explains the theological un- 
derstanding of inspiration, canonicity, and 
magisterium in regard to the Bible as they 
emerge from the Scriptures themselves. It also 
studies the history of the text, translations, ar- 
chaeology, biblical geography. A scholarly 



method of exegesis is explained and a sample 
exegesis is demanded of the student. Book 
reviews are required. Opportunity is offered for 
translating academic work into popular com- 
munication by participation in lay discussion 



groups. 
Rousseau 



MWF 8-8:50 



Fall 



LSTC OT 311 

Old Testament Studies I 

Introduction to the Pentateuch and survey of 
Israel's history through the United Monarchy 
with particular attention given to the problems 
of Exodus and Conquest. 
Fuerst MW 9-9:50 (-+ 1 of 5 sections) Fall 

LSTC OT 312 

Old Testament Studies II 

A study of the prophetic movement frrom Elijah 
to the post exilic prophets and the beginning of 
eschatology and apocalpyticism in the Old 
Testament. 

Michel MW 9-9 : 50 ( -|- 1 of 4 sections) Winter 
LSTC OT 313 
Old Testament Studies III 

An introductory survey course of the biblical 
books ~ other than the Pentateuch, Former 
and Latter Prophets ~, the Intertestamental 
and Rabbinic literatures (Talmud) and the prob- 
lems of Old Testament Hermeneutics. 
Michel MW 9-9 : 50 ( -h 1 of 4 sections) Spring 

MTS OT 301 (4) 

The Yahwist Revolution: Introduction to the 

Old Testament 

Introduction to Israel's antecedents, birth as a 
people, and early life as a nation, focusing on 
Genesis-II Samuel. Attention is given to ap- 
propriate critical methods for general Old 
Testament study, and to the content and the- 
ology of Israel's early epic traditions and law. 
Campbell WF 11-12:50 Fall 

MTS OT 302 (4) 

Prophecy, Worship and Wisdom 

Introduction to the Old Testament from I Kings 
to Malachi, with focus especially upon proph- 
ecy, designed to follow OT 301. Prerequisite: 
OT 301, or permission from the instructor on 
the basis of previous study of the Old Testa- 
ment. 
Campbell TT 12-1:50 Winter 

BTS A-320 
Genesis 

The course is designed to give an introduction 
to English exegesis and to acquaint students 



37 



with the pattern of thought found in the Old 
Testament. Following a general discussion of the 
place of Genesis in the Pentateuch and the im- 
portance of the Exodus event for Israel's life and 
thought, selected portions of the book will be 
exegeted with special attention given to form 
critical method. The course is designed in such 
a way as to encourage theological discussion on 
the topics of the Hebrew understanding of 
humanity, the relation of faith and culture, and 
the place of law and grace in the creation 
narrative. 
Neff Th 7-9 :30 pm Fall 

BTS A-325 

NBTS BHT 523 [300 level] 

Old Testament Theology 

Old Testament Theology proposes to establish 
a structure and unity to Old Testament thought. 
Neff /Bullock MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Spring 

MTS OT 471 (4) 

The Archaeology of Palestine and the Bible 

An exploration of the findings of archaeology in 

Palestine as they pertain to the Bible. Attention 

is given to the interrelationship of archaeology, 

history and Old Testament religion. 

Prerequisite: OT 301 and/or OT 302, or their 

equivalent. 

Campbell Th2-4:50 Spring 

NBTS BHT 520 (400 level) 
Biblical Archaeology 

This course seeks to relate archaeological skills 
and data to the task of understanding the Old 
and New Testaments, making full use of slides, 
film, and artifacts in relation to the biblical text. 
Mull M 7-9 : 30 pm Winter 

CTS CH 401 

Theology of the Old Testament I 

The birth and evolution of a major theme of 

Israel's reflection, such as the creation motive, a 

study of the Messianic Hope and the 

eschatological expectations of Israel, or the 

Priestly function in the time of the Old 

Testament. 

Lacocque MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

CTU BLL 400 

Historical Exegetical Study of the Pentateuch 

Historical-archaeological outline of 2nd 
millenium B.C. Patriarchal traditions viewed in 
the context of their literary origins. Exodus 
event as central to the understanding of the 
O.T. Term paper or equivalent project. 
Fox MWF 9-9: 50 Spring 



LSTC OT 439 
Genesis 1-11 

A study of Genesis 1-11, the purpose and func- 
tion of these narratives in the Bible and their 
relationship to other Ancient Near Eastern 
literature. 
Michel M 7-10 pm Fall 

CTU BLL 405 

The Deuteronomic History 

Deuteronomy and the deuteronomic history. 
From the "conquest" to the end of the 
kingdoms, stressing the deuteronomic theology 
of history in the major events of the period. 
Spilly MWF 11-11:50 Fall 

MTS OT 411 (4) 

Israel's Eighth Century Prophets 

A stu;'y of Amos, Hosea, Isaiah and Micah 
against the backdrop of the second half of the 
eighth century. There will be opportunity for 
students who use Hebrew to put it to work, but 
the course is open to those who have not 
studied Hebrew. Prerequisite: OT 301 or its 
equivalent. 
Campbell MTh 2-3:50 Fall 

LSTC OT 414 
Jeremiah 

Exegetical and historical studies in Jeremiah 
with a view toward acquisition of procedural 
experience and theological articulation. 
Fuerst TT 10 : 30-11 : 45 Winter 

CTU BLL 420 
The Psalms 

An intelligent and prayerful appreciation of the 
psalms will be sought by investigating their 
literary formation and their religious-liturgical 
usage in Israel. Select psalms will be studied 
from each literary or liturgical category, chosen 
for their importance to Israel, the New 
Testament or the theological-pastoral issues 
today. 
Stuhlmueller Tu 7-9 :30 pm Spring 

DEAN Bbl 417 
The Psalms 

The course is intended to help the participants 
to achieve a good working knowledge of the 
Book of Psalms. Individual psalms are studied 
from the standpoint of language and style, con- 
tent and form, in order to establish their type or 
genre. Their place and use in the cultic life of 
Israel is investigated. Main theological ideas are 
discussed, and their importance and usefulness 
for personal devotions learned. A scholarly 



38 



paper is required. Students are offered an op- 
portunity to translate their academic un- 
derstanding into popular communication by 
participation in lay discussion groups. 
Rousseau MWF 10-10:50 Fall 

CTU BLL 425 

Old Testament Wisdom Literature 

Perennial themes: e.g. creation, suffering, birth- 
death; and attitudes: e.g. toward poverty, op- 
timism, humanism, God ~ as exemplified in the 
wisdom movement in Israel. Particular attention 
to the expression of these topics in Job, Pro- 
verbs, Qoheleth, Sirach, and Wisdom. Term 
paper or equivalent project. 
Fox MWF 12-12:50 Winter 

CTS CH 410 

Exegesis of the Old Testament II 

An exegetical study of an Old Testament book 
or part thereof. The knowledge of Hebrew is no 
prerequisite, but reference is made in an un- 
derstandable way to the original terminology of 
the text under consideration. In 1975, 
Zechariah, Chaps. 9-14 (II Zechariah). 
Lacocque TT 10 : 30-12 Fall 

CTS CH 411 

Exegesis of the Old Testament III 

The Book of Qoheleth. See description of CH 
410. The level is higher in this series which, in 
the coming years, deals with the Songs of the 
Servant of the Lord in the Second Isaiah, the 
book of Job, and Qoheleth. 
Lacocque TT 10 : 30-12 Spring 

CTU BLL 415 

Evolving Form of Prophetism During the Exile 

and Post-Exilic Periods 

The salient role of Ezekiel and Deutero-Isaiah 
during the pivotal period of the exile. Later sub- 
servience of the prophetic movement to priestly 
legalism or to the apocalyptic form of postexilic 
Judaism. The study will be undertaken by 
means of key texts within the prophets. 
Stuhlmuelier MWF 10-10:50 Winter 

Stuhlmueller M 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

CTU CMM 440 

Christianity in World History : The Question of 

Prophecy Today 

For course description consult World Mission 

Studies offerings. 

Boberg/Fox W 7-9 :30 pm Fall 

CTU BLL 490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

For course description consult New Testament 



offerings. 

Senior/Stuhlmueller Tu 7-9:30 pm 



Fall 



CTU BLL 518 

Jewish Literature of the Hasmonean and Roman 

Periods 

Historico-cultural-religious developments of the 

period. Jewish apocalyptic and its influence on 

the religious thought of the Jews. Implications 

for New Testament study. Study of selected 

themes. 

Spilly Th 2-4:30 Winter 

NBTS BHT 536 
The Book of Psalms 

An exegetical study of the Book of Psalms, at- 
tempting to establish literary structures and 
form, setting and genre of the Psalms. Selected 
texts will be studied in detail (exegesis), with 
inquiry into the original intent and meaning of 
the psalms, and interpretation of their con- 
temporary message. Requirements: study of S. 
Mowinckel, The Psalms in Israel's Worship. 
Read in at least two major commentaries for 
each class. Write an exegesis paper (to be pre- 
sented before the group), and a final examina- 
tion. 
Bjornard MWF 2: 10-3 Spring 

CTS CH 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 

areas of Old Testament studies. 

Staff TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 



B. NEW TESTAMENT 



BTS A-330 

Introduction to the New Testament 
This course is designed to give the student an in- 
troduction to the life, times, and message of the 
New Testament as the basis for further study 
and use. The total range of background, con- 
tent, text, canon, history of interpretation, and 
translation of the New Testament will come un- 
der study. This course or its equivalent is con- 
sidered prerequisite for all other courses in the 
New Testament field. 
Snyder MWF 2 : 10-3 : 00 Spring 

CTS CH 321 

The Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the thought of the authors of the 
Gospels and of the oral traditions which they 



39 



used. An attempt will be made to discover 
which traditions give evidence of the authentic 
historical ministry of Jesus. 
Scroggs WF 10 : 30-12 Spring 

CTS CH 322 

The Beginnings of Christian Theology 

A study of the history and thought of early 
Christianity from the emergence of the resurrec- 
tion faith to the early decades of the Second 
Century. 
Scroggs TT 9-10:30 Fall 

CTU BLL 305 

New Testament : Introduction 

The writings of the New Testament will be 
presented in their historical, cultural, religious 
and sociological context in the Greco-Roman 
world. Introduction to the methodological tools 
employed in New Testament research and to the 
diverse theologies that comprise the New 
Testament witness to Jesus of Nazareth. 
Karris MWF 11-11:50 Winter 

Senior W 2-4:30 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 307 

New Testament I : Pauline Writings 

Paul will be studied as a model of ministry : per- 
sonality, cultural background, call and mission, 
strategy with the Corinthians. Each of his 
writings will be viewed in its historical setting 
and background. Key concepts of Pauline 
Theology will be explored: death and resurrec- 
tion, body of Christ, salvation history, law and 
freedom, justification. Format will include lec- 
tures, readings, discussion and short written 
assignments. 
Thompson TT 10:30-11:45 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 304 

New Testament II : Mark-Matthew 

Intended to enable the student to move through 
a critical study to a post-critical appreciation of 
Mark and Matthew. Three parts (1) Mark: Jesus 
and the disciples, situation of the community, 
miracle-stories, the suffering of Man; (2) for- 
mation of the gospel tradition: source-criticism, 
form-criticism, the historical Jesus, redaction- 
criticism, composition-criticism; (3) Matthew: 
historical setting, mission to Israel, Jesus and the 
disciples, mission to the gentiles. Format will in- 
clude readings, lectures, discussion and short 
written assignment. 
Thompson TT 10 : 30-11 : 45 Winter 

LSTC NT 330 
Pauline Tradition 

Study of the content of the genuine Pauline 



epistles, within their historical setting and with 
attention to their original pupose and meaning. 
The Deutero-Pauline literature also will be con- 
sidered briefly. Life, theology, and ethics of 
Paul will be discussed. 
Linss MWF 11-11:50 Spring 

NETS BHT 575 (300 level] 
Romans 

This course seeks to lay a basic foundation for 
further biblical, exegetical, and theological 
study in terms of the analysis and interpretation 
of a key document of Christian faith. The 
courses will focus on an interpretation of the 
central themes in the Apostle's thought; consid- 
erable attention will be given to proper meth- 
ods and principles of biblical interpretation. Re- 
quirements include: working through a com- 
mentary, assigned thematic reading, a ten- 
page essay, and a final examination. No prere- 
quisites. 
Brauch MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Fall 

LSTC NT 320 
Gospel Tradition 

A study of the apostolic kerygma and the 
traditions witnessed to in the gospels. Special 
attention is given to the earliest ascertainable 
strata and their development. 
Voobus MWF 11-11:50 Winter 

MTS NT 302 (4) 
Jesus 

Introduction to the life and teaching of Jesus as 
determined by modern scholoarship. Special at- 
tention to methods of analysis. Recommended 
as a first course in the New Testament. 
Collins/Reeves WF 11-12:50 Spring 

MTS NT 303 (4) 
Paul 

Introduction to the generative insights which 

Paul preached in his inimitable way. 

Reeves TT 12-1:50 Fall 

NBTS BHT 560 [300 level] 
New Testament Introduction 
This course is designed to provide a basis on 
which continued and deepening fruitful study 
of the New Testament can be built. It intro- 
duces students both to the context and content 
of the New Testament, as well as to the meth- 
odological issues involved in its study. Require- 
ments include periodic tests, participation in 
class-projects, and assigned exercises in the 
methodology of N.T. study. No prerequisites. 
Brauch MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Spring 



40 



BTS A-332 

New Testament Theology 

A study of the various theologies of the New 
Testament with special emphasis on Paul and 
John. The course is also designed to demon- 
strate the role of the books of the New 
Testament in the several theological traditions. 
Snyder MWF 11:30-12:20 Fall 

LSTC RE 342 

The Bible and Christian Education 

For course description consult Religious 

Education offerings. 

Norquist MWF 12-12: 50 Spring 

DEAN Bbl 450 
Gospel Literature I 

A study of the development and themes in the 
Gospel literature with emphasis on the Synop- 
tics. The course will cover the historical 
development of the literature, various systems 
for interpreting it, a survey of the Synoptics and 
a development of selected theological themes. 
Book reports and a scholarly paper will be 
required. Opportunity will be provided for 
those who wish to translate their academic work 
into popular communication in lay discussion 
groups. 

Fischer MWF 10-10:50 Winter 

Rousseau TBAn Winter 

DEAN Bbl 451 
Gospel Literature II 

A study of the development and themes in the 
Gospel literature with emphasis on the Synop- 
tics. The course will cover the historical 
development of the literature, various systems 
for interpreting it, a survey of the Synoptics and 
a development of selected theological themes. 
Book reports and a scholarly paper will be 
required. Opportunity will be provided for 
those who wish to translate their academic work 
into popular communication in lay discussion 
groups. 

Fischer MWF 10-10:50 Spring 

Rousseau TBAn Spring 

GTS CH 422 

The Mission and Proclamation of Jesus 

A study of the ministry and message of Jesus by 
means of a critical evaluation of the gospel 
traditions. Special attention will be given to a) 
the possibility of knowledge about Jesus and b) 
the question of the relevance of the historical 
Jesus for the Christian Faith. 
Scroggs TT 9-10:30 Winter 



JSTC DIVN 414 

Jesus in the New Testament 

A study of the development of New Testament 
thought on the person and mission of Jesus, in 
terms both of the Christological titles and of 
evolving patterns of Christology. A form- 
critical analysis of Gospel materials to deter- 
mine the basis of Christology in Jesus' self- 
understanding; a study of Christological for- 
mulations from the primitive Palestinian 
church, from the Judaeo-Hellenistic church, and 
from the mission to the pagan world. Prere- 
quisite: Basic level courses on the Gospels. 
Mally TBAn Spring 

LSTC NT 440 
Parables of Jesus 

Exegetical studies in the parables. 

Voobus MWF 12-12:50 Winter 

LSTC NT 421 

Ethical Teachings of the Evangelists 

A study of the conception of the Christian life 
according to each of the four evangelists, in- 
cluding both approach and concrete directions 
for Christian behavior. 
Norquist MWF 11-11:50 Fall 

LSTC NT 432 
Synoptic Pericopes 

Exegetical studies in the Synoptic texts ac- 
cording to the new pericope series. 
Voobus MWF 11-11:50 Fall 

CTU BLL 430 

The Gospel Accoring to Matthew 

Within the structure and the purpose of the 
Gospel, Matthew will be studied as a Pastor in 
his community in applying Jesus' teaching to his 
own situation. 

Langerholz MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

LSTC NT 422 
Studies in Mark 

The course will include a study of the place of 
Mark within the primitive Christian com- 
munity, historical and theological inquiries into 
the Markan kerygma, as well as an analysis of 
its basic themes. 

Voobus MWF 12-12: 50 Fall 

NBTS BHT 571 [400 level] 
Interpreting Mark's Gospel 
The purpose of this course is to arrive at a 
deeper understanding of Mark's Gospel for 
devotion, instruction, and preaching through a 
careful exploration of its text and the 
theological significance of Mark's work. 
Meye W 7-9 : 15 pm Fall 



41 



BTS A-432 

The Gospel of Luke 

Since Luke and Acts are two parts of a single 
work comprising one-fourth of the New 
Testament, special attention will be given to the 
relationship of Luke to Acts. A careful, exegeti- 
cal analysis of the text of this Gospel will be 
supplemented by a study of Luke's theology. 
Wieand MTWTF 9-12 Sept. 10-23 

CTU BLL 435 

The Gospel According to Luke 

Introduction to form and redaction criticism. 
Exegesis of the entire gospel with special refer- 
ence to the most recent and the most significant 
redaction critical studies. Luke's place in the 
theologies of the Early Church. 
Karris MWF 12-12:50 Spring 

CTU BLL 440 

The Gospel According to John 

A critical-exegetical approach to John's text to 
arrive at his sources and to evaluate his 
theology, particularly on the mission of the Son 
and the Church. 

Langerholz MWF 12-12:50 Winter 

Karris MWF 11-11:50 Spring 

DEAN Bbl 413 
Apostolic Literature I 

A study of the writings in the Canon from Acts 
to Jude. The course will investigate the 
historical circumstances in which this literature 
arose and various theological themes (e.g., 
development of "church," Pauline concept of 
freedom, wisdom influences in apostolic 
literature, etc) which manifested themselves in 
historical development. Book reviews and a 
scholarly paper are required. Opportunity is of- 
fered for translating academic work into 
popular communication by participation in lay 
discussion groups. 
Fischer MWF 8-8:50 Winter 

DEAN BBL 414 
Apostolic Literature II 

A study of the writings in the Canon from Acts 
to Jude. The course will investigate the 
historical circumstances in which this literature 
arose and various theological themes (e.g., 
development of "church," Pauline concept of 
freedom, wisdom influences in apostolic 
literature, etc.) which manifested themselves in 
the historical development. Book reviews and a 
scholarly paper are required. Opportunity is of- 
fered for translating academic work into 



popular communication by participation in lay 

discussion groups. 

Fischer MWF 10-10:50 Spring 

MTS NT 415 (4) 

The Acts: Early Christian Theology as Narra- 
tive 

An exegetical study of the Acts of the Apostles. 
Some of the themes with which the course will 
be concerned: How does Luke mold together 
tradition, history and his own original composi- 
tion to reflect a developing theology and mis- 
sion in the first century? What contributions 
does he himself make to the early church's 
understanding of itself? What can this mean for 
Christians today? 
Hilgert M 7-10 pm Fall 

CTU BLL 450 
Pauline Theology 

Origin and development of main Pauline themes 
in the light of Paul's experience as well as the 
theological and cultural traditions and theologi- 
cal disputes of his time. Implications for minis- 
try. 
Spilly MWF 10-10:50 Winter 

MTS NT 412 (4) 
Romans 

A course in exegesis. 



Reeves 



MW2-3:50 



Winter 



MTS NT 416 (4) 
I Corinthians 

Exegetical study of the theological, ethical and 
social issues which Paul disputed with the Cor- 
inthians. Greek is not required but an opportun- 
ity will be given for its use. 
Collins WF 11-12:50 Fall 

BTS A-434 

First and Second Corinthians 

Selections from the Corinthian correspondence 

in order to study the life and faith of Paul and 

the nature of the apostolic church, as such a 

study relates to the church of the twentieth 

century. 

Snyder MWF 11 : 30-12 : 20 Spring 

CTU BLL 455 
Pauline Exegesis 

Methodology used in the exegesis of a Pauline 
epistle. Paul's theological and cultural milieu. 
Detailed exegesis of the entire epistle. The 
epistles treated differ from year to year. Of- 
fered 1975-76: 1-2 Thessalonians, Philippians, 
Galatians. 
Karris MWF 11-11:50 Fall 



42 



NBTS BHT 556 [400 level! 
Greek Exegesis : Galatians 

The concern of the course is to develop the skill 
of students in Greek exegesis. To that end, 
attention will be given to the building of Greek 
vocalulary, increasing competence in the under- 
standing of Greek syntax, and the doing of exe- 
gesis. Within this process, attention will be 
given to the theology of the text. Requirements 
include in-class reading and translating, the 
preparation and presentation of several brief 
exegesis papers, and periodic evaluations. Pre- 
requisite: At least one year of Greek (or its 
equivalent). 
Brauch MWF 1 : 10-2 Winter 

MTS NT 417 (4) 
Ephesians 

An exegesis course on the book of Ephesians. 
Greek is not required, but opportunity will be 
given for its use. 
Collins TT 11-12:50 Spring 

BTS A-413 
Greek Exegesis 

A study of a selected book of the New Testa- 
ment according to the Greek text. The book to 
be studied will be announced in advance. Pre- 
requisite: two quarters of Greek. 
Gardner W 3 : 30-6 Spring 

MTS NT 410 (4) 

Jewish Apocalyptic Literature 

Introduction to Daniel and to the intertesta- 
mental Jewish apocalypses. Special attention 
to views of history and symbolic language. 
Collins MTh 2-3:50 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 405 

The Birth and Development of Christianity in 

First-Century Palestine and Syria 

The course focuses on Christianity as a socio- 
religious reality. Emphasis is placed on the 
development and diffusion of Christianity 
against the background of the various forms of 
Jewish life on the eastern edge of the Roman em- 
pire. Special treatment is given to the structur- 
ing of the community, its theological reflection, 
political attitudes and economic policies. Pre- 
requisites: New Testament survey or equiva- 
lent. Format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: 
short research assignments in preparation for 
class discussion; other assignments to be nego- 
tiated. 
LaVerdiere M 2-4 : 45 Spring 



MTS NT 422 (4) 

The Idea and Function of Sacrament in New 

Testament Times 

Consideration of the symbolic significance of 
early Christian baptism and eucharist with at- 
tention to their personal and social appeal. 
Early Christian sacramental symbolism will be 
compared and contrasted with that of the mys- 
teries of Dionysus, Isis and Mithra. Special at- 
tention will be given to feminine symbolism 
and to the role of women. 
Collins TT 11-12:50 Winter 

NBTS BHT 562 [400 level) 
New Testament Theology 

The goals of this course are: 1) to introduce 
important themes in N.T. theology; 2) to intro- 
duce major texts for understanding key themes 
in N.T. theology; 3) to provide models for 
exegeting N.T. texts; 4) to effect awareness of 
and acquaintance with significant literature in 
the field of N.T. theology. The focus through- 
out the course ~ in the treatment of themes 
and texts ~ is on the dynamic of "unity and di- 
versity" in N.T. theology. Requirements include 
periodic take-home exams to provide oppor- 
tunity for reflection on the material covered 
in the class sessions, annotated reading logs, 
and a 15-20 page research essay. Prerequisite: 
A basic course in N.T. Introduction. 
Brauch WF8-9:15 Fall 

LSTC NT 418 

Resurrection in the New Testament 

A study of the resurrection tradition and the 
significance of the resurrection for New Testa- 
ment faith. 
Norquist TT 12-1: 15 Winter 

CTU BLL 490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

The attitude of the Bible towards the outside 
world will be investigated for direction in the 
world mission of the Church today. In the Old 
Testament special attention will be devoted to 
the cultural and moral interdependency of 
Israel with the nations as well as to such motifs 
as election, universalism of salvation and mon- 
otheism. New Testament study will focus on the 
missionary discourses of the Gospels, and ex- 
amine the practical challenges to the Church's 
mission as reflected in Acts and the epistles. 
Senior/Stuhlmueller Tu 7-9:30 pm Fall 



43 



JSTC DIVN 494 

Social Consciousness, Scripture and the Spiri- 
tual Exercises of Saint Ignatius Loyola 

The aim is to study Sacred Scripture and the 
Spiritual Exercises from the viewpoint of social 
awareness today. How do these documents 
from the past enable us to develop a spirituality 
concerned with social issues? Format: lecture 
and discussion. Prerequisites: introductory 
Scripture and background in systematic/funda- 
mental theology. Short written assignments to 
be determined. Admission only by approval of 
instructors. 
Doyle/Thompson M 2-4:45 Fall 

CTS CH 521 

New Testament Seminar I: The Theology of 

Mark 

An investigation of the Book of Mark as an 
integrated tract of theological literature. Pre- 
requisite: CH 321 or equivalent. 
Scroggs MW3:30-5 Fall 

NETS BHT 573 
The Gospel of John 

It is the purpose of this course to discern the 
Johannine understanding of Jesus and to deal 
with the implications this understanding has for 
faith and ministry. Toward this end, the course 
will move from an initial consideration of the 
historical-critical issues raised by the Gospel, 
through a consideration of historical setting, 
structure, and purpose of the Evangelist, to an 
exegetical examination of representative texts, 
with a view to understanding the message and 
challenge of the Gospel. The format of the 
course consists of lecture input and class dis- 
cussion. Requirements are: class participation 
on the basis of assigned readings and the inten- 
sive use of a major commentary, and a major 
research paper. Prerequisite: at least an intro- 
ductory N.T. course. 
Brauch MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Winter 

BTS A-530 
Johannine Theology 

Through exegetical studies in the Gospel of 
John, the nature of Johannine theology will be 
examined. Comparisons will be made with 
Pauline theology and the synoptics. An ac- 
quaintance with the synoptic material will be 
a prerequisite. 
Snyder MWF 2 : 10-3 Fall 

CTS CH 522 

New Testament Seminar II 

A study of some significant aspect of the life 



or thought of early Christianity. In 1976, Chris- 
tian Experience, Fellowship and Community 
in the Early Church. Prerequisite: CH 321 or 
equivalent. 
Scroggs MF 9-10: 30 Winter 

CTS CH 523 

New Testament Seminar III 

The Church and World in early Christian 
thought. A study of the views early Christians 
held toward non-believers, secular and religious 
culture, and the state in the light of their faith 
in the Lordship of Christ. Prerequisite: CH 321 
or equivalent. 

Scroggs WF 3:30-5 Spring 

NBTS BHT 563 
The Parables of Jesus 

Concerned with a study of the synoptic parables 
in terms of: 1) their significance in Jesus' total 
ministry; 2) their importance in disclosing Jesus' 
understanding of his mission; 3) their place in 
the life and faith of the early church and in the 
teaching of the evangelist; and 4) their signi- 
ficance for the faith and life of the contempo- 
rary church. Requirements include several com- 
parative studies of synoptic parables, reading 
reports, and final evaluation. Prerequisite: 
introductory courses in N.T. and/or the Gos- 
pels. 
Brauch TT 1 : 10-2 : 25 Spring 

CTU BLL 532 

Faith and Suffering: The Gospel Accounts of 

the Death of Jesus 

This seminar will examine the four gospel ac- 
counts of the death of Jesus, seeking to appre- 
ciate how each gospel community was able to 
reflect on the death of Jesus in the light of its 
traditions and faith experience. Participants 
in the seminar will be invited to use the skills 
of form and redaction criticism to analyze the 
gospel texts, and to evaluate their potential for 
contemporary proclamation. 
Senior M 7-9 : 30 pm Spring 

CTU BLL 535 

The Resurrection Texts in the Gospels and St. 

Paul 

The biblical background of the theme of resur- 
rection. The hermeneutic of the empty tomb 
and apparitions. 
Langerholz MWF 11-11:50 Spring 

LSTC NT 538 

The Kingdom of God in the Synoptic Gospels 

This course attempts to determine the mean- 
ing of the term Kingdom of God as it was used 



44 



by Jesus and the synoptic evangelists. Its back- 
ground in prophecy and apocalyptic is ex- 
plored. Related concepts, both messianic and 
eschatological, receive attention. The relation- 
ship of Kingdom of God to Church and to 
Christian living is investigated in some depth. 
Norquist Th 2-4:30 Winter 

GTS CH 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 

areas of New Testament studies. 

Staff TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 



C. BIBLICAL LANGUAGES 

BTS A-311A 

NBTS BHT 501 [300 levell 

Hebrew I 

The elementary aspects of Hebrew will be treat- 
ed with the expectation that the student will 
gain knowledge of the strong verbs and of the 
uses of the article, the adjective, the demon- 
stratives, pronouns, and nouns. Exercises and 
readings will be based on biblical Hebrew 
taken from Genesis 1-3 with translation helps. 
Neff MWF 1 : 10-2 Fall 

BTS A-311B 

NBTS BHT 502 [300 level] 

Hebrew II 

Emphasis will be given to the weak verbs and 
the acquisition of a working vocabulary for 
reading Hebrew narrative. Those passages of 
particular theological significance in the Book 
of Genesis will be translated with reference to 
exegetical technique. 
Neff MWF 1:10-2 Winter 

BTS A-311C 

NBTS BHT 503 [300 level) 

Hebrew III 

The concern of the course is to develop the 
skills of the student in Hebrew exegesis with 
supplementary work in Hebrew syntax. At- 
tention will be given either to a book from the 
Pentateuch or from the Latter Prophets. 
Neff MWF 1:10-2 Spring 

CTU BLL 325 
Introductory Hebrew 

An introductory course for those who have 

not previously studied Hebrew. 

Fox MWF 2-2: 50 Winter 



CTU BLL 326 
Intermediate Hebrew 

Description available upon request. 

Staff TBAr Upon Request 

DEAN Lan 301, 304, 307 (9) 

Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Hebrew 

Tutorial method. 

Rousseau TBAr Upon Request 

LSTC OT 300 
Elementary Hebrew 

Introduction to Hebrew. The course will be 
taught with the special needs in mind of the stu- 
dent who recognizes the knowledge of Hebrew 
to be essential for the study of scripture and 
theology. 
Michel MWF 8-8:50 Fall 

MTS OT 322 (4) 

Introduction to Exegesis of the Hebrew Bible II 

The second quarter of introduction to Hebrew 
Exegesis of the Old Testament. Involves con- 
tinuation of introductory grammatical study, 
translation, and exegesis of selected passages, 
primarily prose. Prerequisite: introduction to 
the elements of Hebrew grammar in another 
Cluster course and conference with instructor. 
Campbell TWTF 11-11:50 Spring 

CTU BLL 320 
Biblical Greek 

This course is designed to meet the needs of 
students who have little or no knowledge of 
Biblical Greek. 
K arris MTh 7 : 30-8 : 45 pm Fall 

CTU BLL 321 
Intermediate Greek 

Description available upon request. 

Staff TBAr Upon Request 

DEAN Lan 361, 364, 2>(>7 (9) 

Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Greek 

Tutorial method. 

Rousseau TBAr Upon Request 

LSTC NT 200 [300 level for other schools] 
New Testament Greek 

A programmed study of the Greek of the New 
Testament, using the language lab and aiming 
at the utilization of the language for exegesis. 
Linss MWF 8-8:50 Fall 

MTS NT 321/322 (8) 

Introduction to New Testament Greek I & II 

A non-divisible two-quarter study of elemen- 
tary Greek grammar, practice in translation. 



45 



with introductory attention to exegesis. 

Reeves TWTF 9-9:50 Fall/Winter 

BTS B-316A, B, C 

NBTS BHT 551, 552, 553 [300 level) 

Elements of New Testament Greek 

In this course the student acquires a knowledge 
of the elements of grammar, a working vocabu- 
lary, and skill in translation of the Greek New 
Testament. Selections from the Gospels, Acts, 
Paul and the General Epistles will be read. 
Staff MWF 1:10-2 Fall/Winter/Spring 



D. JEWISH STUDIES 



MTS NT 410 (4) 

Jewish Apocalyptic Literature 

For course description consult 

offerings. 

Collins MTh 2-3:50 



New Testament 



Fall 



JSTC DIVN 405 

The Birth and Development of Christianity in 

First-Century Palestine and Syria 

For course description consult New Testament 

offerings. 

LaVerdiere M 2-4:45 Spring 

CTS CH 493 

An Inquiry into Contemporary Judaism 

Study of a selected aspect of Jewish life and 
culture in the 20th century and an assessment of 
the Jewish experience and insight for man to- 
day. The selected aspect will be announced 
each time the course is offered. Topic for 1976: 
The Holocaust. 
Lacocque MW 10:30-12 Winter 

CTU BLL 524 

Readings in Rabbinic Literature 

Texts to be selected. 

Perelmuter Th2-4:30 Spring 

CTU BLL 526 

Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

An examination of the nature of Rabbinic 
Judaism out of which Christianity emerged 
and with which Christianity co-existed over 
the centuries. An effort at achieving an insight 
into the approach and the mind of Rabinic Juda- 
ism through an examination of the pertinent 
literature. 
Perelmuter Th 10 : 30-12 : 30 Fall 



CTU BLL 529 

Jewish Mysticism and Messianism 

With special reference to Sabbatai Sevi. A 
close examination of the mystical substratum 
of Jewish historical and religious experience 
through a study in depth of the Sabbatian 
movement of the 17th century. This course will 
trace the stream of mystical thought and experi- 
ence from the Talmudic period, medieval mysti- 
cism and the culmination in Lurianic Kabbala 
and the emergence of the Sabbatian movement 
in the mid-seventeenth century. 
Perelmuter Th2-4:30 Fall 

CTU BLL 520 

Liturgy of the Synagogue I 

The tri-partite course on the Liturgy of the 
Synagogue—over a two year period-surveys 
worship forms in the contemporary American 
Synagogue with special reference to the coTr\- 
mon thread and variations in the Jewish de- 
nominations: Orthodox, Conservative, and Re- 
form. This first section deals with the weekly 
synagogue service. 
Perelmuter Th 10 : 30-12- : 30 Spring 



II. HISTORICAL STUDIES 
A. GENERAL 

CTS CH 491 

Contrasting Philosophies of History 

A study of Augustine's Christian prototype. 
The City of God, in contrast and comparison 
with more recent philosophies of history to be 
selected by the seminar participants. Evaluation 
for relevance and formulation of a viable stance 
today will be attempted. 
Manschreck TT 9-10: 30 Fall 

MTS H 430 (4) 

Seminar in Eastern Orthodox Christianity 

A survey of the history of Eastern Orthodoxy 
from the Byzantine period with special atten- 
tion to selected theological motifs and prob- 
lems. 
Rigdon Th 2-4:50 Winter 

BTS B-449 

Research Methods in Church History 

Practical training in research techniques and 



46 



sharpening of the critical spirit through gui- 
dance on individual projects. 
Durnbaugh/ Wagner Th 3:30-6 Fall 

CTS CH 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 

areas of Church History. 

Staff TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 



B. EARLY CHURCH 

CTS CH 341 

Christianity in the World: The History of the 

Christian People I 

This course, designed specifically for those who 
have had little or no church history, seeks to 
depict and interpret the Christian community's 
development in interaction with the world. 
Lectures and discussions will center upon key 
figures, critical events, forces of change and re- 
action, and the main conceptions which have 
defined the character of the Christian com- 
munity in its interaction with successive 
stages of our culture from the early church 
through the early medieval developments. 
Manschreck MWF 11-11: 50 Winter 

CTU HDS 300 
Early Christianity 

The development of Christian doctrine and 
practice to 450 A.D. Topics will include 
methods of interpreting scripture, the develop- 
ment of Trinitarian doctrine, the understand- 
ing of the redemptive work of Christ, the 
growth of Church structures and sacramental 
practice. Lecture, with assigned readings and 
reports or major papers. 
Burns MWF 11-11:50 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 315 
Early Christianity 

The development of Christian doctrine and 
practice to 450 A.D. Topics will include 
methods of interpreting Scripture, development 
of trinitarian doctrine, understanding of the 
redemptive work of Christ, growth of Church 
structures, and sacramental practice. A seminar 
with weekly readings and reports (alternative 
to lecture course, CTU HDS 300). 
Burns MW2-3:15 Fall 

LSTC HT 311A 

Ancient and Medieval Church History 

The developing life and thought of the Chris- 
tian Church, presented in broad perspective. 



Lectures and group discussions of selected 

source readings. 

Fischer MWF 12-12 : 50 Winter 

LSTC HT 311B 

Studies in Ancient and Medieval Church His- 
tory 

An introduction to these periods through a con- 
centration on a few major events and leaders: 
the Councils of Necaea and Chalcedon, Augus- 
tine, and Aquinas. Seminar method. (An alter- 
native to HT 311A) 
Burns TT 10:30-11 : 45 Winter 

NETS CHT 501 [300 level) 
Early and Medieval Christianity 

Major issues and developments in Christian life 
and thought from the beginning of the second 
century to the Reformation are examined in 
order (1) to become familiar with the develop- 
ment of Christianity during this period; (2) to 
acquire some knowledge of historical metho- 
dology, and; (3) to develop some ability at 
analyzing and interpreting religious movements. 
Regular and intensive reading, both in primary 
and secondary sources, is emphasized as a basis 
for meaningful classroom discussion. 
Ohlmann MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Fall 

DEAN Hst 407 

History of Church to 700 A.D. 

An introduction to patristic thought, especially 
as it applies to major beliefs of the Christian 
religion. A survey of the socio-political climate 
of the period and the effect it had on the 
development of Church structures. 
Hartenbach MW 9-9:50 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 405 

The Birth and Development of Christianity in 

First Century Palestine and Syria 

For course desceiption consult New Testament 

offerings. 

LaVerdiere M 2-4: 45 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 415 
Christian Spirituality 

A historical study of early Christian 
spirituality: martyrdom, consecrated virginity, 
early mysticism, asceticism, monasticism, and 
the sacramental piety of the congregations. 
Among the writers to be considered are Greg- 
ory of Nyssa, Augustine, and John Cassian. 
Concentration will be on primary sources with 
reading and discussion. Paper required. 
Bums TT 9-10: 15 Winter 



47 



CTU BLL 526 

Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

For course description consult Jewish Studies 

offerings. 

Perelmuter Th 10:30-12:30 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 520 
Augustinian Theology 

Investigation of Augustine's theological anthro- 
pology with concentration on the issues of mor- 
ality, ignorance, concupiscence, freedom, and 
sin. A research seminar with concentration on 
primary materials. Paper required. 
Burns WF2-3:15 Spring 



C. MEDIEVAL 



of Athanasius and Anselm focusing primarily 

upon Athanasius' De Incarnatione and An- 
selm's Cur Deus Homo. 

Rigdon W 2-4: 50 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 426 

Christ in the Theology of Thomas Aquinas 

Lectures and seminar sessions on the person 
and work of Christ in the Summa of Theology 
of St. Thomas Aquinas. Special attention will 
be given to Aquinas' theology of the mysteries 
of Christ: life, death, resurrection, and glorifi- 
cation. The teaching on Christ will be studied 
in the historical and systematic context of 
Aquinas' overall theology. A paper and several 
class reports; written or oral exam. 
Montague M 3:30-5:30 Winter 



CTU HDS 307 

The Christianization of Europe 

A study of the Church's encounter with the 
Barbarian nations, of their conversion, and of 
the development of Christian life. An analysis 
of how the task affected Church life and 
thought, and of how the Church affected the 
world. Major consideration will be given to: 
Medieval Missions; Charlemagne; the Papal 
States; the Schism between East and West; 
and the development and experience of a Chris- 
tian European Culture (theology, philosophy, 
social and political structures). 
Nemer MWF 12-12: 50 Winter 

DEAN Hst 409 

History of Church : 700 to 1500 

Intellectual development and structuring of 
Christian thought. The development of the pap- 
acy and the structures of the Church within 
the context of Christendom. 
Hartenbach MF 8-8: 50 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 417 
Christian Spirituality II 

A study of medieval and early modern Chris- 
tian spirituality: monastic renewal, mendicant 
reform, English mysticism, the devotio 
moderna, and Ignatian teaching. Among the 
writers to be considered are Bernard of Clair- 
vaux, Bonaventure, and Thomas a Kempis. 
Concentration will be on primary sources, 
with reading and discussion. Paper required. 
Montague TT 9-10:15 Spring 

MTS H 422 

Seminar in Historical Theology: Athanasius 

and Anselm 

A comparative critical study of the theologies 



D. REFORMATION 

CTS CH 342 

Christianity in the World: The History of the 

Christian People II 

A continuation of CH 341. Special attention 
will be given to late medieval and renaissance 
developments, the conciliar movement, the Re- 
formation, the Counter-Reformation, the Ana- 
baptists, and emerging new forms of Christian 
expression. 
Manschreck TT 9-10 : 30 Spring 

CTU HDS 310 

Christianity in the Renaissance and Reformation 

Factors influencing the breakdown of the medi- 
eval synthesis. Renaissance thought and style 
chiefly in relationship to the Church. Writings 
of the Reformers, and the position of Trent. 
Nemer MWF 10-10:50 Spring 

LSTC HT 312A 

Reformation and Modern Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and Modern 
Church History outside America, designed to 
show in broad perspective the movements 
which have shaped world Christianity in our 
time. Lectures and group discussions of selected 
source readings. 
Fischer MWF 12-12:50 Spring 

LSTC HT 314 

The Lutheran Heritage 

Content and scope of the Lutheran confessional 
writings and the manner in which they are nor- 
mative for Lutheran ministry and church life 



48 



today. Recent confessional statements and re- 
sults of inter-confessional dialogues are taken 
into account. 

Scherer MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

Braaten MWF 11-11:50 Spring 

NBTS CHT 502 (300 level] 
Reformation and Modern Christianity 

Major issues and developments in Christian 
life and thought from the time of the Reforma- 
tion to the present are examined in order (1) 
to better understand contemporary expres- 
sions of Christianity; (2) to acquire some know- 
ledge of historical methodology; and (3) to de- 
velop ability at interpreting religious move- 
ments and evaluating the significance of past 

I movements for today. Regular and intensive 
reading, both in primary and secondary sour- 
ces, is emphasized as a basis for meaningful 

j classroom discussion. 

I Ohlmann MWF 11:30-12:20 Winter 

DEAN Hst 410 

History of Church From 1500 

The fragmentation of Christendom and new 
' theological thought. The Church on the de- 
I fensive in the Age of the Enlightenment and the 

Revolutionary Age. The attempts of the 

Church to cope with the modern age. 

Hartenbach MW 10-10:50 Spring 

LSTC HT 411 
Theology of Luther 

The purpose of this elementary seminar is to 
introduce the student to (1) Luther's theology 
in its broad comprehensiveness and its dynamic 
thrust, and (2) the tools and methods for the 
critical study of Luther. Selected works in vari- 
ous categories are discussed in class. The stu- 
dent reads other works of his own choosing, 
and prepares a term paper. 
Fischer WF2-3:15 Fall 

LSTC HT 417 
Luther on Baptism 

An advanced seminar analyzing Luther's suc- 
cessive works dealing with baptism. This in- 
volves some attention to virtually the whole 
fabric of Luther's theology, and to a properly 
critical method for the study of Luther. Term 
paper. Prerequisite: Some previous study in 
Reformation history. 
Fischer WF2-3:15 Winter 

MTS H 401 

Theology of John Calvin 

A systematic study of Calvin's theology as 



seen mainly in the Institutes of the Christian 

ReUgion. 

Rigdon Th 2-4:50 Fall 

BTS B-456 

Luther, Calvin and Wesley 

The works of these three men will offer an op- 
portunity to compare major types of Protes- 
tant theology. At the same time, the unifying 
strands will constitute an intensive introduc- 
tion to the main motifs of classical Protestant- 
ism. 
Brown MWF 2: 10-3 Winter 

CTS CH 561 

The Catholic Counter Reformation 

A seminar on 16th century renewal and reac- 
tion in Roman Catholicism, particularly internal 
reform, the Jesuits, and the Council of Trent, 
and their continuing significance. 
Manschreck WF 1:30-3 Fall 



E. MODERN 

BTS B-340 

The Believers' Church 

A study of the meaning, rise, and develop- 
ment of the Free Church tradition within Chris- 
tianity from the Reformation to the present 
day, and its implication for contemporary 
churches. 
Durnbaugh MWF 2: 10-3 Fall 

CTSCH367(iy2) 

History and Polity of the United Church of 

Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology and 
practices of the United Church of Christ, in- 
cluding its antecedents: the Congregational 
Christian Churches and the Evangelical and 
Reformed Church. 
Rooks M 1 : 30-3 Spring 

CTS CH 390 

An Inquiry Into Methodism 

A study of the history and theology of 

Methodism, especially as expressed in John 

Wesley. 

Manschreck M W 1 : 30-3 Spring 

MTS CA 309 

Polity, Politics, Presbyterianism 

For course description consult Organization 



49 



and Administration offerings. 
Worley M 2-4 : 50 



Fall 



CTS CH 393 

Women in the Protestant Tradition: Historical 

Sketches 

A look at the active role of women in the his- 
tory of Protestantism through autobiography 
and biography. Particular emphasis will be 
placed upon significant American women. 
Initial session at CTS. 
Zikmund Th 2-5 Spring 

BTS B-448 

Seminar: Quaker Thought and Life 

An encounter with Quakerism through reading 
primary sources of such leaders as Fox, Bar- 
clay, Woolman and others. 
Brown Th 7-9:30 pm Spring 

BTS B-457 

Brethren in Theological Perspective 

Theological presuppositions of Brethren his- 
toriography and development will be examined, 
and present theological trends will be traced. 
The doctrines and practices of the Brethren 
will be discussed in dialog with contemporary 
thought. Current issues will be delineated. 
Brown MWF 10:30-11:20 Fall 

BTS B-466 

The Church, The State and War 

Readings focused on the traditional and current 
Christian attitudes toward the state and prob- 
lems of peace and war. 
Durnbaugh MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Spring 

BTS B-442 

The Ecumenical Movement 

A study of the movements toward unity and 
cooperation since the Reformation, with pri- 
mary consideration given to twentieth-century 
activity. 
Durnbaugh WF8-9:20 Spring 

CTU HDS 422 

19th Century Imperialism and World Mission 

A study of the Church as it encounters the new 
world born of the French Revolution, of how it 
affects and is affected by social and political 
considerations, of imperialism (Church and 
State), and of the missionary expansion in the 
late 19th and early 20th centuries. Major con- 
siderations will be given to: the Church's en- 
counter with French and Italian political liber- 
alism, with German philosophical and theologi- 
cal liberalism, with English scientific and poli- 
tical liberalism; the Church's response in the 



Syllabus of Errors and Vatican I; Europe in 
Asia and Africa; Mission as Structure; the hesi- 
tant growth of local Churches; a western Chris- 
tianity in a non- western world. 
Nemer TT 10 : 30-11 : 45 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 454 

John Henry Newman : Prophetic Figure of Con- 
temporary Catholicism 

This course will attempt to give the student a 
better grasp of the present-day issues of Roman 
Catholicism by studying the writings of Cardi- 
nal Newman in historical perspective. Study of 
Newman's thought on development of doctrine, 
authority and the consensus fidelium, pluralism 
in Catholic thought, the role of the laity, Catho- 
licism and acculturation, and faith as a personal 
act. Students may follow their own interests in 
readings. A report on these will be submitted 
weekly. Two weeks allowed for a final synthetic 
exam from the readings. 
Ross W 3:30-5:30 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 422 

Roman Catholicism : The Last Hundred Years 

This course aims to give those in the ministry 
of the church an understanding of historical 
dimensions of present-day Catholicism. We 
will treat the following questions: What were 
the revolutionary ideas of John Henry New- 
man? What cultural forces of the nineteenth 
century influenced Vatican I? The pontificate 
of Leo XIII: progress or reaction? How did the 
modernist crisis affect the church? Vatican II: 
solution or new problem? Catholic Americans 
or American Catholics? Students may follow 
their own interests in readings. A report on 
these will be submitted weekly. Two weeks 
allowed for a final synthetic exam from the 
readings. 
Ross W 3:30-5:30 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 421 

History of the Society of Jesus 

A study of the main events of Jesuit history 
with emphasis on the Society before the sup- 
pression. Topics will include the foundation 
and early generals; Jesuit involvement in mis- 
sions, education, and theological controversy; 
the suppression and restoration. Students may 
follow their own interests in readings. A report 
on these will be submitted weekly. Two weeks 
allowed for a final synthetic exam from the 
readings. 
Ross W 3:30-5:30 Fall 



50 



MTS H 411 (4) 

Protestant Thought in Britain in the Nine- 
teenth Century 

Important men, movements and theologies 
in both Establishment and Dissent. A major 
theme will be the religious response to philo- 
sophical, scientific, and industrial develop- 
ments. 
Schafer WF 11-12:50 Winter 

NETS CHT 553 [400 level! 

The British Evangelical Theological Tradition 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Nelson Th 7-9:30 pm Winter 

MTS T 419 (4) 

The Theology of Schleiermacher 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Parker M 2-4: 50 Fall 

MTS H 423 (4) 

Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Russian 

Religious Thought 

A study of selected writings and themes from 
major figures in the history of the Russian reli- 
gious renaissance, beginning with Alexei 
Khomiakov and extending to Nicholas Ber- 
dyaev. 
Rigdon Th 2-4 : 50 Spring 

BTS B-541 

Seminar in Modern Church History: The Con- 
fessing Church 

Selected topics will be investigated in succes- 
sive years, for example, church-state problems, 
church-renewal activities, or the German 
Kirchenkampf . 
Durnbaugh Th 7-9:30 pm Winter 

CTS CH 562 
The Free Church 

A seminar on the historical significance of the 
free churches from the 16th century Restitution- 
ists through radical Puritanism, Pietism, and the 
Evangelical Awakening to the modern pattern 
of religious liberty and voluntaryism. 
Manschreck TTl-2:30 Winter 

NBTS CHT 506 
Baptist Thought 

An examination of characteristic Baptist em- 
phases in theology, polity, and practice for the 
purpose of establishing our Baptist identity on 
the one hand and clarifying our commonality 
with the larger free church tradition on the 



other. Requirements: to be determined. 
Ohlmann MF 3: 10-4: 25 Winter 

NBTS CHT 512 
Protestant Evangelicalism 

A study of the evangelical tradition in Protes- 
tanism through an investigation of its develop- 
ment in the thought of the mainline reformers, 
Anabaptists, Puritans in England and America, 
German Pietists, John Wesley, the Evangelicals 
in England, 18th and 19th century American 
Evangelicals, and the New Evangelicals. Stu- 
dent research of the subject and preparation of 
a final evaluative paper will constitute a signi- 
ficant part of the course. 
Ohlmann MWF2:10-3 Spring 



F. AMERICAN 

BTS B-345 
Civil Religion 

Although church and state are separated by law 
in the United States, there is widely held ad- 
herence to a religion of the nation. Since the 
time of the Puritans, Americans have tended 
to think of themselves as God's chosen people. 
This faith-stance will be studied through typical 
literary expressions and some recent interpreta- 
tions. 
Durnbaugh Th 9 : 30-12 Winter 

CTS CH 385 

Major Themes in American Religious History 

An examination of the theological, ethical, and 
ecclesiastical issues that have characterized 
American religious life from the colonial period 
to the present. 
Zikmund TT 10:30-12 Winter 

LSTC HT 313A 
American Church History 

The pluralistic development of religious ideas, 
movements and institutions in North America 
from colonial times up to the present. The 
course surveys the total religious milieu rather 
than concentrating on Lutheranism. 
Scherer MWF 12-12:50 Fall 

LSTC HT 313B 

American Lutheran Church History 

A core course (alternative to HT 313A) focus- 
ing on Lutheranism in America, especially on 
its problem of unity and polarization. The 
historical development is viewed against the 



51 



broad background of Christianity in America. 
Aim of the course is to gain perspective on our 
present problems in the context of their emer- 
gence and development. 
Fischer MWF 12-12:50 Fall 

NBTS CHT 503 [300 level] 
Baptist History 

An inquiry into important issues and develop- 
ments in Baptist history (particularly in Ameri- 
ca), as an introduction to the origin of Baptist 
groups and to the factors which have shaped 
their development. The methodological ap- 
proach to this subject will consist of a combina- 
tion of lectures and group discussions. 
Ohlmann WF8-9:15 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 424 

Religion in America : The General Experience 

Readings and discussion of selected themes in 
the history of American religion. Initial reading 
of M. Marty, Righteous Empire, required. Spe- 
cific topics then tailored to interests mutually 
agreeable to students and instructor. Specific 
weekly readings, followed by 1-hour weekly 
meeting, individually or in a group. Brief reflec- 
tive paper on a topic suggested by instructor. 
Time of meetings by arrangement. 
Hennesey TBAr Fall 

DEAN Hst 413 

History of the American Church 

A study of the background of present-day 
American Catholicism; the national groups that 
make it up, the problems which it has had to 
face and its response to those problems. 
Hartenbach MW 10-10:50 Fall 

LSTC HT 432 

American Lutheran Polity 

A seminar to examine the governmental princi- 
ples by which the various Lutheran bodies in 
America operate, in the context of their histori- 
cal development. The class will study key 
polity documents, and try to "read between the 
lines." Term paper. Prerequisite: Some previous 
study in American church history. 
Fischer MW2-3:15 Spring 

MTS H 406 (4) 

The American Presbyterian and Reformed 

Churches 

A historical survey of the major Presbyterian 
and Reformed bodies in America, with special 
attention to the theological and institutional 
history of the United Presbyterian Church. 
Schafer WF 2-3:50 Fall 



MTS H 436 (4) 
Theology of Jonathan Edwards 

Edwards' philosophical theology is studied 
against the background of Puritan Calvinism in 
the Age of Reason. 
Schafer M 2-4: 50 Winter 



III. THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



A. METHODS AND DOCTRINES 

BTS B-357 

Current Theological Emphases 

An introduction to theological language and 
ways of thinking will be attempted through an 
interaction between current trends and issues, 
problems of faith, and personal formulations. 
Brown MTh 3:10-4:25 Fall 

CTS TEC 304 
Constructive Theology I 

The nature of theological thinking and theologi- 
cal method. 
Jennings MW 1 : 30-3 Winter 

CTS TEC 305 
Constructive Theology II 

The systematic formulation of the student's 
own theological position is the major task. 
Jennings TT 10: 30-12 Fall 

CTU HDS 320 
Phenomenology of Religion 

The course will first attempt to isolate some of 
the elements common to all religions, and their 
relationship to social structures. From this per- 
spective, the phenomenon of civil religion 
will be examined, especially as it is manifested 
in recent and contemporary attitudes in Ameri- 
can politics and diplomacy. 
Schreiter MWF 12-12: 50 Fall 

CTU HDS 325 
Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and 
methods of theology worked out from a study 
of several case-histories. Special emphasis on 
the historical revelation in Christianity and 
the developing awareness of the faith-com- 
munity in relation to shifting horizons. 
Hayes MWF 10-10:50 Fall 



52 



DEAN Thl 300 
Orientation Course 

The general purpose of the course is to help the 
student make the transition from the philo- 
sophical and empirical methods of his previous 
studies to a strictly theological methodology. 
To this end, the course will concern itself with 
the nature and significance of divine revela- 
tion, faith, dogma, theology, theological lan- 
guage, as well as with the basic presupposi- 
tions of the science of theology. Special em- 
phasis is given to the basic validity and limita- 
tions of theological understanding and expres- 
sion. Classes consist primarily in lectures by 
professor. 
Persich WF 10-10:50 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 351 (5) 
Fundamental Theology I 

I Lectures and tutorials toward a personal syn- 
I thesis of Fundamental Theology. 

Topic: Experience, Faith and Revelation 

Time : four weeks 

Professor: Haight/Schineller 

Topic: Unredeemed World 

Time : two weeks 

Professor: Sears 

Topic : Christian Conversion and Grace 

Time : five weeks 

Professor: Sears 
Admission of other than JSTC M.Div. students 
by approval of instructors. 
Fehr/Haight/Sears/ M 10-10:50, Fall 

Schineller W, 9 : 30-10 : 50, F TBAr 

JSTC DIVN 352 (5) 
Fundamental Theology II 

A continuation of lectures and tutorials toward 
the personal synthesis of Fundamental The- 
ology. 

Topic: Person and Work of Christ 

Time : five weeks 

Professor: Schineller 

Topic : The New People of God 

Time : five weeks 

Professor: Haight 

Topic: The Sacramental Life of the Church 

Time : one week 

Professor: Fehr 
Admission of other than JSTC M.Div. students 
by approval of instructors. 
Fehr/Haight/Sears/ M 10-10:50, Winter 

Schineller W 9 : 30-10 : 50, F TBAr 



JSTC DIVN 353 (5) 
Fundamental Theology III 

A continuation of lectures and tutorials toward 
the personal synthesis of Fundamental The- 
ology. 

Topic: The Sacramental Life of the Church 
(cont'd) 

Time: three weeks 

Professor: Fehr 

Topic: God: One and Triune (toward a 
synthesis of Fundamental) 

Time : four weeks 

Professor: Sears 

Topic: Work on Syntheses 

Time: two weeks 

Professor : individually chosen 

Final Exam Week 
Admission of other than JSTC M.Div. students 
by approval of instructors. 
Fehr/Haight/Sears/ M 10-10:50, Spring 

Schineller W 9 : 30-10 : 50, F TB Ar 

LSTC CT 320 
Introduction to Theology 

The aim of this course is threefold: 1) to define 
the nature of theology and the relations be- 
tween the various disciplines of the curriculum, 
2) to familiarize students with the chief prob- 
lems and issues in the current theological situa- 
tion, 3) and to discuss various options in doing 
theology today. 
Braaten MWF 11-11:50 Fall 

LSTC CT 322,323 
Christian Theology I, II 

Survey and interpretation of basic Christian 
doctrine. The full range of Christian doctrine, 
from creation to eschatology, is dealt with in 
these two courses. Although each course forms 
an independent unit, the two courses are inter- 
related to constitute a total sequence. Students 
interested in taking only one of the courses 
should consult with the instructor. 
Hefner MW2-3:15 Fall/Winter 



MTS T 301 

Introduction to Theology I: Fundamental 

Theology 

An introduction to the study of theology as the 
reasoned endeavor to understand the reality of 
human life in the world from the perspective of 
Christian faith in God. Fundamental Theology 



53 



deals with issues of revelation, faith in God, 
religious experience and symbolism. Recom- 
mended for all first year students. 
Parker TT 11-12:50 Fall 

MTS T 302 

Introduction to Theology II: Basic Christian 

Doctrines 

This course is designed to introduce the basic 
doctrines of the Christian faith, as these are 
understood and reflected upon by representa- 
tive theologians. Attention will be given to 
coherent and constructive appropriation of the 
Christian tradition. Recommended for all first 
year students. 
Burkhart WF 11-12:50 Winter 

NETS CHT 571 1300 level) 

Systematic Theology I: Introduction to Theol- 
ogy 

This course provides an introduction to the 
study of the presuppositions of theology. The 
relation of faith and reason is taken up in detail. 
The term concludes with a study of revelation 
and inspiration. The works of various theo- 
logians are studied. Term paper or three re- 
ports. Midterm and final examinations. 
Young TT8-9:15 Fall 

NETS CHT 572 [300 level] 

Systematic Theology II : God and Creation 

The term begins with a study of the nature of 
God in scripture and Christian history. God's 
work or the doctrine of creation is taken up. 
The term concludes with the creation and fall 
of man. The works of various theologians are 
used. Term paper or three reports. Midterm 
and final examinations. 
Young TT8-9:15 Winter 

NETS CHT 573 (300 level) 

Systematic Theology III: Christ and Redemp- 
tion 

The term begins with a study of the person 
and work of Christ, both historically and to- 
day. In the latter part of the term, the place of 
the Holy Spirit in the making of the new life, 
the church, and the consummation are taken 
up. The works of various theologians are used. 
Final examination. Report for class presenta- 
tion and discussion. 
Young TT8-9:15 Spring 

NETS CHT 551 (300 level) 
Philosophy of Religion 

This course is an introduction to the main 
religious philosophies in western culture. The 



origin of Christian doctrines and the historical 
background and development of modern sys- 
tems are studied and evaluated. Lecture and dis- 
cussion. Three reading reports or term paper 
required. Midterm and final examination. 
Young MWF 10:30-11:20 Spring 

CTU HDS 330 

The Problem of God and Contemporary 

Society 

An analysis of why God has become proble- 
matic for contemporary man is followed by a 
critical review of representative Christian at- 
tempts to respond to this problem. The course 
seeks to help the student evaluate his own reli- 
gious experience and respond intelligently to 
modern man's problem of God. 
Hayes MWF 10-10:50 Winter 

CTU HDS 345 
Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church; the rela- 
tion of the Kingdom to the Church; the basic 
images and themes in Scripture and tradition; 
the development of ecclesiastical office; and the 
relation of the Church to the world. 
Ahner MWF 11-11: 50 Spring 

CTS TEC 404 

Studies in Theological Method 

The uses of reason, experience, imagination, 

and memory. 

LeFevre TT 9-10:30 Winter 

CTS TEC 406 
Christology 

Who is Jesus for us today, really? An investi- 
gation of the relationship of Jesus to contempo- 
rary faith, especially in the light of the "quests" 
for Jesus and the question of the "kerygmatic" 
Christ. Attention is also given to non-theologi- 
cal modes of representing the significance of 
Jesus in contemporary literature and music. 
Jennings TT 1-2 : 30 Spring 

CTU HDS 440 
Christology 

A critical review of Scriptural and traditional 
interpretations of Incarnation and Salvation in 
an effort to arrive at an articulation of what 
Jesus Christ and redemption mean for con- 
temporary man. 

Hayes MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

Schreiter MWF 9-9:50 Winter 



54 



DEAN Thl 422 
Christology/Soteriology 

A study of God's revelation of his love for man 
in the Incarnation, Passion, and Resurrection 
of Jesus. A study of historical development 
which led to the dogmatic pronouncements of 
Chalcedon. An analysis of traditional and con- 
temporary theories of Redemption. A survey of 
contemporary Christological problems. Lec- 
tures by professor; discussion seminars led by 
individual students. 
Persich MWF 8-8:50 Fall 

DEAN Thl 423 

Man In Christ - Mary 

A semi-personalist approach to an understand- 
ing of the Christian life with an emphasis upon 
Christ as the Sacrament of Encounter between 
God and man. At the same time, attention is 
given to philosophical analysis of the physical 
transformation wrought by created grace to dis- 
pose man for the reception of uncreated grace. 
The Virgin Mary is studied as the masterpiece 
of divine grace: in her each of us can see to 
what God calls him. 
Persich MWF 8-8:50 Spring 

CTS TEC 411 
Theological Anthropology 

An examination of the major doctrines of Chris- 
tian anthropology including: Imago Dei, the 
Fall, original and actual sin, and sanctification. 
We will focus on such questions as: To what 
extent do these doctrines illumine our life and 
that of our contemporaries? What implications 
do they have for the ministry of pastoral care 
and social transformation? 
Jennings TT 10 : 30-12 Winter 

CTU HDS 446 

The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

For course description consult World Mission 

Studies offerings. 

Ahner TT 10:30-11:45 Fall 

DEAN Thl 403 
Ecclesiology 

Based upon the "Lumen Gentium," the course 
seeks to understand the Church as the People 
of God and as the Mystical Body of Christ. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the universal 
Christian priesthood, the basic equality and 
functional inequality of Church members, the 
universal responsibility of all Christians for the 
Church's achievement of itself and of its mission 
to the world. 
Persich MWF 9-9:50 Spring 



MTS T 406 

The Doctrine of the Spirit 

A consideration of the doctrine of the Holy 
Spirit in the Christian theological tradition. 
Attention will be given to some current mani- 
festations of the Spirit in the life and work of 
the churches. 
Parker MW 11-12:50 Spring 

CTU HDS 453 

Myths, Signs, Symbols, Sacraments 

The course is intended to provide the student 
with a foundation for the doctrinal study of 
the sacraments. Cross-cultural and interdisci- 
plinary in perspective, it will examine various 
sacramental motifs both phenomenologically 
and comparatively. 
Heisig MW2-3:15 Spring 

CTU HDS 455 
Sacraments of Initiation 

General introduction to sacramental theology. 
Historical development of the rites and theology 
of Christian initiation. Current questions con- 
cerning the theology, catechesis, and celebra- 
tion of the sacraments of initiation. 
Dorff MWF 12-12:50 Fall 

DEAN Thl 461 
Sacramental I 

Theology of the Sacraments in General, of 
Baptism, Confirmation, and Orders. The his- 
tory, dogma, liturgy, and moral implications 
of the three sacraments are treated after a gen- 
eral introduction to the sacramental system. 
Falanga MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

CTU HDS 450 
Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the scriptural origins and historical 
development of the eucharistic liturgy, with 
particular emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. 
Theological reflection on the meaning of 
eucharist in light of the above and of contem- 
porary discussion. Consideration of current 
questions, e.g., ecumenical questions of inter- 
communion and eucharistic ministry. 
Ostdiek MWF 10-10:50 Fall 

Dorff MWF 11-11:50 Winter 

DEAN Thl 462 
Sacramental II : Eucharist 

Sacramental Theology of the Eucharist, includ- 
ing the scriptural, liturgical, patristic, dogmatic, 
moral, pastoral, and canonical points of view. 
It does not include rubrics or practice. It aims 
to give the students a competent knowledge. 



55 



to acquaint them with bibliography, and to 

stimulate further research. 

Rousseau MWF 10-10:50 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 467 
Theology of the Eucharist 

An interpretation of the symbolic action of the 
Eucharist, in order to show its rich significance 
for the community's relationship to God in 
Christ. The meaning of the Eucharist will be 
sought from the New Testament. The historical 
development will be surveyed, with some atten- 
tion to theories of the real presence and the 
question of the Mass as sacrifice. Special em- 
phasis will be placed on the "ecclesial" dimen- 
sion of the Eucharist, as re-discovered in the 
liturgical renewal of the past decade. Lectures, 
brief student reports, class discussions on as- 
signed readings. Paper required. 
Fehr TT 10:30-11 : 45 Winter 

MTS T 402 

Baptism and Eucharist 

A study of the Christian doctrines of baptism 
and eucharist with emphasis upon critical anal- 
ysis of various issues now in controversy. 
Attention will be given to the liturgical impli- 
cations of various theological outlooks. 
Burkhart W 2-4: 50 Fall 

CTU HDS 460 

Sacraments of Penance, Anointing, Orders 

The origins and historical development of pen- 
ance, anointing, ordination. Questions of con- 
temporary theological significance and celebra- 
tion of these sacraments. 
Ostdiek MWF 10-10:50 Spring 

DEAN Thl 463 

Sacramental III: Penance and the Anointing of 

the Sick 

The history, dogma, liturgy, and moral impli- 
cations of these two sacraments are studied. 
Principles and their applications for the minis- 
ter of the sacraments are part of the course. 
Falanga MWF 9-9: 50 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 464 
Reconciliation and Penance 

A team-taught course exploring the meaning of 
and sacramental means of reconciliation. Re- 
conciliation will be examined in its individual 
and social spheres, as a central theme of Chris- 
tian existence, and in the styles and forms of 
sacramental reconciliation focusing on the sac- 
rament of penance. Method will be a critical 



evaluation of key texts, lectures and discus- 
sion. Requirements to be agreed upon at the be- 
ginning of the course. 
Fehr/Schineller MW 3: 30-4: 45 Fall 

DEAN Thl 464 
Sacramental IV : Matrimony 

The course covers the whole sacramental theol- 
ogy of marriage, with the exception of the 
moral theology on the use of marriage. Its 
praenotamina are: marriage as natural institu- 
tion, teaching of the Scriptures, of the Fathers, 
of the Magisterium. The main body of the 
course consists in an explanation of the canons 
of the Code and of the later ecclesiastical docu- 
ments. Matrimonial procedures in cases of nul- 
lity and dissolution of the bond conclude the 
course. 
Danagher MWF 8-8:50 Fall 

CTU HDS 435 

Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning the 

origins of man, the world and evil; a correlative 

investigation of finality and eschatological 

symbolism. 

Hayes MWF 10-10:50 Spring 

CTS TEC 408 
Eschatology 

For what may we still hope? A study of the 
relationship of faith to the future growing out 
of the rediscovery of apocalyptic in biblical 
faith. The relationship of apocalyptic to move- 
ments of liberation from the Middle Ages to 
the present and the response of contemporary 
theologians to the crisis of hope will be dis- 
cussed. 
Jennings WF 1 : 30-3 Spring 

CTU HDS 436 

Eschatology and Eschatologies 

For course description consult World Mission 

Studies offerings. 

Schreiter MWF 11-11:50 Winter 

CTS TEC 500 
Interpretation 

A seminar examining diverse modes of theologi- 
cal interpretation aiming at developing skills 
in relating theological perspectives to the con- 
crete human situation. Open only to CTS stu- 
dents. 
Jennings F 2-5 Fall 

CTU HDS 505 

Constructing Local Theologies 

For course description consult World Mission 



56 



Studies offerings. 

Schreiter M 7-9 : 30 pm 



Spring 



BTS B-550 

The Language of Christology 

Following an examination of the doctrine of 
revelation and questions of theological epis- 
temology, the course deals with matters per- 
taining to the person and work of Christ. A 
constructive analysis and statement of the lan- 
guage of Christology is presented. The student 
is afforded the opportunity to formulate a 
doctrinal position and to test the statement 
against the Bible and church tradition, in dialog 
with other class participants. 
Groff WF 8-9:20 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 552 
Contemporary Christologies 

The characteristics of contemporary Christolo- 
gies contrasted with older approaches. Close 
reading, analysis, discussion and critique of the 
writings of K. Rahner, Schoonenberg, Pannen- 
berg, and others in this field. Introductory 
Christology and Soteriology required. At least 
three must register for the course for credit; 
guided reading, discussion and some lecture. 
Paper required. 
Doyle Th 3 : 30-5 : 30 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 553 

Theology of the Holy Spirit 

A study of the thought of the German Catholic 
theologian Heribert Muhlen on the centrality of 
the Holy Spirit for a personalized world view 
for today. Texts will be a dissertation on Muh- 
len and further reading in some area of choice. 
Implications for church renewal and interper- 
sonal philosophy of the world will be pursued. 
Lecture, discussion, and a final paper. Prere- 
quisite: at least one year of theology. Very use- 
ful, but not essential: a reading knowledge of 
German. 
Sears TT 9-10: 15 Fall 

MTS T 532 (4) 

Advanced Problems in Systematic Theology 

Offers an opportunity for intensive study of a 
specific contemporary theological topic, 
thinker, movement, or problem. To be nego- 
tiated. 
Burkhart M 2-4:50 Spring 

CTS TEC 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 



areas of Theological Studies. 

Staff TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 

B. THINKERS AND SCHOOLS 
OF THOUGHT 

MTS T 419 (4) 

The Theology of Schleiermacher 

A seminar on the major theological writings of 
Friedrich Schleiermacher, with a focus on the 
issues of theological method and constructive 
reinterpretation of Christian doctrines in his 
work. Includes an assessment of his contribu- 
tions to liberal theology. 
Parker M 2-4:50 Fall 

BTS B-452 

Theology of Karl Barth 

An inductive study of representative writings. 
Principal readings will be in Church Dogmatics. 
Groff Th 1 : 10-3 : 30 Winter 

BTS B-467 

Seminar : Theology of Bonhoeffer 

The seminar will focus on the life and writings 
of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Special attention will 
be given to his theology of discipleship, his leg- 
acy to secular theology, and the much-discussed 
themes from his prison letters such as religion- 
less Christianity, world come of age, man for 
others, the God beyond in the midst of life, 
and others. 
Brown WF 8-9:20 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 455 

Rahner's Theological Anthropology 

A. course based on Rahner's book, Hearers of 
the Word, and associated articles such as "Sci- 
ence as a Confession," "History of the World 
and Salvation-History," "Concerning the Rela- 
tionship between Nature and Grace," and 
similar articles. Time for discussion during the 
lectures as difficulties arise. No paper required. 
Oral examination of one half hour at end of 
course. 
Wulftange M 3:30-5:30 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 459 

Christian Life According to Rahner 

This course will be based on such articles as 
"The Apostolate of Prayer," "A Spiritual Dia- 
logue at Evening: on Sleep, Prayer, and Other 
Subjects," "Poetry and the Christian," "Theo- 
logical Remarks on the Problem of Leisure," 
"The Theology of Power," and so on. Time for 
discussion during the lectures as difficulties 
arise. No paper required. Oral examination of 



57 



one half hour at end of course. 
Wulftange M 3:30-5:30 



Winter 



JSTC DIVN 456 

Lonergan's Method in Theology 

This course will be based on Lonergan's Method 
in Theology. Lectures on a selection of the chap- 
ters. Time for discussion during the lectures as 
difficulties arise. No paper required. Oral exam- 
ination of one half hour at end of course. 
Wulftange M 3 : 30-5 : 30 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 457 

Lonergan and Rahner: A Comparison and 

Critique 

The professor will attempt a comparison and 
critique of Rahner's philosophy and theology 
with those of Lonergan. In so doing he will 
try to complement the work of both of these 
scholars in areas needing further development. 
Time for discussion during the lectures as dif- 
ficulties arise. No paper required. Oral examina- 
tion of one half hour at end of course. 
Wulftange W 3:30-5:30 Fall 

CTS TEC 472c 

The Psychology of Maslow and its Religious 

Significance 

An experiential and conceptual inquiry into 

Maslow's religious meaning. 

Foster TT 1-2:30 Fall 

MTS T 414 (4) 

Studies in Reformed Theology 

A theological exploration of the distinctive 
character and components of Reformed theol- 
ogy. Emphasis upon an understanding of what 
"thinking within a tradition" is. Includes study 
of selected writings, including major figures 
and confessional documents. Special attention 
to the Confession of 1967, to determine whether 
and in what ways it is a reformed document. 
Burkhart TT 11-12:50 Spring 

NBTS CHT 553 (400 levelj 

The British Evangelical Theological Tradition 

A study of P. T. Forsyth and James Denny. An 
examination of two evangelical theologians 
within the context of their times, relating to 
the challenge to theology amidst sweeping 
change. The identification of evangelical com- 
ponents will be attempted. Course metho- 
dology will comprise a general dialogue over 
significant theological themes and student pro- 
jects of independent study and report. The rele- 
vance for contemporary preaching will be 



stressed. Other requirements to be determined. 
Nelson Th 7-9:30 pm Winter 

NBTS CHT 583 (400 level) 
Recent Theological Thought 

The trends of the nineteenth century, stressing 
idealism, humanism, and exitentialism will be 
surveyed as background to the twentieth cen- 
tury. The course will concentrate on such theo- 
logians as Barth, Brunner, Bultmann, Bon- 
hoeffer, the Niebuhrs, Fen:e, and Tillich. Con- 
ducted as a seminar. Term paper required for 
class preparation and discussion. 
Young TT 1 : 10-2 : 25 Winter 

CTS TEC 410 
Religious Existentialism 

A study and evaluation of the thought of cer- 
tain major existentialist writers. The work of 
such authors as Kierkegaard, Berdyaev, Marcel, 
Buber, and Bultmarm is considered. 
LeFevre TTIO: 30-12 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 473 

American Pragmatism and Theology 

A team-taught course, exploring the insights 
and viewpoints of American pragmatism, ex- 
em.plified especially in William James and John 
Dewey. Focus will be on evaluating their view 
of experience and its significance for systematic 
theology. French Modernism, especially 
Edouard LeRoy, will be studied as a concrete 
application of the method of pragmatism to 
theology. Requirements will be short weekly 
papers or a more extensive report. 
Haight/Schineller MW 3: 30-4: 45 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 488 
Process Theology 

Initial lectures, selected readings, and discus- 
sions on the process thought of Whitehead will 
move into a study of contemporary process 
theologies of God, Christ, and the church. 
Paper required. Final written or oral examina- 
tion. 
Montague Th 3:30-5:30 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 466 

The Liberationist Interpretation of Christianity 

This course will consist in reading and discus- 
sing texts of Gustavo Gutierrez and Juan Luis 
Segundo and in a critical analysis and evalua- 
tion of the fundamental themes and positions 
that make up their liberationist interpretation of 
Christianity with a special concern for the ques- 
tion of whether and to what extent it can be 



58 



considered universally normative. A fifteen 
page paper on one basic theme from the The- 
ology of Liberation required of each student. 
Grades will be determined on the basis of the 
paper and active participation in the discussion. 
Haight MWF2-2:50 Fall 

LSTC CT 425 

The Latin American Theology of Liberation 

The purpose of this course will be to read the 
main documents and texts coming out of Latin 
America which arise out of the framework 
of the theology of liberation. A special focus of 
the course will be to understand the connec- 
tions between the gospel of salvation and the 
struggles for liberation in economic, social 
and political terms. Both Protestant and Roman 
Catholic contributions will be studied. 
Braaten MW2-3:15 Spring 

LSTC CT 515 

Seminar in 19th Century Theology: Studies in 

Hegel 

Limited enrollment, admission only by approval 

of instructor. 

Hefner Th 2-4:30 Spring 

CTS TEC 532a 
Whitehead 

An examination of Whitehead's philosophical 
theology and a consideration of its implications 
for social ethics and for research in the social 
sciences. The primary reading will be Process 
and Reality. Students electing this course and 
not TEC 532b may elect either a term paper or 
a final examination to fulfill requirements for 
this course. Students electing TEC 532b receive 
credit for both TEC 532a and TEC 532b upon 
completion of TEC 532b. 
Schroeder TTl-2:30 Fall 

CTS TEC 532b 
Whitehead 

Prerequisite: TEC 532a. A seminar for the de- 
velopment and oral defense of papers dealing 
with some aspect of Whitehead's thought. The 
first month of the term will be devoted to a 
consideration of selected writings of White- 
head. After a reading period during which stu- 
dents develop their papers, the final portion of 
the term will be devoted to an oral defense of 
the students' papers before members of the 
seminar. 
Schroeder TTl-2:30 Winter 

CTS TEC 533 

Contemporary Process Theology 

This seminar will focus on the writings of 



people informed by the philosophical theology 
of A. N. Whitehead. The writings will be select- 
ed from the work of such representative figures 
as William Beardslee, John Cobb, David Grif- 
fin, Charles Hartshorne, Bernard Lee, Bernard 
Meland, Schubert Ogden, Norman Pittenger, 
and Daniel D. Williams. Although it is not a 
formal pre-requisite, students interested in this 
seminar who have not studied Whitehead in 
depth are encouraged to take TEC 532a and 
532b. These courses will be offered in the Au- 
tumn, 1975, and Winter, 1976, quarters. 
Schroeder M 1:30-4:30 Spring 

CTU HDS 520 
Theology of Karl Rahner 

A study of the philosophical orientation of 

Rahner and its implications in his theological 

writings. 

Hayes Th2-4:30 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 584 

C. G. Jung and Theology 

A study of the theological implications of Jun- 
gian therapy and thought focused toward inter- 
relating psychotherapy and theology. Basic 
readings in Jung (more advanced for those ac- 
quainted with him), lecture and discussion on 
theological evaluation of him: myth and sym- 
bol, individuation process, trinity and femin- 
inity within. Accountability will be an oral 
exam on Jung and a paper evaluating theologi- 
cally some aspect of his thought. 
Sears TT 10:30-11:45 Spring 

MTS T 532 (4) 

Advanced Problems in Systematic Theology 

Offers an opportunity for intensive study of a 
specific contemporary theological topic, think- 
er, movement, or problem. To be negotiated. 
Burkhart M 2-4: 50 Spring 

CTS TEC 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 

areas of Theological Studies. 

Staff TBAr Fall /Winter/ Spring 



C. ISSUES AND TOPICS 

CTS TEC 301 
Christian Existence 

Turning personally lived moments into mean- 



59 



ings and communal culture, existing one's self 
in the developmental tasks throughout the span 
of life, growing a developmental-existential- 
phenomenological-societal style that expresses 
Christian existence. Cohering highlights from 
Bonhoeffer, Buber, Marcel, Kierkegaard, 
Heidegger, Mead. Special projects in phenom- 
enological photography and producing cas- 
settes of Significant Other. Our identity as 
ministry of meanings and shapers of symbols. 
A period of intense living for a month. Open 
only to CTS students. 
R. Snyder TBAr Sept. 22-Oct. 17 

BTS B-459 

Theology and Literary Arts 

A study of various images of heroism in the 

American imagination through selected novels 

and plays. Particular attention will be given to 

the interplay between such themes as forest 

and settlement, individual and community, 

innocence and maturation, and the fate of the 

lonely "hero" in relation to the "alien tribe." 

Groff M 3:30-6 Spring 

CCTS 472 

Communicating the Gospel in a Scientific Age 

In this course the following goals will guide the 
study: (1) to introduce students to theologies 
and theologians which seek explicitly to ad- 
dress the contemporary scientific and techno- 
logical worldview; (2) to acquaint students 
with basic work in philosophy of science and 
theological methodology which are relevant to 
such theological address; and (3) to assist stu- 
dents who are already familiar with matters 
represented by goals (1) and (2) further to ad- 
vance their understandings in these and/ or re- 
lated areas. In approaching such goals two 
methods will be emphasized: (1) individual 
tutorial sessions which will help the student to 
advance at his/her own pace, to deal with new 
perspectives, and to prepare a research paper; 
and (2) seminar sessions which will deal with 
readings corresponding to the first two goals 
mentioned above. Readings in theology may 
include issues such as those raised in Peacock's 
Science and the Christian Experiment, Teil- 
hard de Chardin's Phenomenon of Man, Cobb's 
A Christian Natural Theology, as well as those 
treated in selected works of the convenors. 
Readings in the methodolog>'^ and philosophy of 
science may include issues such as those dealt 
with in Gilkey's ReUgion and the Scientific 
Future, Barbour's Issues in Science and Religion, 



Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolution, 
Margenau's Open Vistas. Prerequisite: at least 
two courses in systematic or philosophical 
theology, and approval of the convenors. 
Scientific background helpful but not necessary. 
Initial session at LSTC. 
Hefner/Burhoe Th 2-5 Winter 

CCTS 495 

Religious Experience, Spirituality and Spiritual 

Growth 

For course description consult Pastoral Care 
and Spiritual Direction offerings. 
Buzzard/Isabell TBAn Winter 

CTS TEC 412 
Communication 

An examination of the process of communica- 
tion based particularly on Buber, Jaspers, Mar- 
cel, and contemporary communication theory. 
R.Snyder TT 8: 30-10 Spring 

CTS TEC 425 

Love and Justice in Christian Thought 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Meyners MF 10:30-12 Fall 

CTS TEC 445 (IVz) 

Seminar in Contemporary Black Authors in 

Religion 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Rooks M 3 : 30-5 Winter 

CTS TEC 413 

CTU HDS 413 

Correlating Christian Theology and Social 

Sciences 

A careful examination and evaluation of the 
possible mutual interaction between the social 
sciences and Christian theology, using illustra- 
tions from indigenous developments among 
Afro-Americans and depicting through such an 
analysis how the social disciplines can make a 
contribution to the principles of Christian 
theology. Special attention given to equipping 
persons with principles of methodological 
rationality for the correlation process. Read- 
ings, discussions, lectures, projects. Class ses- 
sions held at CTS. 
Pero M 9-12 Winter 

CTS TEC 466 

Psychosynthesis : Dreams, Fantasy, and Reli- 
gion 

An exploration of a powerful new method of 



60 



psychotherapy and education that utiHzes 
symboHc visualization, art, meditation, music, 
dreams, fantasy, movement, and a method 
that is particularly congenial to theological 
and religious perspectives. 
Foster F 2-5 Fall 

CTU HDS 446 

The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

For course description consult World Mission 

Studies offerings. 

Ahner TT 10:30-11:45 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 450 

The Theology of Conversion 

This course will be based on Newman's Gram- 
mar of Assent, on selected letters of Newman, 
on various articles by Karl Rahner, on Loner- 
gan's treatment of the subject and on some of 
Lonergan's critics. Time for discussion during 
the lectures as difficulties arise. No paper re- 
quired. Oral examination of one half hour at 
end of course. 
Wulf tange W 3 : 30-5 : 30 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 462 

Development of Christian Doctrine 

This course will be based on The Development 
of Christian Doctrine by Newman, Develop- 
ment of Christian Doctrine by Jaroslav Pelikan, 
various articles by Karl Rahner, and Lonergan's 
treatment of the subject. Time for discussion 
during the lectures as difficulties arise. No paper 
required. Oral examination of one half hour at 
end of course. 
Wulf tange W 3 : 30-5 : 30 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 468 

Christianity : A Western or Universal Religion? 

A tentative approach to Christianity from a 
viewpoint other than Western philosophy to 
answer the question: is Christianity a decadent 
Western religion or a dynamic universal reli- 
gion? Format and requirements to be deter- 
mined. 
Hebga TBAn Winter 

LSTC CT 410 

"The Essence of Christianity" from Schleier- 

macher to Tillich 

This course will deal with the "essence of Chris- 
tianity" as a genre of theological research which 
flourished in the nineteenth century and is now 
taken up in twentieth century theology as the 
quest for the identity principle of Christianity. 
The positions of leading theologians will be 



studied, including Schleiermacher, Feuerbach, 
Ritschl, Troeltsch, Barth, Bultmann and Til- 
lich. The aim of the course will be to answer 
the question: what makes Christian theology 
Christian? 
Braaten Th 2-4:30 Fall 

LSTC CT 421 
Eschatology and History 

This course will deal with the theme of eschatol- 
ogy in contemporary biblical and systematic 
theology. The focal problem of the seminar 
will be the various ways in which eschatology 
is related to history. The contributions of theo- 
logians such as J. Weiss, Bultmann, Cullmann, 
Barth, Tillich, Moltmann and Pannenberg will 
be analyzed and compared with each other. 
Braaten Th2-4:30 Winter 

LSTC CT 442 

Theology and the Church's Ministry 

Limited enrollment, admission only by approval 

of instructor. 

Hefner TT 12-1 : 15 Fall 

MTS T 416 (4) 

Social Theory and Theological Method 

A scrutiny of various ways for getting at social 
reality, in order to evaluate the implications of 
these for responsible believing, deciding, acting. 
Attention will be given to the social theories 
of phenomenology, pragmatism, and struc- 
turalism. 
Burkhart TT 11-12:50 Fall 

MTS T 432 (4) 

Women's Issues : Theology 

The course will deal with both Liberation The- 
ology (i.e., Letty Russell, Mary Daly) and Sys- 
tematic Theology (e.g., Calvin, Tillich). This 
course will look at why these theologies came 
into being. Second, it will look at the question 
of symbols within both theological processes 
and attempt to integrate them. 
Adj M 9-12: 15 Winter 

(includes 1-hour break for Chapel) 

MTS T 428 (4) 
Love in Human Life 

An examination of some important interpreta- 
tions of love in classical and contemporary wis- 
dom. Particular stress will be given to the 
contributions of Christian wisdom to our under- 
standing the life of love. 
Parker W 2-4:50 Winter 



61 



CTS TEC 503 
Love 

A seminar considering psychological, philo- 
sophical, and theological dimensions of the 
problems of love. 
LeFevre WF 10:30-12 Spring 

CCTS 572 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and the Sci- 
ences 

The seminar is designed as a forum for papers 
by theological and scientific faculty and ad- 
vanced students. It seeks to move toward a the- 
ology which is solidly grounded in the best of 
today's scientific understandings and which at 
the same time may be dynamic in eliciting 
religious feelings and behavior characteristic 
of the best Christian tradition whereby persons 
are led to appreciate the reality of God's sover- 
eignty and grace which are manifest in environ- 
ing nature and in human form, and to find 
thereby a new meaning, hope, sense of duty, 
and beatific perspective in God's realm. 
Each weekly session will be the occasion for the 
presentation and critical evaluation of one or 
more papers exploring an interpretation of his- 
toric religious doctrines in the light of the sci- 
ences. Among the historic religious doctrines 
that may be interpreted are such primary Chris- 
tian categories as God, Creation, Human Na- 
ture, Sin, Salvation, Church, Revelation, and 
Mission to the World. No specific topic is ex- 
cluded per se, no matter how out of theological 
favor it may presently be or how seemingly 
incongruous with recent secular doctrine. For 
the seminar, the light of the sciences will be 
sought primarily through focus upon the so- 
called "hard" sciences that have provided a new 
world view or "metaphysics." These sciences 
include physics, biology, sociobiology, and psy- 
chobiology. However, this primary focus does 
not exclude perspectives from the psychosocial 
sciences, which will also be heavily involved. 
At the core of its activity the seminar will ex- 
plore and test a basic hypothesis: that recent 
scientific information suggests that evolving 
psychobiological and sociobiological systems 
require religions as value cores, that the tradi- 
tional religion of each culturetype has been 
selected for the same kinds of life-producing 
wisdom as have been selected in the genotypes 
for all animal organisms and societies, and 
that all of this is generated and selected by a 
creative system of dynamic reality far tran- 
scending any of its creatures. 



Admission for credit: While the seminar is ex- 
pected primarily to involve the presentation of 
papers by faculty and advanced students, ad- 
mission for credit is also open to other stu- 
dents whose proposals for a paper to be pre- 
sented and whose background in theology and 
science is deemed satisfactory by the convenors. 
High performance in CCTS 472 may be deemed 
sufficient for admission, and capacity to dis- 
cuss critically and to advance themes such as 
those published in Zygon, Journal of Religion 
and Science would provide excellent grounding 
for any participants in the seminar. 
Admission without credit: Participation is also 
open to Cluster students and faculty who have 
a concern to become more informed about and/ 
or to participate in this research and develop- 
ment program without obligating themselves 
to meet the specific course requirements. Such 
persons should inform one of the convenors 
in advance of their intention to participate 
in this manner. 

Requirements for students taking the seminar 
for credit will be (1) to present an original paper 
of some 20-30 doublespaced pages (during one 
of the last five weeks of the quarter) on a topic 
approved by the convenors and to defend it 
successfully during its discussion, and (2) to 
present a one- or two-page critical and construc- 
tive analysis of the proceedings of each of the 
other papers and discussions in the seminar 
sessions. Initial session at home of Dr. Burhoe, 
1525 E. 59th St., Chicago. 
Burhoe/Hefner Th 7-10 pm Spring 

NETS CHT 508 
Christianity and Culture 

In an effort to assist each student in formulating 
an informed and appropriate Christian stance 
toward culture (human ideologies, social struc- 
tures, values, and technology), we will ex- 
amine the major options open to us, defining 
each position, illustrating them by reference 
to significant theologians and movements, de- 
lineating their theological bases, and evaluating 
their strengths and weaknesses. To culminate 
the course, each student is required to prepare 
a position statement and defend it before the 
class. 
Ohlmann MWF2:10-3 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 524 
Demonology and Witchcraft 

A study of the phenomena historically con- 
sidered demonic and diabolical: possession, 



62 



magic, divination, prophecy, witchcraft, and 
Satanism. The course will move on to review the 
biblical and ecclesial evidence for the existence 
and activity of angels and devils. Requirements 
to be determined. 
Fortman Th 1:30-3:15 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 551 

Theology of Priestly Ministry 

An examination of the nature of the ordained 
ministry in the Church, based on the evidence 
of the New Testament and subsequent histori- 
cal development. The interpretation of the or- 
dained ministry will be related to Christology 
and Ecclesiology, and situated in the context 
of the "priesthood of all believers." Lectures, 
class discussions on assigned readings, term 
paper. Prerequisite: introductory ecclesiol- 
ogy. 
Burns/Fehr TT 9-10: 15 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 555 

The Experience and Language of Grace 

Supposing that the topic "Grace" crystalizes a 
theological anthropology, that is, a basic con- 
ception of the ground of spirituality and how 
the Christian God and people interrelate, this 
course will study the concept of grace in repre- 
sentatives of different epochs of Christian his- 
tory with special stress on how their concep- 
tions ("Languages ') were different because of 
the cultural experiences out of which they 
emerged. After situating the problem, the class 
will read and discuss in a structured way Wil- 
liam James (The Varieties of Religious Experi- 
ence), Augustine (On the Spirit and the Letter), 
Aquinas ("On Grace," Summa Theologiae), 
Luther (The Freedom of the Christian), Trent 
(Decree on Justification) , Rahner ("On Salva- 
tion History," Theological Investigations) . The 
grade will be determined by a 15 page paper on 
one of the authors mentioned (containing some 
comparison with the others) and by active parti- 
cipation in the discussions. 
Haight MWF 2-2:50 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 590 

The Mysteries of Christ's Life For Today 

A consideration of the mysteries of Christ's 
life, death and resurrection based on the latest 
and best exegesis and systematic theology and 
pointed toward pastoral relevance. Prerequi- 
sites: basic Christology and Scripture. Lecture, 
discussion; paper at end. 
Doyle Th 3 : 30-5 : 30 Winter 



MTS T 532 (4) 

Advanced Problems in Systematic Theology 

Offers an opportunity for intensive study of a 
specific contemporary theological topic, think- 
er, movement, or problem. To be negotiated. 
Burkhart M 2-4:50 Spring 

CTS TEC 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 

areas of Theological Studies. 

Staff TBAr Fall /Winter/ Spring 



IV. ETHICAL STUDIES 

A. METHODS AND PRINCIPLES 

CTS TEC 320 

Social Transformation: Church and Commun- 
ity 

An intensive introduction to the concrete study 
of the problem of the contemporary church in 
the midst of the changing social structures of 
urban and rural life. Open only to CTS stu- 
dents. 
Meyners TBAr Fall 

CTS TEC 321 
Christian Ethics 

Historical and contemporary Christian ethical 
systems with a consideration of their implica- 
tions and current significance. 
Schroeder MW 1:30-3 Fall 

CTU HDS 370 

Introduction to Moral Theology 

This course is intended for students who have 
had no systematic approach to moral theology. 
The stress here will be on the basic principles 
guiding human action and attitude, in so far as 
they are compatible with the essentials of Chris- 
tian tradition and suitable for facilitating con- 
science formation and decision-making, in the 
face of modern conflicts and problems. 
Donahey W 6:30-9:30 pm Spring 

DEAN Thl 341 
Principles of Morality 

The course seeks to inquire into the psychologi- 
cal and moral factors involved in the develop- 
ment of human personality in general and of a 
Christian personality in particular. Particular 
stress is placed upon the study of freedom and 
liberty in the healthy sense of the word, upon 



63 



the influences of society upon human behavior, 
upon the actuality of determinism in the human 
personality, etc. The approach is entirely along 
the lines of creativity rather than along the 
lines of conformity. 
Persich MWF 8-8: 50 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 335, 536, 337 
Contemporary Christian Ethics, I, II, III 

Goals of course: to help participants develop 
an understanding of the sources and directions 
of current moral analysis in preparation for 
ministry in the Church of today and tomorrow. 
The program runs for three quarters and must 
be taken in sequence. Content of this program: 
three sections of material, not necessarily coter- 
minous with the three quarters : 

1. Study of the structure of contemporary 
Christian Ethics by reference to its development 
in purpose, content, and method both within 
and outside of the Roman Catholic tradition. 

2. Exploration of a systematic and constructive 
Christian Ethic, both individual and social, 
suitable to meet the needs of today's evolving 
ministry, and dealing with such topics as human 
freedom and grace within the religious context 
of moral decision, the process of formation of 
conscience and of reason-giving, the character- 
istics of virtuous or vicious decision-taking 
and its impact on both person and community. 
(Participants will share readings, lectures, and 
class discussions in dealing with these first two 
sections and will be expected to submit written 
reflections on the material covered at the end 
of each section of material.) 

3. Investigation of moral reasoning concerning 
particular issues of current importance, such as: 
injustice, oppression, inequality, and the use of 
violence; care for human life in its social and 
individual dimensions; the dimensions of hu- 
man sexuality; truth-telling in individual life 
and in society; privacy and secrecy; ordering 
socio-economic and political life and dealing 
with the environmental consequences of 
modern technology and population; peace and 
international control of war. (Participants will 
discuss alternatives and choose a topic of inter- 
est to each in consultation with one of the pro- 
fessors, prepare an oral presentation and lead 
discussion on it, and prepare a written reflec- 
tion which they will discuss with the professors 
{Vz hour oral) at the end of the third quarter.) 



Admission of other than JSTC students only by 
approval of instructors. 
Bresnahan/Gallagher/O'Callaghan 

TT 10 : 30-11 : 45 Fall/Winter/Spring 

LSTC CT 331 
Christian Ethics 

An introductory exploration of the basic op- 
tions in Christian ethics. Contemporary moral 
issues will be viewed from the perspective of 
these options with the aim of increasing the 
sharpness of moral reflection. 
Benne MW 8: 30-9: 50 Fall 

Braaten MWF 11-11:50 Winter 

MTS T 303 (4) 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

Through lectures, papers, and discussion, there 
will be an investigation into the biblical, theo- 
logical and historical foundations that inform 
the Christian life. In this course there will be an 
emphasis upon fundamental questions of under- 
standing the nature of a Christian ethic. 
Stotts MW 11-12:50 Fall 

DEAN Thl 443 

Man in Relation to Others 

Man's relations to God: Religion. Man's rela- 
tions to his fellow men: Obedience, Truth, 
Justice. 
Falanga MWF 9-9: 50 Winter 

NBTS CHT 552 [400 level] 
Christian Ethics 

The aim of this course is to investigate the 
Christian approach to the main social issues of 
today. Consideration will be given to the bibli- 
cal and theological basis for social action. Cen- 
tral social issues, including the socio-economic 
and political structure, personal and civil rights, 
war and peace, labor and management, and in- 
terpersonal relations, will be studied. Field 
trips to social institutions will be included. 
Term paper required. Final examination. 
Young MWF 11:30-12:20 Fall 



CTS TEC 425 

Love and Justice in Christian Thought 

A critical and constructive analysis of these 
ideas on the basis of an examination of the 
thought of Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, R. 
Niebuhr, Tillich, and Daniel D. Williams. 
Meyners MF 10:30-12 Fall 



64 



CTU HDS 485 
Sin and Guilt 

This will be a study of sin and guilt, partly in 
seminar style, with emphasis on the moral and 
pastoral issues involved. Nevertheless, various 
other disciplines (scriptures, psychology, etc.) 
will be called upon for input. The main pur- 
pose of this study is to disengage the presence 
and shape of sin in our society today, and to 
fashion a corresponding pastoral response to 
the findings that emerge. To accomplish this, 
the past tradition on the meaning and effects 
of sin will be explored, as well as modern 
studies, such as those that analyze the experi- 
ence of guilt. The student will be expected to de- 
velop a position that respects the heart of the 
tradition, while speaking relevantly to the mo- 
dern experience. 
MacDonald Th 2-4:30 Fall 

MTS T 416 (4) 

Social Theory and Theological Method 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Burkhart TT 11-12:50 Fall 

CTS TEC 455 

Research Design Intensive 

A two-week intensive preceding the final year 
of the D.Min. program. A study of research 
method and design. Open only to CTS students. 
Schroeder TBA Sept. 3-12 

CTU HDS 585 

Psychology and Moral Theology 

This seminar seeks to trace the influence that 
psychology (here understood broadly, to in- 
clude all the disciplines that study, measure, 
control and treat human behavior) has exerted 
upon ethics and moral theology (the normative 
disciplines), and also upon popular mores, 
codes and standards. Problems that have arisen 
between them in the relatively short history of 
their interaction will be noted, as well as 
their attempted solutions. These solutions 
will be evaluated from the viewpoint of moral 
theology. Major requirements: responsibility 
for sample readings; a project that clearly spells 
out a position on the relationship between 
psychology and moral theology; and partici- 
pation in group programs. 
MacDonald MW 3 : 30-4 : 45 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 538 

Legal Reasoning and Theological (Ethical) 

Reasoning 

Seminar to investigate the similarities and the 



differences between the manner in which com- 
mon law judges deal with decision-taking and 
reason-giving in such matters as the right of pri- 
vacy, freedom of speech, divorce, capital pun- 
ishment, abortion, and the way in which 
ethicians, particularly theological thinkers, 
approach the same or related issues. Emphasis 
will fall upon the possibility of cross-fertilizing 
between theological reasoning and legal reason- 
ing in the context of distinctively pragmatic. 
North American characteristics of mind. Par- 
ticipants will be encouraged to add their own 
special interests in methodology to the compari- 
son. Common readings and discussion of ex- 
amples allowing comparison will be followed 
by oral reports on areas of individual choice 
according to the interest of each participant, 
and by a final written reflection from each. 
Limited to 15 students. 
Bresnahan M 7:30-9:45 pm Winter 

CTS TEC 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 

areas of Ethical Studies. 

Staff TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 



B. THINKERS AND SCHOOLS 
OF THOUGHT 

BTS B-565 

The Ethics of Paul Tillich 

A seminar study of the writings of Paul Tillich, 
especially the Systematic Theology, in order to 
discover his method, the fundamental concepts 
of his thought, and in order to assess the appli- 
cability of his ideas to contemporary issues. 
Miller Th 8-10:30 Spring 

CTU HDS 589 

Special Questions: The Moral Theology of 

Charles Curran 

This is a specialized study of a significant Amer- 
ican Catholic moral theologian, whose pur- 
pose is to appreciate his understanding of moral 
theology in the contemporary world. To 
achieve this, his thought will be traced 
through a chronological study of his major 
writings, with the focus on the issues he con- 
fronts, the principles he uses, the sources he 
draws upon, the consistency of his method, 
and the change and adaption of position he has 
made. Main requirements: reading of his major 
writings; project that seeks to measure and 
evaluate his influence on moral theology and 



65 



to evaluate his contribution to this discipline. 
MacDonald W 7-9:30 pm Spring 

CTS TEC 532a 
Whitehead 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Schroeder TTl-2:30 Fall 

CTS TEC 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 

areas of Ethical Studies. 

Staff TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 



C. ISSUES AND TOPICS 

BTS B-345 
Civil Religion 

For course description consult Historical 

Studies offerings. 

Durnbaugh Th 9:30-12 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 431 

Politics and Religion: The Issue of "Civil Reli- 
gion" 

Course to explore critically the relationship be- 
tween religious community and civil society 
in the Bicentennial Period. Initial attention will 
be directed to the development of "sociology of 
religion," which has produced the hypothesis 
of the "civil religion," with attention both to 
its roots in the work of Weber, Troeltsch, and 
Durkheim, and also to the critical basis of eval- 
uation offered by Catholic social thought which 
culminates in the Pastoral Constitution on the 
Church in the Modern World. A review of liter- 
ature dealing with Bellah's hypothesis of an 
"American Civil Religion" will follow. These 
matters will be attended to by selected readings 
and common discussion. Finally, each partici- 
pant will choose a theoretical, sociological or 
historical focus on an aspect of the subject 
which is of particular interest, prepare a report 
to be shared orally, and make a final, written 
reflection. 
Bresnahan M 7 : 30-9 : 45 pm Spring 

BTS B-466 

The Church, The State and War 

For course description consult Historical Studies 

offerings. 

Durnbaugh MWF 10 : 30-11 : 20 Spring 



CCTS 489 (4) 

The Church's Peace Ministry: Issues and per- 
spectives 

What can the churches contribute to world 
peace? What understandings of world peace 
might guide religious thought and action toward 
a world without war? What theological and 
political standards are involved in setting limits 
and determining priorities for peace activities? 
How can the concern for world peace become 
a regular part of ministry at every level of 
church life? Eight Chicago-area seminary facul- 
ty including the instructors of this course have 
met regularly as the curriculum development 
task force of the World Without War Council- 
Midwest to design an experimental course ad- 
dressing these questions. The course is expected 
to treat such topics as: the global political 
conditions for peace; the means and limits of 
citizen action for peace in the United States, 
with special emphasis on the role of the 
churches; and the theological bases for, and 
meanings of, the issues of global politics and 
citizen action. Class sessions will be held at 
North Park Theological Seminary, 5125 N. 
Spaulding Avenue, Chicago. 
Durnbaugh/Livezey /Nelson/Thompson 

Th 3 : 30-6 Spring 

CTS TEC 462 
Dynamics of Conflict 

A consideration of the types, causes, process- 
es, levels, and outcomes of conflict. Construc- 
tive and destructive uses of conflict as viewed 
in case studies. Developing a theological theory 
of conflict management. 
Foster/Meyners TT 1-2:30 Spring 

CTS TEC 445 (IV2) 

Seminar in Contemporary Black Authors in 

Religion 

Reading and discussion of selected authors, 

the authors to be announced. 

Rooks M 3:30-5 Winter 

MTS T 408 (4) 
Women's Issues : Ethics 

Focus in the course is upon ethical reflection as 
it is related to such societal issues as abortion, 
changing marriage patterns, child rearing, sin- 
glesness, rape, etc. Case studies may be used as 
a way of focusing and clarifying discussion. 
Adj W 2-4:50 Fall 



66 



CTU HDS 481 

Moral Aspects of Human Sexuality 

A study of human love and sexuality from a 
psychological and Christian perspective which 
aims to build a positive attitude toward an ap- 
proach to the meaning of human sexuality. 
Special consideration will be given to the prob- 
lems of masturbation, homosexuality, and ex- 
tra-marital intercourse. 
Lohkamp TT 12-1 : 15 Winter 

CTU HDS 482 
Moral Problems : Life 

A study of basic problems concerning human 
life: the sancity of human life, abortion, trans- 
plant, experimentation, sterilization, and gene- 
tic manipulation. 
Lohkamp W 7-9 : 30 pm Winter 

CTS CM 444 

Medical Ethics Seminar 

For course description consult Pastoral Care 

and Spiritual Direction offerings. 

Ulrich TBAn Fall/ Spring 

MTS T 424 (4) 
Seminar in Ethics 

In alternate years the seminar will address is- 
sues of current importance, with a focus on con- 
temporary sources for reflection, and persons 
of importance in the area of Christian ethical 
thought. In 1975-76, the seminar will address 
issues of current importance, with environ- 
mental ethics being a primary concern. 
Stotts M 11-12:50 Spring 

LSTC CS 428 

Christianity and Capitalism 

This course will first trace the historical rela- 
tion between the Christian faith and the devel- 
opment of capitalism. It will then move toward 
contemporary interpretations ~ both positive 
and negative ~ of modern capitalism, and con- 
clude with a critique dealing with this question: 
How compatible is the Christian ethic with the 
spirit of capitalism? 
Benne M W 3 : 30-4 : 45 Winter 

CTU HDS 584 

Moral Issues in Economics and Business 

A brief introduction into modern economic 
theories; the relationship between Christianity 
and the origins of modern capitalism; a Chris- 
tian critique of capitalism; the Corporate Re- 
sponsibility movement. Approximately one- 
half of the course will be devoted to case 
studies of typical problems confronting busi- 



nessmen today with a view to attaining group 
consensus about the just solutions to these is- 
sues. Requirements: preparation of case study 
materials; participation in class discussion; 
take-home exam or term paper of about 20 
pages. 
MacDonald/Pawlikowski Tu 7-9:30 pm Winter 

JSTC DIVN 533 

Social Ethics and Legal Institutions 

Seminar to explore the relationship between 
ethical theory and practical, contemporary 
problem areas of legal regulation of human 
activity. An initial examination by all partici- 
pants of selected aspects of the "natural law" 
tradition and of contrasting legal positivism 
through common readings and discussion will 
be followed by choice of a particular problem 
area in legal regulation of human activity by 
each participant, preparation of an oral presen- 
tation, and final written expression of some di- 
mension of the participant's reflection on the 
problem. Such questions as criminal correc- 
tion, abortion, prostitution, pornography, 
equal access to the courts, environmental pol- 
lution, planning of mass transportation, com- 
mitment procedures for the mentally ill, civil 
disobedience, conscientious objection, military 
justice system, political corruption, use of vio- 
lence by police, can be chosen with a view to 
evaluating the present effectiveness of legal 
regulation and to suggesting alternative pro- 
grams. Maximum enrollment: 15. 
Bresnahan M 7:30-9:45 pm Fall 

CTU HDS 577 

American Theology and United States For- 
eign Policy 

In this bicentennial year the course will focus 
on the influence of theological conceptions in 
early America in the development of United 
States foreign policy. There will be a brief 
overview of recent American foreign policy per- 
spectives and how they might be understood 
from a theological viewpoint. Finally the course 
will consider what directions US foreign policy 
should take in this post- Vietnam era in light of 
ethical principles. One aspect of this will be a 
discussion of foreign aid mechanisms. Course 
requirement: participation in class discussions; 
take-home exam or term paper of about 20 
pages. 
Pawlikowski Th2-4:40 Spring 

CTS TEC 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 



67 



areas of Ethical Studies. 



Staff 



TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 



V. WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

A. MISSIONS AND ECUMENICS 

LSTC MT 350 

World-Wide Christian Missions: An Introduc- 
tion 

An introduction to significant theological issues 
and concrete expressions of mission in one 
world today. Attention is given to LCA world 
mission and ecumenical involvements. 
Scherer TT 10:30-11:45 Fall 

CTU BLL 490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

For course description consult New Testament 

offerings. 

Senior/Stuhlmueller Tu 7-9 :30 pm Fall 

CTU CMM 440 

Christianity in World History: The Question 

of Prophecy Today 

To provide a basis for discussion this seminar 
will first scrutinize Arend Th. Van Leeuwen's 
hypothesis on the development of Western civ- 
ilization and its consequences for the contempo- 
rary mission of the Church. Once this theory 
is understood and critiqued, the course will 
examine how Old Testament prophecy relates 
to a prophetic stance in today's world. Particu- 
lar attention will be given to the question: is 
the "prophet" today a maker of history or a 
witness to transcendence? 
Boberg/Fox W 7-9 :30 pm Fall 

CTU HDS 446 

The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

In the light of the contemporary questioning of 
"the missions" this course will try to determine 
why the Church by her very nature must be 
missionary, what this mission means, how 
"necessary" it is in the plan of salvation, and 
how it is to be carried out in our modern, post- 
colonial world. 
Ahner TT 10:30-11:45 Fall 

CTU HDS 422 

19th Century Imperialism and World Mission 

For course description consult Historical 

Studies offerings. 

Nemer TT 10:30-11:45 Winter 



LSTC CS 428 

Christianity and Capitalism 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Benne MW 3 : 30-4 : 45 Winter 

LSTC CT 425 

The Latin American Theology of Liberation 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Braaten MW2-3:15 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 466 

The Liberationist Interpretation of Christianity 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Haight MWF2-2:50 Fall 

BTS B-442 

The Ecumenical Movement 

For course description consult Historical 

Studies offerings. 

Durnbaugh WF 8-9:20 Spring 

CTU CMM 530 

Research Seminar in Area Studies 

Individually guided reading program in the his- 
tory and culture of specific countries, as well 
as their present social, economic and religious 
situations. 
Boberg MW 3: 30-4: 45 Winter 

CTU CMM 535 

Development of the Christian Community 

After a brief survey of the biblical/theological 
basis, this seminar-type course emphasizes the 
sociological factors that bear on the process of 
Christian community formation and its rela- 
tionship to community development on the so- 
cio-economic plane. 
Boberg TT 12-1 : 15 Winter 

CTU CMM 540 
Nationalism 

A seminar that investigates the relation of mis- 
sion to colonialism and the problems in a post- 
colonial period of nationalism. Individual 
students will be expected to concentrate on 
one country or area. 
Boberg MW2-3:15 Fall 

CTU HDS 571 

American Theology and United States Foreign 

Policy 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Pawlikowski Th 2-4 : 40 Spring 



68 



B. COMPARATIVE RELIGION 

CTU HDS 320 
Phenomenology of Religion 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Schreiter MWF 12-12:50 Fall 

CTU HDS 400 

Studies in Comparative Religion 

A guided reading and discussion course for 
those students wanting a general background 
in one or more religions, and for those students 
wishing an in-depth study of a particular reli- 
gious tradition. Some emphasis will be placed 
upon confronting one's own tradition with 
those traditions studied. 
Schreiter TBAr Fall 

LSTC MT 422 

Christian Faith and the Faiths of Mankind 

Theological issues and spiritual practices of 
some major living religions are examined with 
reference to their challenge to Christian belief 
and spirituality. Possibilities and problems in 
inter-religious dialogue are also considered. 
Some field trips are included. 
Scherer TT 12-1 : 15 Winter 

LSTC MT 445 
World Religion 

A phenomenological study of world religion 
with particular attention to the resources avail- 
able in History of Religion. For students who 
have not had a college level course in world 
religions, a survey of the major world religions 
will be included. For students who have had 
such a course, attention will be directed to spe- 
cific religions or religious phenomena in 
which there is special interest. 
Lindberg MW 3: 30-4: 45 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 468 

Christianity: A Western or Universal Religion? 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Hebga TBAn Winter 

CTU HDS 453 

Myths, Signs, Symbols, Sacraments 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Heisig MW2-3:15 Spring 

CTU HDS 436 

Eschatology and Eschatologies 

A comparison of central themes in Christian 



eschatology ~ apocalyptic crisis literature, 
death, final completion of the individual and 
the world — with eschatological views in se- 
lected non-Christian religious literature. The 
comparison will be directed toward a better 
understanding of eschatological symbols and 
symbolic systems in both Christian and other 
cultural situations. 
Schreiter MWF 11-11:50 Winter 

CTU HDS 505 

Constructing Local Theologies 

A seminar geared to investigating how Chris- 
tian theological themes are developed in vary- 
ing situations, particularly those not part of 
mainstream Western culture. Students will be 
asked to choose a certain situation (e.g.. Latino, 
Black, African, Japanese) and engage in recon- 
structing some theological themes based upon 
their own background in the Western Christian 
tradition and on experience or guided reading 
in the particular cultural situation. 
Schreiter M 7-9 : 30 pm Spring 

CTU CMM 546 
Religions and Societies 

The interrelation of religion and society is 
shown by presenting and analyzing the world's 
major religious traditions against the back- 
ground of the specific cultures involved. The 
methods and insights of comparative religion, 
anthropology and sociology characterize the 
scope of this approach. 
Loiskandl MW 3 : 30-4 : 45 Fall 



VI. MINISTERIAL STUDIES 

A. FOUNDATIONS AND FUNCTIONS 
OF MINISTRY 
BTS C-387 
The Pastor and the Congregation 

The duties and responsibilities of the minister 
in the local congregation will be explored with 
special concern for pastoral care, administra- 
tion, and participation in the rites and ordi- 
nances of the church. 
TBAn MF 3: 10-4: 25 Spring 

CTS CM 305(11/2) 
Ministry in the Black Church 

An examination of the role and function of the 

Black minister in the U.S., including varieties 

of ministry and differences in style among 

them. 

Rooks M 3:30-5 Fall 



69 



JSTC DIVN 383 

Effective Pastoral Ministry 

Two theoretical orientations are making impor- 
tant contributions to the emerging understand- 
ing of contemporary ministry: (1) the Theologi- 
cal Discipline through renewed understanding 
of Revelation, Ecclesiology, and the variety of 
ministries in the Christian Tradition, and (2) 
the Behavioral Sciences through a better under- 
standing of leadership styles, communication 
skills, and the strategies of Organization De- 
velopment. This experience-based course will 
call upon these two forces to serve as the con- 
text in which the participants' awareness of their 
own ministry and confidence in that ministry 
is heightened, and constructive alternatives to 
ineffective styles of ministry are suggested. 
Special attention will be given to Listening, 
Assertion and Self -disclosure, Conflict Resolu- 
tion and Systematic Planning. Requirements to 
be negotiated. 
Myers W 10-12:30 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 366 
Practica for Ministry 

These practica will be scheduled throughout 
the year according to need. (1) Life Planning: 
concrete skills and strategies designed to help 
others slow down their environment to evalu- 
ate present commitments, study alternatives 
and make concrete decisions about possible 
changes in life direction. (2) Organization De- 
velopment: focused on skills required for ef- 
fective change within organizations, interven- 
tion leading to constructive action. (3) Ministry 
to Groups: a method and skills for creating a 
climate to promote three areas of emotional 
development - self awareness, mastery, and 
effective interaction. (4) Fantasy and Religious 
Imagination: designed to bring the student 
into contact with significant areas of non-verbal 
experience through various directed relaxation, 
fantasy and movement experiences. (5) Consul- 
tation for Organizational Development: fo- 
cused on consultation skills for ministers in- 
volved in parish or organizational development 
and designed to allow for information sharing 
and leadership support. 
Myers TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 

M/L Min 391 

Introduction to Liberal Church and Ministry 

An introductory seminar exploring models and 
problems for the practice of the Unitarian Uni- 



versalist ministry today in its various associa- 

tional contexts. 

Shadle/Beattie TBAr Fall 

MTS CA 305 (4) 

Introduction to Women's Issues 

The course will focus on the issues of sex roles 
and identity while exploring the biblical, his- 
torical, ethical and theological perspectives of 
women and the church. 
Adj TBAn Winter 

NBTS PMC 545 [300 level] 
Ministerial Duties 

The course seeks to develop an awareness in 
students of the nature and forms of ministry. 
To that end, the course deals with a theology 
of church and ministry, a review of concepts 
and styles of leadership and enablement, and 
seeks to continue a process of the development 
of skills and resources for ministry. There is 
also an emphasis on the function of ministry in 
the first pastoral setting into which a student 
will move. The course will use a variety of 
teaching styles, including lecture, discussion, 
role play, case study, student presentations, 
and media. Several guest lecturers will also 
provide input. 
Buzzard MWF 11 : 30-12 : 20 Spring 

MTS MM 411 (4) 

Dual Professional Competency Seminar 

Identification of ideologies, roles and skills 
which are common to both professional minis- 
try and professional social work, and those 
which are unique to each. Open only to stu- 
dents enrolled in the joint program of M.Div./ 
M.S.W. 
Dudley W 7-9pm Spring 

CTS CM 583 

Position Paper Seminar 

Each student will write his own constructive 
statement on the nature of ministry. Open only 
to CTS students. 
LeFevre MW 1:30-3 Winter 

CTS M 590 
Tutorial Study 

Tutorial study is available in many different 

areas of Ministerial Studies. 

Staff TBAr Fall /Winter/ Spring 



70 



B. PASTORAL CARE AND SPIRITUAL 
DIRECTION 
CTS CM 330 
Personal Transformation 

An intensive for first-year students dealing with 
the nature and dynamics of personal transfor- 
mation approached both experientially and 
theoretically. Open only to CTS students. 
Anderson TBAr Fall 

NETS PMC 522 [300 level] 
Personality and Religion 

The developmental process of behavioral matur- 
ation and growth is studied from the perspec- 
tives of the four streams of psychoanalytic, 
behavioral, existential, and social psychology 
with continuous correlation of theological per- 
spectives on the nature of man. The focus is 
on growth in personhood and in skills in pas- 
toral counseling. Experiential sessions (IVz 
hrs. a week) will explore the processes of pas- 
toral counseling with a growth orientation. 
Reading, and one depth case study will be re- 
quired. 
Augsberger T, 1:30-3:40, Th 1:10-3:40 Winter 

MTS PC 311 (4) 

Ministry and Human Relations 

This is a basic course in empathy training - 
i.e., learning to better understand what others 
are trying to communicate to us, and letting 
them know that we understand. Various ex- 
ercises, of increasing complexity, involve "live" 
role playing, tape recordings, and video tapes. 
Some attention will be given to basic communi- 
cation theory, but the emphasis is on develop- 
ing capacity for empathy. 
Stettner MTh 2-4:50 Winter 

CTUCMM330 

Pastoral Care in the Church 

Basic history, theology, dynamics and tech- 
niques of pastoral care with emphasis placed 
on the role of the minister in his/her encounter 
with people. Topics to be considered: pastoral 
care in historical and theological perspective; 
the minister's self-image and his/her capacity 
to care; the minister as professing professional; 
basic principles of pastoral care; special areas 
of pastoral concern during normal develop- 
ment and times of crisis. The purpose of this 
course is to introduce the student to the dis- 
cipline of pastoral care and to set a broad foun- 
dation from which the student can move on to 
more specialized courses. 
Mallonee MWF 9-9:50 Winter 



BTS C-380 

Counseling I : Religion and Psychotherapy 

The course will be a study of the contribu- 
tions of psychotherapy to the theological under- 
standing of the person. This will include a sur- 
vey of various developmental (personality) 
theories, the description of psychopathology in 
terms of origin, nature, and prognosis, and a 
presentation of a model theory that can be use- 
ful in pastoral counseling. The course will also 
be a brief introduction to the theory of pastoral 
counseling. 
Royer MWF 11 : 30-12: 20 Winter 

MTS CA 340 (4) 
Pastoral Care of Families 

A brief review of some current developments 
in family life in our culture, some reflections on 
understanding these developments theological- 
ly, and implications for pastoral care. 
Stettner MTh 11-12:50 Spring 



CTS CM 331 
The House Church 

The theory and ministry of the house church 
will be explored experientially and reflectively. 
Readings about small group life in the church 
and contemporary group theory. Admission 
only by approval of instructor. 
Anderson W 7-10 pm Spring 

JSTC DIVN 359 

Discernment of Spirits in the Spiritual Tradi- 
tion of the Church 

This lecture, reading, and discussion course 
will center on the continual tradition of dis- 
cernment of spirits in the Church and its redis- 
covery in different ages with a special focus on 
the discernment of spirits today. It will con- 
sider the commonalities in discernment in these 
different ages as well as the differences, depen- 
dent on persons' development in self-conscious- 
ness. These understandings will aid in the pre- 
sent re-discovery and practice of discernment. 
No prerequisites. Requirements: participation 
in class discussions and a paper. 
Robb Th 2-4:45 Spring 

CTS CM 333 

Pastoral Counseling Practicum 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Anderson TBAr Winter 



71 



MTS PC 335 (4) 

Ministry Laboratory: Socially Maladjusted 

Youth 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 

Stettner/Adj F 2-6 Winter 

MTS PC 337 (4) 

Ministry Laboratory : Older Persons 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Stettner/Adj F 2-6 Spring 

DEAN Psy 404 (2) 
Psychology of Religion 

What are the significant data of religious experi- 
ence? Which data or experience are of religious 
significance? The course will deal with these 
basic questions, aiming at developing habits of 
attention to significant data and categories 
for the organization of data that will facilitate 
theological reflection on it. 
Schultz TBAr Fall 

LSTC PC 440 
Psychology of Religion 

A review of developments in the field from the 
days of William James to the present day, with 
special attention given to the interaction be- 
tween psychology and religion at certain crucial 
points of the development as a whole. 
Kukkonen TT 10:30-11:45 Winter 

LSTC PC 420 

Personality Theory and Psychotherapy 

A seminar in which consideration will be given 
to the theoretical and therapeutic aspects of var- 
ious psychological schools of thought, begin- 
ning with Freud and Jung, including Neo- 
Freudian, Existential, Behavioristic, and Inter- 
personalistic Schools. Philosophical predisposi- 
tions and theological correlations will be borne 
in mind. Limited enrollment, admission only by 
approval of instructor. 
Swanson MW 8-9:50 Spring 

CTU CMM 400 

The Sources of Pastoral Counseling 

This course is neither an introduction to bibli- 
ography nor a survey, but an exercise in the 
reading of and working with the principal sour- 
ces of pastoral psychology, as found in Freud, 
Jung, and the originators of the more contempo- 
rary human potential movement. 
Newbold TT 9-10: 15 Spring 



CTU CMM 405 

Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

A discussion of the basic types of pastoral 
counseling in terms of goals, techniques and 
practices. A presentation and discussion of some 
typical situations in pastoral care. 
Mallonee TT 9-10: 15 Fall 

Newbold TT 9-10: 15 Winter 

NBTS PMC 521 [400 level) 

Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

Basic principles of therapeutic interaction in 
the pastoral ministry of counseling. The course 
integrates psychoanalytic, behavioral, existen- 
tial, and general systems approaches to coun- 
seling. Format will include lectures, case studies, 
sociodrama, student reports, experiential 
events, and individual conferences with the in- 
structor. A major case study style term paper 
will be required. 
Augsburger Tu 1 : 10-3 : 40 Fall 

LSTC PC 410 
Pastoral Counseling 

A consideration of the theory, nature and prac- 
tice of pastoral counseling. In addition to input 
sessions and case-oriented workshops, there 
will be supervised clinical field work with in- 
patients and outpatients. It will be taught at 
Christ Hospital. It is integrated with the course 
in Group Dynamics in a two-course offering. 
Limited enrollment, admission only by ap- 
proval of instructor. 

Swanson WF 2-4:45 Fall 

LSTC PC 430 
Group Dynamics 

Emphasis upon the learning experience amid 
the dynamic interactions and interpersonal re- 
lations of an ongoing group situation. There 
will be both psychological and theological re- 
flection as well as a consideration of communi- 
cation theory. It is integrated with the course 
in Pastoral Counseling as a two-course offering. 
Limited enrollment, admission only by approval 
of instructor. 

Swanson WF 11-12:50 Fall 

CTS CM 455 
Group Process Intensive 

A two-week intensive preceding the final year 
of the D.Min. program. An experience of build- 
ing a learning-transforming community where 
members come to know their colleagues for the 
year, understand the dynamics of community- 
building and claim their own unique learning 
needs. Open only to CTS students. 
Anderson TBAr Sept. 15-25 



72 



CTS TEC 462 
Dynamics of Conflict 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Foster/Meyners TT 1-2:30 Spring 

NBTS PMC 532 [400 level 

Conflict, Communication and Conciliation 

An exploration of approaches to the manage- 
ment and resolution of conflict in intrapersonal, 
interpersonal and group situations. The 
course will integrate the contributions of com- 
munication theory, psychodynamic insight, 
and behavioral-social research. The focus will 
be equally divided between conceptual theoreti- 
cal understandings, and experiential psycho- 
drama or sociodrama. Wide reading, presenting 
of research abstract and case studies will be 
required. 
Augsburger Th 1:10-3:40 Fall 

CTS CM 432 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

The theory and practice of marriage and family 
counseling. Attention will also be given to the 
growth and self-actualization of well function- 
ing marriages and families. Prerequisite: will- 
ingness of spouse to participate in the course 
and in a marriage workshop connected with 
the course. 
Foster W 7-10 pm Winter 

LSTC PC 450 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

A course aimed at the preparation of the pastor 
for his predominant type of counseling. At- 
tention will be directed to theories and prac- 
tices in present-day conjoint and family ther- 
apies. Consideration will be given to pre-marital 
education, divorce, sexuality, and the soci- 
ology of marriage. Limited enrollment, admis- 
sion only by approval of instructor. 
Swanson MW8-9:50 Winter 

CTS CM 442 
Human Sexuality 

In an atmosphere designed to demythologize 
sexuality, the seminar examines different sexual 
styles, behavior, experience, cultural values, 
and over-reaction to sexual stimuli. Re- 
sources from theology and the behavioral sci- 
ences are utilized as each member is asked to 
develop a value stance about sexuality for our 
time and for ministry. 
Meyners Th 2-5 Winter 



JSTC DIVN 444 

Sexuality and Pastoral Practice 

After moving through multidisciplinary per- 
spectives on the nature of human sexuality, we 
will focus on pastoral practice as rooted in the- 
ology and ethics and as practiced in specific re- 
lation to "living human documents." Each parti- 
cipant will develop a program or process to use 
in actual situations of pastoral practice. The 
entire course will embody a methodological 
study of the relations between "theology" and 
"culture" and how they affect pastoral practice. 
One individual tutorial during the quarter to 
be arranged. Limited enrollment. 
Way M 2-4:45 Spring 

CTS CM 452 

Transactional Analysis and Pastoral Counseling 

This course will explore the theory and the ex- 
periential meanings of transactional analysis as 
these relate with self-understanding, interper- 
sonal relations, and work in committees and or- 
ganizations as well as focusing on the impor- 
tance of T.A. for counseling. An experiential 
learning approach will be employed to inte- 
grate theory and practice. Attention will be 
given to relationships between T.A. and the- 
ology and Gestalt Therapy. Readings such as 
Berne, Harris, James, Jongeward, Steiner and 
Goulding will be utilized. 
Foster M 9-12 Spring 

CTS TEC 472c 

The Psychology of Maslow and its Religious 

Significance 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Foster TTl-2:30 Fall 

CTS TEC 466 
Psychosynthesis 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

Foster F 2-5 Fall 

MTS PC 405 (2) 
Understanding Dreams 

The purpose of the course is to consider the 
meaningfulness of dreams, from both a reli- 
gious and a psychological perspective. Various 
theories for understanding dreams will be con- 
sidered; biblical and historical dreams will be 
studied, as well as dreams voluntarily shared 
by members of the class. 
Stettner M 11-12:50 Fall 



73 



CTS CM 451 

Gestalt Therapy and Religious Experience 

An exploration and experiencing of Gestalt 
Therapy as one way of understanding contem- 
porary religious experience. 
Anderson Th 2-5 Fall 

CCTS 495 

Religious Experience, Spirituality, Spiritual 

Growth 

This course explores how some important spir- 
itual writers of the Roman Catholic and Baptist 
traditions deal with man's relationship with 
God and how one can arrive at a deeper experi- 
ence of God. Religious experience will be ex- 
plored starting from C. Meyer's The Touch of 
God. "Holiness" and "progress" will be 
studied in the light of personal growth, espe- 
cially from the notion of the symbolic as out- 
lined in C. A. Bernard, Initiation au language 
symboUque. Requirements: comparison be- 
tween traditional and contemporary work on 
spirituality; study journal or major paper and 
project. Initial session at CTU. 
Isabell/Buzzard TBAn Winter 

CTU CMM 410 

Ministering to Spiritual Growth 

This course presupposes CCTS 495 or its equiv- 
alent. How can a person help another in devel- 
oping a relationship with God? This question 
will be explored historically with special em- 
phasis on the desert fathers, John of the Cross 
and Francis de Sales. A theoretical section will 
provide the student with diagnostic tools useful 
in direction, and a technical part will explore 
techniques and their meaning in Christian 
growth. Requirements: one historical book, 
W. Kraft, The Search for the Holy, ]. Laplace, 
The Direction of Conscience , a traditional man- 
ual and a final project, usually an interview 
with someone in the field. 
Isabell MW 3: 30-4: 45 Spring 

MTS PC 406 (4) 

The Pastor and Community Mental Health 

The purpose of this course is to explore the 
pastor's preventive role in the area of mental 
health. It will deal with basic principles of com- 
munity mental health, identification of mental 
illness, knowledge of community resources, 
techniques of referral, and the functions of a 
congregation as a therapeutic community. 
Stettner WF 11-12:50 Fall 



JSTC DIVN 494 

Social Consciousness, Scripture, and the Spir- 
itual Exercises of Saint Ignatius Loyola 

The aim is to study Sacred Scripture and the 
Spiritual Exercises from the viewpoint of social 
awareness today. How do these documents 
from the past enable us to develop a spiritual- 
ity concerned with social issues? Format: lec- 
ture and discussion. Prerequisites: introduc- 
tory Scripture and background in systematic/ 
fundamental theology. Short written assign- 
ments to be determined. Admission only by 
approval of instructors. 
Doyle/Thompson M 2-4:45 Fall 

MTS PC 410 (2) 
Pastoral Theology 

The aim of this course is the working out of a 
theology of pastoral care. This involves con- 
sideration of the biblical, historical, and sys- 
tematic theological perspectives on pastoral 
care, as well as its relation to the modern be- 
havioral sciences. Some case material will be 
used by way of illustration, but this is not a 
"how to do it" course; rather its purpose is to 
learn to think theologically about the practice 
of pastoral care. 

Stettner Tu 11-12:50 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 465 
Issues in Pastoral Theology 

A study of selected contemporary issues of the 
field, looked at in terms of history, source, 
method and practice. Focus will center on wo- 
men and feminism in relation to the field; 
clarification of principles which differentiate 
and correlate "social justice" and "caring-coun- 
seling" perspectives; alternative formulations of 
a "theory of pastoral/priestly practice;" and 
relations between "Protestant" and "Catholic" 
pastoral theology. Each participant can nego- 
tiate her/his primary issue from a more inclu- 
sive list; planning and implementation of the 
entire course will proceed collegially. Prerequi- 
sites: some practice/ theory in the broad area 
and approval of instructor. Limited enrollment. 
One individual tutorial during the quarter to be 
arranged. 
Way M 2-4:45 Winter 

CTU HDS 485 
Sin and Guilt 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

MacDonald Th 2-4:30 Fall 



74 



LSTC PC 445 
Guilt and Grace 

A study of the contributions of psychology and 
theology to the understanding of the problem 
of guilt and its resolution. The course is set 
up in such a way as to encourage and facili- 
tate group teaching and learning. 
Kukkonen TT 8:30-9:45 Fall 

M/L MIN 405 
Shame and Guilt 

An attempt will be made to develop a theoreti- 
cal framework for understanding shame and 
guilt, their distinctive character, relationship, 
and role in moral development, pathology, 
and therapy. Attention will be given to such 
issues as the psychology of narcissism, the psy- 
chology of conscience, the relation of guilt 
and aggression, and moral sentiments and re- 
lated affects. Shame and guilt in religious life. 
Theological interpretations of shame and guilt. 
Readings will include the works of Fingarette, 
Goffman, Lifton, Helen Lewis, Helen Merrell 
Lynd, Mowrer, Piers and Singer, Ricoeur, Sar- 
tre, and Tomkins. 
Schneider TBAr Spring 

CTS CM 438 

Issues and Crises of Middle Age 

An examination of the developmental tasks and 
crises of the middle years of life. Female and 
male experiences with marriage, vocation, fami- 
ly, and life's meaning will be explored. The re- 
sponse of the church and ministry to these per- 
sons will be studied. 
Anderson Th 7-10 pm Spring 

CTS CM 475 

Seminar in Death and Dying 

Open to a limited number of theological stu- 
dents (majority of students are medical and 
nursing). Admission only by approval of in- 
structor. Clinical credit may be awarded to ad- 
vanced students. 
Ulrich TBAn Fall/Winter/Spring 

CCTS 491 

Grief, Death and Dying 

A study will be made of the person's relation to 
his/her own death: a typology of attitudes to- 
ward dying, theories of progression through 
different attitudes, and the right of the person to 
die with dignity. Exploration will be made of 
the students' attitudes toward dying, and to- 
ward the dying person. If it is possible to ar- 



range contacts, students will have opportuni- 
ties to visit with, learn to know, and offer pas- 
toral care and counseling to a person or persons 
nearing death. 
Royer/Augsberger Th 1:10-5 Spring 

CTS CM 444 

Medical Ethics Seminar 

Clinical review of medical ethics' issues. Open 
to a limited number of theological students 
(majority of students are medical and nursing). 
Consent of instructor required. Clinical credit 
Admission by approval of instructor. Clinical 
credit may be awarded to advanced students. 

CCTS 490A, B, C (4 each quarter) 
Ministry Laboratory : Religion and Health 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 

Fichette/Schneider/Stettner/Mendes 

F 1-5 -I- Lab Fall/Winter/Spring 

CTU CMM 406 

Practicum in Basic Types of Pastoral Counsel- 
ing 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Newbold TT 12-1: 15 Spring 

DEAN Tpw 420 (2) 

Pastoral Care of the Mentally 111 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Piacitelli Field Fall/ Spring 

DEAN Tpw 421 (2) 

Pastoral Care of the Physically 111 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Piacitelli Field Fall/Spring 

DEAN Twp 440, 441, 442 (2 each quarter) 
Pastoral Care Through Deaconship 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Piacitelli Field Fall/Winter/Spring 

M/L MIN 404 

Supervision in Pastoral Care: Case Study 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Schneider F 1-4 Fall 

BTS C-582 

Introduction to Group Counseling and Therapy 

Attention will be given through the structure of 
the seminar to the theory of group counseling 



75 



and therapy and the implication for ministry. 
Each student will serve as counselor to a group 
at least twice. Each student will also select a 
theme relevant to the subject and present a 
paper to the seminar on that theme. (C-480 
or its equivalent is a prerequisite.) 
Royer Th 3:30-6 Winter 

BTS C-584 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

The seminar will study the dynamics of mar- 
riage and family relationships and the nature of 
pastoral counseling as related to marriage and 
family problems. An attempt will be made to 
relate seminar members to given families as the 
pastoral counselor for the quarter. Reflection 
on the counseling contacts will become an agen- 
da for the seminar group. 
Royer Tu 7-9 : 30 pm Spring 

NBTS PMC 527 

Marital and Family Therapy 

Theory and therapy of the marital dyad, the 
family triangles, and the family system. The 
course will integrate the approaches of conjoint 
family therapy and general systems theory. 
Lectures, experiential process, sociodrama, case 
studies, audiovisuals will be utilized to assist 
the student therapist in growth toward effec- 
tive therapeutic intervention in families in 
crisis. 
Augsburger Tu 1 : 10-3 : 40 Spring 

CTU CMM 508 

Existential Psychotherapy and Pastoral Prac- 
tice 

This course examines the important influence 
that existential philosophy has come to have 
upon the development of psychotherapy. Em- 
phasis will be placed upon the contributions to 
psychotherapy made by the existential analysis 
and interpretation of individual experience in 
a crisis society. The authors studied will be: 
Paul Tillich, Ludwig Binswanger, Medard Boss, 
Thomas Hora, F. J. J. Buytendijk, Rollo May 
and Eugene Kahn. 
Newbold W 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

CCTS 501 (2) 

Symposium in Psychology and Religion 

The course will be different each time it is of- 
fered, as it will focus on some persons, topics, 
or issue of current interest in the broad 
fields of psychology and religion. Instructors 
from various schools, experts on pertinent sub- 



jects, or representatives of other religious 
groups may be involved. The particular focus 
for the course will be announced at least one 
quarter in advance. Initial session at LSTC. 
Stettner/Cluster Pastoral Care Faculty 

W 2-3: 50 Spring 

CTU CMM 509 

Psychology and Religious Experience 

The course will attempt to uncover the psy- 
chological roots of religion and to examine 
methodological problems involved in the study 
of religious experience. It will also consider the 
relationship between Christian orthopraxis and 
various forms of psychotherapy. 
Heisig M 2-3 : 15 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 594 

Dynamics of the Spiritual Exercises 

This lecture, reading, and discussion course 
will focus on the theological and psychological 
dynamics of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Igna- 
tius Loyola. Seen as a radical gospel or con- 
version experience, the Spiritual Exercises will 
be considered as an articulation of St. Ignatius' 
conversion experience and in the light of present 
psycho-theological understanding of conver- 
sion. Pre-requisites : a personal familiarity with 
the Spiritual Exercises either through the experi- 
ence of directed retreats or through personal 
study of them. Requirements: participation in 
class discussion and a paper. 
Robb Th 2-4:45 Winter 

BTS C-581 

Seminar in Advanced Pastoral Counseling 

The student will be asked to maintain a counsel- 
ing relationship throughout the quarter, giving 
periodic "case reports" to the seminar. These 
will be explored in terms of (1) the develop- 
ment of the counselee's problem situation, 
(2) the dynamics of the counselor's personhood 
in terms of helpfulness or interference in the 
counselee's growth, and (3) the nature of the 
counseling relationship, psychologically and 
theologically. There will be a special emphasis 
for the year. C-480 or its equivalent is a pre- 
requisite. 
Royer Th3:30-6 Fall 

CTS/CRPC CM 530a, b, c 
Pastoral Counseling I Seminar 

CM 530a, 530b, and 530c provide a series of 
courses to define the issues in the practice of 
pastoral psychotherapy including: assessment. 



76 



interpretation of data, metapsychological per- 
spectives, ego assessment, characterological 
and symptomatic diagnosis, therapeutic alli- 
ance, transference, and the structures of the 
therapeutic process. Additional tuition charge 
may be required. Pre-requisites: CM 530b 
and 530c each require the previous course or 
courses. 
Mason Tu 2-5 Fall/Winter/Spring 

CTS/CRPC CM 531a, b, c 
Pastoral Counseling II Seminar 

A second year continuation of CM 530 includ- 
ing work in marriage, family, divorce, crisis, 
sexuality, and other counseling as well as a 
seminar experience in relating and integrating 
the insights of religion and psychology as they 
are revealed through the therapeutic experi- 
ence. Pre-requisite : CM 530. Additional tuition 
charge may be required. 
Mason Th 10-11:30, 3:30-5 Fall/ Winter/Spring 

CTS/CRPC CM 575a, b, c 
Pastoral Care Practicum I 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Mason TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 

CTS/CRPC CM 576a, b, c 
Pastoral Care Practicum II 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Mason TBAr Fall /Winter/ Spring 

CTU CMM 505 

Advanced Practicum in Pastoral Counseling 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Bush/Chiaramonte TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 

C. LITURGY AND WORSHIP 

CTS CM 312 

Church Worship Design and Leadership 

A practicum focusing upon the analysis and 
development of effective worship materials, 
symbols, language, music, prayers, movement, 
liturgy, etc. 
Zikmund MF 10:30-12 Fall 

DEAN Ltg 332 (2) 

Liturgical Structures and Forms 

A study of the liturgical languages, formularies, 
actions, symbols, and utensils. Each is studied 
in its historical, symbolical, and practical uses. 



Part of the course includes a bibliographical 
survey of the sources for the study of the Lit- 
urgy. 
Falanga MTh 10-10:50 Fall 

DEAN Ltg 341 (2) 
Theology of the Liturgy 

A presentation of the liturgy as the continua- 
tion of the Paschal Mystery; the culmination 
and the source of the life of the Church and of 
the Christian in the Church. 
Persich TBAr Winter 

DEAN Ltg 345 (1) 
Liturgical Ceremonies I 

A liturgical and rubrical study of the Roman 
Breviary, with emphasis upon the interpreta- 
tion of the Psalms in their liturgical setting. 
Fischer TBAr Spring 

DEAN Ltg 346 (1) 
Liturgical Ceremonies II 

A study and supervised practice of the rubrics 
of the Eucharistic Celebration and of the Sacra- 
ments in preparation for ordination to the 
Priesthood. 
Hartenbach TBAr Spring 

NETS PMC 541 [300 level) 
Worship in the Church 

This course is concerned with various aspects 
of worship in the church, from the theology of 
worship to the effective conduct of services. 
Consideration is given to traditional, liturgi- 
cal, and free-church forms, and to contempo- 
rary patterns of worship. Special attention is 
given to baptism and the Lord's Supper, and to 
weddings and funerals. Requirements: reading; 
laboratory experience in communion; baptism; 
wedding; funeral; reading report; final exami- 
nation. 
Enright Th 10 : 45-11 : 20, Labs TBAr Winter 

LSTC WO 325 
Hymns in Worship 

A course designed to survey the heritage of 
hymns which the Christian Church has devel- 
oped over twenty centuries of history; to de- 
velop an appreciation of the many differing 
styles of the many best-known authors who 
have contributed, something about the differ- 
ing styles of tunes to which they have been 
sung, and the ways in which they can be used 
to enhance personal and corporate worship 
in our own day. 
Lundeen M 7-10 pm Spring 



77 



NBTS PMC 520 [300 levell 
Introduction to Church Music 

The purpose of this course is to show the many 
ways in which the rich musical heritage of the 
church supports and expresses the faith of the 
church. Practical exposure and experience is 
a part of the course. 
Eckert Th 9:30-10:20 Fall /Winter/ Spring 

JSTC DIVN 328 

Practicum in Liturgical Planning 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Serrick TuF 1-2:30 Fall /Winter/ Spring 

JSTC DIVN 326 

Liturgy Practicum : Eucharist and Homiletics 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Serrick MW 1-2 Fall 

JSTC DIVN 327 

Liturgy Practicum : Sacraments 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Serrick MF 1-2 Winter 

MTS L 418 (2) 

Theology and the Practice of Worship 

An introduction to the theology, history and 
practice of Christian worship. Special attention 
to the Directory of the Worship of God and the 
Worshipbook of the United Presbyterian Chur- 
ch in the U.S.A. Five week intensive, to be con- 
ducted during the first five weeks of the quar- 
ter. 
Adj F 2-4: 50 Fall 

BTS C-471 

Preaching and Worship 

For course description consult Preaching and 

Communications offerings. 

Kennel Tu 4 : 45-6, 7-9 : 30 pm Fall 

CTU HDS 515 

Art of Christian Celebration 

A study of the nature of ritual and the laws of 
ritual development. Analysis of the constitu- 
tive elements of rite (sign and symbol, language, 
gesture, music, dance) and their relationship 
to the ministerial role in celebration. A consi- 
deration of certain problems and developments 
in liturgical experimentation. 
Dorff TT 10 : 30-11 : 45 Spring 



CTU CMM 518 
Practicum in Liturgy 

An examination of the theology and the general 
principles pertaining to liturgical celebration 
and the proper role of the minister in liturgy. 
Study of ritual and practical considerations in 
the celebration of wedding, funeral and sacra- 
mental liturgies. Practical, moral, canonical 
and pastoral considerations pertaining to the 
sacrament of penance. Special treatment of the 
principles of Eucharistic celebration. Individual 
practical exercises in administration of penance 
and celebration of Eucharist. 
Staff Th2-4:30 Spring 



D. PREACHING AND COMMUNICATIONS 

BTS C-371 

The Minister as Communicator 

A study of communication as interpersonal and 
intentional interaction with accent upon at- 
titudes of communication as ministry/ministry 
as communication, as well as the communi- 
cator's own charisma. Principles and practices 
of effective communication are applied in the 
various situations of ministry. This experience 
consists of three hours in class and one hour in 
supervised laboratory work with the use of 
audio-visual equipment. 
Kennel WF 8-9:20 Fall 

NBTS PMC 542 (300 levelj 
Principles and Practice of Preaching I 

The course combines consideration of the the- 
ology of preaching and the nature of biblical 
preaching with the actual preparation and de- 
livery of sermons. Student's manuscript sermons 
and preached sermons are evaluated by the 
class. Sermons delivered in class are video- 
taped to help students evaluate and improve 
their own preaching. Required: Sermon; read- 
ing; paper. 
Enright Th 10 : 45-11 : 20, Labs TBAr Spring 

MTS L 305 (4) 
Introduction to Preaching 

The proclamation of the Word in the Reformed 
tradition, its theology and practice. The place 
of preaching in the contemporary Church. As- 
signed readings in homiletics, the reading, hear- 
ing, and analysis of sermons. Consideration of 



78 



types and styles of preaching. The structure of 
sermons, approaches to sermon preparation, 
development of sermonic ideas, actual prepara- 
tion of outlines and plans, and the writing of at 
least one sermon. 
Adj W 2-4: 50 Winter 

MTS L 311 (4) 
Practice Preaching 

The preparation, writing, and delivery of ser- 
mons, the number depending on the size of class 
or sections. Class evaluation of sermons preach- 
ed, their content, structure, and delivery. Use 
of video-tape recording of student preaching 
for viewing in conference with the instructor. 
Prerequisite: L 305. 
Adj TT 11-12:50 Spring 

CTS CM 301 
Preaching Practicum 

This course is designed for those who expect 
to be parish ministers. Participants will preach 
regularly. In addition to preaching, participants 
will consider their roles in corporate worship, 
weddings, funerals, baptisms, etc. The emphasis 
will be upon developing self-critical faculties 
for continued growth in the forms of ecclesias- 
tical communication. 
Kemper/Brightbill W 9-12 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 374 
Practicum in Preaching 

A practicum in preaching homilies, sermons, 
and retreat talks, offered in the Spring Quarter 
for two hours a week. Use of audio and video 
taping; exploration of ways to construct, de- 
liver and critique presentations; and arrange- 
ments for some presentations to be done in 
actual settings. Limited to 8 JSTC students, in 
third year theology and/or deacons. 
Mainelli TBAr Spring 

JSTC DIVN 326 

Liturgy Practicum : Eucharist and Homiletics 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Serrick MW 1-2 Fall 

BTS C-471 

Preaching and Worship 

A laboratory course combining preaching and 
worship in a unified consideration. Emphasis is 
given to the study of classical and contempo- 
rary principles and methods of preparing and 
delivering sermons that speak to pastoral, pro- 
phetic and pedagogical needs; a search is made 



for forms and styles for the free church as it 
celebrates the presence and power of God as 
experienced in the life of the community. Actual 
services that integrate theology, phenomenol- 
ogy and contemporary media are prepared 
and presented; audio and visual tapes are used 
for evaluation purposes and group analysis. 
(C-371, or equivalent, is a prerequisite) 
Kennel Tu 4 : 45-6, 7-9 : 30 pm Fall 

DEAN Spc 423 (1) 

The Ministry of Preaching 

The theory and practice of composing and de- 
livering of a sermon. Units: the Ministry of 
Preaching; the Theology of Preaching; Steps 
in Sermon Composition; Principles of Rele- 
vancy, Interest, and Support; the Selection and 
Use of Materials; Outlines; Introduction and 
Conclusion. 
Miller F 9-9:50 Fall 

DEAN Spc 424 (1) 
Preaching the Homily 

The nature of the homily is discussed. Methods 
of fulfilling the homiletic requirements are ex- 
plained and practiced. Units: The Nature of the 
Homily; a Format for the Homily; Variety in 
the Style of the Homily; Total Environment of 
the Homily; Evaluation of the Homily. 
Miller TBAr Winter 

CTU CMM 455 

Sermon Design : Methods and Theory 

Study and practice in the basic elements of 
sermon production: creativeness in sermon pre- 
paration; determining the theme; organization; 
style; delivery; and judging results. 
TBAn TBAn TBAn 

LSTC PR 420 
Christianity and Tragedy 

A seminar which probes the relationship be- 
tween a tragic sense and vision of life and a 
Christian one, and the bearing of this rela- 
tionship on theological understanding and 
Christian proclamation. Basic readings are 
dramatic works of tragedy and selected sermons 
of Paul Tillich. Limited enrollment, admission 
only by approval of instructor. Initial session 
at LSTC. 
Niedenthal Th 2-4:30 Fall 

LSTC PR 425 

The Novels and Sermons of Frederick Buechner 

A seminar which investigates the language, 
form and theological implication of the stories 
and sermons of the contemporary novelist and 



79 



preacher, Frederick Buechner. Limited enroll- 
ment, admission only by approval of instruc- 
tor. 
Niedenthal Th 2-4:30 Winter 

CTU CMM 450 
Practicum in Preaching 

A workshop style criticism of written and 
delivered sermons. Individual criticism and 
practice using video-tape equipment. 
TBAn TBAn TBAn 

DEAN Spc 433 (1) 
Preaching Practicum I 

Presentation of a homily to lay persons invited 

to the seminary for evaluation. 

Miller Th9-9:50 Fall 

DEAN Spc 434 (1) 
Preaching Practicum II 

Presentation of a homily to lay persons invited 

to the seminary for evaluation. 

Miller TBAr Spring 

DEAN Spc 443 (1) 
Preaching Practicum III 

Preparation for and evaluation of preaching 

experiences, conducted in a discussion format. 

Taped recordings of actual presentations are 

evaluated. 

Miller Th 8-8:50 Fall 

DEAN Spc 444 (1) 
Preaching Practicum IV 

Practice in Priesthood ministries. 

Miller TBAr Spring 

M/L MIN 461 

Practicum in Preaching and Worship 

An exploration of worship and the role of 
preaching in worship, including sermon pre- 
paration and actual preaching. 
Scholefield TBAr Spring 



of communication. Units: 
Communicatior. Process; 
Voice - Melody, Time, Force; 
Audience Analysis. 
Miller TBAr 



The Nature of the 
Voice Production; 



Bodily Action; 



Winter 



DEAN Spc 414 (1) 

Communication in the Christian Assembly 

This course aims at strengthening the founda- 
tions upon which the seminarian can build his 
effective communication of the Word of God, 
conceived in the broad aspects of all the situa- 
tions in which he will be responsible for the 
Word of God. Units: Oral Interpretation of 
the Word of God; Various Speeches, Inter- 
views, Discussion, Drama, Radio, Television, 
Films; Teaching in General, and Religion 
Teaching in Particular; Retreats, Workshops, 
Institutes. 
Miller TBAr Spring 



BTS C-473 

Mass Communication, Society and the Church 

An analysis of contemporary media as art 
forms and social commentary and influence, 
and an exploration of the implications of this 
communication revolution for the church's 
education, worship and mission. Areas for in- 
vestigation include theory, theology, creativity, 
effects, strategies, ethics, and controls of radio, 
television, film, print, advertising, public opin- 
ion and polls. Course approaches include semi- 
nars, conferences, productions and field trips. 
The class will participate in the day-long Con- 
ference on the Religious Use of Cable-TV to be 
sponsored by the Cluster and the Midwest Re- 
ligious Broadcast Council on Thursday, Novem- 
ber 13 at LSTC. Initial session at BTS. 
Kennel Th 9:30-12 Fall 



CTS TEC 412 
Communication 

For course description 

Studies offerings. 

R.Snyder TT 8: 30-10 



consult Theological 
Spring 



DEAN Spc 413 

Basics of Communication 

Review of the general principles and practices 



E. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

CTS TEC 301 
Christian Existence 

For course description consult Theological 

Studies offerings. 

R. Snyder TBAr Fall 



80 



M/L MIN 382 

The Educating Ministry 

How do we grow people committed to ideas 
and ideals, emersed in ritual and ceremony, 
rooted in history, and convinced of being his- 
tory makers, with the belief that individual wel- 
fare is linked to the welfare of others? Persons 
who can be defined as Un-Selfs? 
Williams TBAr Winter 

MTS CE 305 (4) 

The Teaching Ministry of the Church 

A study of the teaching ministry of the church 
with attention to historical perspectives, educa- 
tional theory, patterns of objectives, adminis- 
trative procedures, and styles of teaching with 
the variety of age groups and situations. 
Priester MW 11-12:50 Winter 

NETS PMC 501 [300 level) 
Teaching Ministry in the Church 

This course is a general introduction to the 
theological and socio-cultural foundations of 
Christian education. Students are assisted in 
planning instructional objectives, teaching/ 
learning experiences and practice teaching in a 
small group. Students prepare to teach one in- 
structional unit from denominational curricula. 
Students may concentrate reading in one foun- 
dational area, final written examination and/or 
individual learning contract. 
Jenkins WF 8-9:15 Winter 

LSTC RE 330 

Baptism, First Communion and Confirmation 
Ministry 

A study of the biblical, historical and doctrinal 
aspects of this ministry and its development in 
the church today. Particular emphasis will be 
placed on in-depth study of curriculum, teach- 
ing methods and programs for baptism, first 
communion and confirmation. 
Bozeman MW2-3:15 Fall 

LSTC RE 342 

The Bible and Christian Education 

A study of the nature and content of the Bible 
together with a pedagogy appropriate to an edi- 
fying use of the Bible. 
Norquist MWF 12-12:50 Spring 

NBTS PMC 507 [300 level] 
Group Process in the Church 

An understanding of group process is achieved 
by the members functioning as a group with the 
teacher as a trainer/facilitator. Through read- 
ings, participation, and feedback students gain 



insight into their interpersonal relationships and 
roles in groups. Students share leadership and 
gain experience with different leadership styles 
and techniques in facilitating personal growth 
and group goals. Students are expected to uti- 
lize group process principles in their leadership 
of small groups in church-settings. Readings: 
group leadership design and evaluation. Final 
examination or alternate learning contract. 
Jenkins M 7-9 : 30 pm Fall 

BTS C-399 

The Development of Conscience 

A consideration of the biblical doctrine of 
conscience in comparison with various contem- 
porary views of the development of moral 
judgment, especially those of Piaget, Erikson 
and Freud. The course focuses upon the stages 
of moral development and pathology as well 
as the implications of such development for the 
educational and pastoral care programs of the 
church. 
Miller MWF 11 : 30-12 : 20 Spring 

JSTC DIVN 381 
The Valuing Process 

Values Clarification has more recently emerged 
as a key tool for ministry. This course deals 
with both the theoretical and skill components 
necessary for fostering effective valuing. By 
personally experiencing the valuing processes 
along with related readings and cognitive in- 
put, participants simultaneously explore their 
own values while learning methods they can 
use in their ministerial settings both now and in 
the future. This course, therefore, has two 
foci (1) discovery and development of one's 
own value system, and (2) learning the theoreti- 
cal basis and pastoral strategies necessary to 
move ministerial situations from the fact and 
theory levels to the personal relevance of the 
values level. Requirements to be negotiated. 
Myers W 10-12:30 Spring 

NBTS PMC 502 [300 level) 

Organization and Administration in Christian 

Education 

The course is a study in management theory 
and its application to church organization par- 
ticularly as it relates to the educational program 
of the congregation. Students will study, ob- 
serve and evaluate church-related educational 
programs and design and use evaluative instru- 
ments. The students will report on projects in 



81 



class. Evaluation based on individual learning 
contract. 

Mull WF 1:10-2:30 Spring 

BTS C-391 

DEAN ThI 308 

The Effects of Indigenization on the Principles 

of Religious Education 

An examination of the nature and function of 
religious education in the wake of impending 
indigenization movements. Readings, discus- 
sion, lectures, and projects. Class sessions held 
at BTS. 
Pero Th 11-12, 1-2:40 Spring 

LSTC RE 425 

Global Conscientization and its Effects on Reli- 
gious Education Relative to the Black Com- 
munity 

A careful study and evaluation of a pedagogical 
process by which a person or a people gain a 
new awareness of their own reality, the forces 
which objectify and oppress them within that 
reality, and the potentiality for becoming the 
subjects of their own liberation (redemption) 
as well as becoming the agents of change for re- 
ligious education. Readings, discussions, lec- 
tures, projects. 
Pero TT 8: 30-9: 45 Spring 



BTS C-490 

Curriculum of Christian Education 

Heckman M 3: 10-5: 40 



Winter 



MTS CE 410 (4) 

Resources for Church Education 

Comparative Studies of materials for use in the 

development of teaching in the church. 

Priester Th 2-4 : 50 Spring 

MTS CE 404 (4) 

The Teaching Ministry with Children 

Studies in alternative ways to minister with 
children in the church. Attention will be given 
to programs of teaching, factors of growth 
and development, peer relationships, family 
and school. 
Priester W 7-9 :50 pm Winter 

NBTS PMC 504 [400 level) 
Teaching Children in the Church 

This course is a combination of educational 
theory and practice in teaching children. An 
understanding of the development and growth 
of children is integrated into a teaching style 
and methodology appropriate to communi- 
cating faith to young children. Observation, 
evaluation and practice teaching are included 



in the design. ABC curricula and that of other 
denominations are utilized. Requirements: a 
reading report; an observation and teaching 
experience with children; a project or a research 
paper and a final examination. 
Maase Tu 7-9 :30 pm Spring 

MTS CE 420 (2) 

Confirmation and Church Education 

Attention will be given to theological under- 
standings and ecclesiastical practices in con- 
firmation as well as teaching programs leading 
to confirmation. 
Priester M 11-12:50 Fall 

MTS CE 405 (4) 

The Church's Ministry with Youth 

The bulk of the course will be workshops focus- 
ing on media, process designs, value clarifica- 
tion tools, role plays, improvisations, resources, 
games, liturgical dance and worship skills. 
Overviews and models will be presented for a 
ministry with youth. Youth will be present as 
enablers. Philosophy and practical implementa- 
tion will be central to the course. 
Myers M 2-4 : 50 Spring 

NBTS PMC 505 [400 level) 
Ministry with Youth 

The purpose of this course is to extend the 
student's skills in teaching and ministry with 
youth. An intensive relationship with one 
young person requires at least an hour's inter- 
view each week and verbatim records are main- 
tained. Students plan and carry out either a 
week-end youth retreat or a weekly youth club 
for teaching /learning experiences with youth. 
Students serve on a teaching team for leading a 
seminar session on assigned readings and reflec- 
tion on interviews. The group develops an an- 
notated list of resources for youth ministry. A 
notebook reporting and evaluating the above 
experiences is required. 
Jenkins/Sattler M 7-9 :30 pm Winter 

JSTC DIVN 469 

Practicum in Team Retreats for Adults 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
Dugan / Heineman / Kem p 

Th 1-3 Fall 

TBAr Winter/Spring 

LSTC RE 455 
Teaching Seminar 

An advanced seminar for the student to spe- 
cialize in the practice and critique of his/her 
teaching. Students will have an on-going teach- 



82 



ing experience during this quarter and will use 
the seminar hours to evaluate that teaching by 
peer review, analysis of tapes of sessions, ex- 
ploring additional options for teaching, and 
analysis of theory and methodology. 
Bozeman MWF 11-11:50 Spring 

NBTS PMC 503 [400 level] 
Methods of Teaching 

Students will seek to integrate a teaching style 
based on: (1) a theory of learning; (2) writing 
behavioral objectives; (3) designing teaching/ 
learning experiences; and (4) evaluation of 
educational outcomes. Students will plan an in- 
structional unit using the ABC or other de- 
nominational curricula resources. The class will 
become a teaching laboratory for students 
where appropriate. Other teaching settings may 
be arranged. Practice teaching credit for addi- 
tional quarters may be arranged. On site super- 
vision and curricula resources must be approved 
in advance. 
Jenkins MWF 11 : 30-12 : 20 Fall 

CTU CMM 560 

The Interpretive Dimension of Ministry 

A seminar dealing with the understanding of 
ministry, its functions, and in particular with 
the problems related to understanding, trans- 
lating, and communicating the Christian mes- 
sage in educational ministry. Limited to 12 stu- 
dents. 
Mainelli MW2-3:15 Winter 

MTS CE 502 (4) 

Learning Theory and Church Education 

A critical examination of prominent learning 
theories in relation to the theory and practice 
of teaching in the church. 
Priester F 2-4: 50 Fall 

CTU CMM 563 

Structuring a Parish Model of Educational 

Ministry 

A seminar exploring the practice of parishes 
in educational ministry, and developing theo- 
logical principles for critiquing these practices 
and toward a model for more effective min- 
istry to the total parish. Will entail some work 
in developmental theories, models of the 
church, and organizational principles. Limited 
to 12 students. 
MainelU MW2-3:15 Fall 

NBTS PMC 509 

Research Seminar in Christian Education 

Advanced students may design an independent 
course of study. The seminar will meet to share 



research designs, review and evaluate project 
reports. Discussion on major issues in the field 
will assist the student to integrate learnings 
from other courses. Preparation will be made 
for the special field examination. 
Jenkins Th 1:10-3:40 Winter 

DEAN Tpw 504 (6) 

Extended Religious Education and Practicum 

For course description consult Supervised Min- 
istry offerings. 
PiacitelU/Falanga Field + Th 10:10-11:30 

Fall/ Winter/Spring 

For additional courses consult the offerings of 
the Center for Studies in Religious Education, 
pp. 109-111. 



F. ORGANIZATION AND 
ADMINISTRATION 

MTS CA 309 (4) 

Polity, Politics, Presbyterianism 

An introduction to Presbyterian pohty, includ- 
ing preparation for the standard Ordination 
Examination. Includes a study of the historical, 
theological and political basis for the rules and 
procedures by which the church does its work. 
Contemporary trends in the development of 
polity will be included. 
Worley M 2-4: 50 Fall 

NBTS PMC 502 [300 level] 

Organization and Administration in Christian 

Education 

For course description consult Religious Edu- 
cation offerings. 
Mull WF 1 : 10-2 : 30 Spring 

BTS C-484 

Church Organizational Behavior 

Using the biblical concepts of the kingly work 
of Christ and the body of Christ as an orga- 
nism, this course will view church organiza- 
tion as a strategic approach to revitalizing the 
congregation. Both theory and practice will be 
involved. 
Wieand 3 weekends, TBAn Winter 

LSTC RE 430 

Church Administration: Congregation, Synod 

and Churchwide 

A study of church polity and administration in 



L 



83 



the Lutheran Church from the historical and 
practical perspectives. Principles of Organiza- 
tional Development will be used to study the 
policies and administrative life of the church 
and the functioning of the pastor and the laity. 
Bozeman MW 2-3 : 15 Winter 

MTS CA 414 (4) 
Congregational Administration 

An introduction to the dynamic behavior of 
congregations with emphasis on theology, con- 
cept, skills, and tools needed for effective man- 
agement. 
Worley M 2-4:50 Spring 

G. CHURCH AND COMMUNITY 

CTS TEC 320 

Social Transformation: Church and Com- 
munity 

For course description consult Ethical Studies 

offerings. 

Meyners TBAr Fall 

MTS MM 312 (4) 

Evangelism, Social Action and Stewardship 

A study of the church as God's agent in society, 
including witnessing, service, reconciliation and 
confrontation. Students will be expected to 
develop their theologies to unite the congrega- 
tion in love and service. Specific attention will 
be given to the program resources of the United 
Presbyterian Church, USA, in preparation for 
the Standard Ordination Examinations. 
Dudley WF 11-12:50 Spring 

NETS PMC 551 (300 level] 
Contemporary Evangelism 

This course is designed primarily as an ac- 
tion/interaction/reaction course in the field of 
contemporary evangelism, focusing on the 
evangelistic mission of the church today. 
Various procedures and methods will be used; 
testing and examination of available tools and 
materials; role playing; psychodrama, and 
problem solving. Guest lectures will be featured 
for specialized types of evangelism; field trips to 
significant outposts will be made. Required: 
reading and research paper. 
Brown Thl:10-3:40 Fall 

MTS MM 432 (4) 
Small Congregations 

Study of problems and resources for 
congregations under 250 members with limited 
growth potential: including congregational life 
and leadership, unique program and resources 
beyond survival, and a variety of alternatives 



for expansion of the budget, pastoral leadership, 
through fraternal churches, yoked parishes, lay 
pastors and tentmaking ministries. 
Dudley M 7-9:50 pm Winter 

MTS MM 406 (4) 

Church Strategies in Changing Communities 

Study of the causes and patterns of changing 
communities, and the alternative strategies 
available to the church. Special attention will be 
given to the variety of resources and options 
available to the congregation and to regional 
church judicatories, and to the consequences of 
various decisions which churches have made. 
Open to pastors, laypersons and students. 
Dudley Sat 10-12 noon Winter 

MTS MM 411 (4) 

Dual Professional Competency Seminar 

For course description consult Foundations and 

Functions of Ministry offerings. 

Dudley W 7-9 pm Spring 

NETS CHT 523(400 level) 
The Church and Social Change 

A study of the role of the Christian Church in 
affecting social change, both in the past and the 
present. A significant part of this study will 
focus on the roles of Black churchmen and 
Black congregations as change agents. Each 
student will be expected to present a paper to 
the class, embodying significant research and 
reflection. Assigned readings will be discussed. 
Blanford Th 7-9:30 pm Spring 

NETS PMC 554(400 level) 

Practicum in Urban Church and Ministry 

The aim of this course is to glean un- 
derstandings of the role of the urban church in 
contemporary society; and to provide usable 
tools to assist local congregations in formulating 
goals relative to their own unique understanding 
and acceptance of its mission as the church of 
Christ. Special emphasis will be placed upon 
achieving the above objectives within the con- 
text of the Black church. 
May Th 7-9:30 pm Fall 

For additional course consult the offering of the 
Institute on the Church and Urban-Industrial 
Society, pp. 111-112. 

H. CANON LAW 

DEAN Law 315 (2) 
Principles of Law 

The introductory part deals with the dogmatic 



84 



basis of canon law, its nature, history, sources, 
and bibliography. In this part of the course 
canon law is presented as an effort on the part 
of the Church to bring the teaching of Christ in- 
to the life of the ecclesial community. From this 
point of view canon law is a part of practical 
theology, like catechetics, preaching, moral and 
pastoral theology, etc. After these fundamental 
concepts a brief history of canon law and its 
scources is given and, finally, the student 
becomes acquainted with the general 
bibliography as a tool for his study. 
Danagher M W 9-9 : 50 Winter 

CTU HDS 447 

Church and Structure : Theology and Law 

A study of ecclesiological thought and attempts 
to concretize the theory, particularly in legal 
structures. The course involves historical sur- 
vey, as well as examination of the con- 
temporary tensions between theory and struc- 
ture. Treats theory and practical problems of in- 
terpretation of law in the contemporary 
Church. 
Bonner TT 12-1: 15 Fall 

CTU CMM 420 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey of present canonical prescriptions, 
conciliar norms and current practical ap- 
plication of legislation regarding the ad- 
ministration and reception of the sacraments. 
Particular emphasis on matrimonial law and 
practice. 

Bonner TT 9-10: 15 Fall 

Bonner TT 10:30-11:45 Spring 

DEAN Law 418 (2) 
Administrative Law 

This includes the whole third book of the Code, 
with the exception of sacraments and sacramen- 
tals, sacred seasons, vows and oaths, and 
benefices. It deals with sacred places, divine 
cult, ecclesiastical magistry, Church institutions 
and temporal good of the Church. 
Danagher MW 9-9:50 Fall 

DEAN Law 419 (2) 
Procedures and Penalties 

In order to do efficient work among his people, 
the priest must know not only the rights and 
duties of various persons in the Church, but 
also the way in which these rights and duties are 
enforced; he must have the basic knowledge of 
procedure, and a more specific knowledge of 
procedures frequently used in the Church, such 



as matrimonial procedure and due process. The 
Church will retain a certain number of 
penalties. The priest must understand their 
nature, their purpose, and the cases in which 
they are incurred in order to prevent his people 
from incurring these penalties and to help them 
in their reconciliation with the Church. 
Danagher MTh 9-9:50 Spring 



I. THEOLOGICAL LIBRARIANSHIP 

MTS Bb 402 (4) 
Theological Librarianship 

Consideration will be given to such areas as the 
role of the library in education for ministry, 
theological reference materials, budgetary con- 
trol, and other aspects of seminary library ad- 
ministration; sources, and problems in 
classification and cataloging; attention will be 
also given to the development of a theological 
point of view on information science. Basic 
library courses in reference and cataloging are 
pre-requisite. 
Schmitt/Hilgert/Hilgert Th2-4:50 Winter 

J. SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

CTS CM 333 

Pastoral Counseling Practicum 

For advanced students who are doing coun- 
seling. Verbatims and tapes by the students are 
the data for reflection on the theory and prac- 
tice of pastoral counseling. Admission only by 
approval of instructor. 
Anderson TBAr Winter 

CTS CM 370a 

The Young Child and the Family 

Clinical experience in helping young children 
with the growing they are working on. One full 
morning a week in the Nursery School and a 
conference with staff at noon to talk over the 
morning. Also an hour-and-a-half class session 
once a week to work on theory and practice. 
Prerequisite: TEC 301. Clinical credit awarded. 
M. Snyder TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 

CTS CM 370b 

The Young Child and the Family : Advanced 

Work 

For those who want further experience and 
deeper knowledge of theory. One full morning 
in the Nursery School plus staff conferences. 



85 



Prerequisite: CM 370a. Clinical credit awarded. 
M. Snyder TBAr Fall/ Winter/Spring 

CTU CMM 380, 385, 390 
Pastoral Work Program 

The pastoral work program provides guided ex- 
posture to the social and ecclesiastical scene in 
Chicago through direct experience of select 
ministerial activity. Reflection on this experi- 
ence is correlated with course work being taken. 
Six to eight students are grouped into a team 
headed by a theological reflector. 
Staff TBAr Year Long 

DEAN Tpw 310 (0) 
Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Orientation to TPW (Training in Pastoral 
Work), introductory readings, and lectures, 
with intensive experiences and site visits to 
programs for disadvantaged people. 
Piacitelli Tu, Field Fall 

DEAN Tpw 311, 312 (2 each quarter) 
Pastoral Care of the Disadvantaged 

Varied experiences in helping activities as spon- 
sored by social and community organizations in 
the Chicago area. Full working day; once each 
week, in centers participating in care offered 
varied ethnic groups living in disadvantaged 
circumstances. Guidance in work with youth, 
adults, aged, given by agencies' staff personnel. 
Reports and supervisory seminar at DeAndreis 
once each week. 
Piacitelli TT, Field Winter/Spring 

JSTC DIVN 328 

Practicum in Liturgical Planning 

Engages the participants in planning and 
executing parochial liturgies with appropriate 
supervision. Evaluative procedures include 
video-taping actual celebrations and in- 
terviewing those who participate in the liturgies. 
Operative theories in the art of celebration 
emerge for critical appraisal in the course of the 
practicum. Limited to 6 students. 
Serrick TuF, 1-2:30 Fall /Winter /Spring 

JSTC DIVN 326 

Liturgy Practicum : Eucharist and Homiletics 

Intended for those who are approaching or- 
dination to the priesthood. It encompasses the 
art of presiding at the Eucharist and leading 
community celebration. Homiletics is handled 
as an organic part of this presidential style. 
Workshop activities are coupled with critical 
appraisal and peer evaluation. Limited 
enrollment. 
Serrick MW 1-2 Fall 



JSTC DIVN 327 

Liturgy Practicum : Sacraments 

Designed for those students who are ap- 
proaching ordination to the priesthood or those 
who will be engaged in parochial work in 
various capacities. Encompasses the art • of 
preparing and leading community celebrations 
of the sacraments other than the Eucharist as 
well as various forms of community prayer and 
para-liturgical services. Limited enrollment. 
Serrick MF 1-2 Winter 

JSTC DIVN 374 
Practicum in Preaching 

For course description consult Preaching and 

Communications offerings. 

Mainelli TBAr Spring 

MTS PC 335 (4) 

Ministry Laboratory: Socially Maladjusted 

Youth 

The course is a basic one in the ministry of car- 
ing, which includes "laboratory" experience 
with a particular population as well as a semi- 
nar for reflection and discussion. The course 
will be held off campus and will involve the 
chaplain (or another staff person) in the locale 
of the course. The purpose is to explore the 
meaning of pastoral care with a specific group 
of people, which involves deepening self- 
knowledge on the part of the "pastor" as well 
as learning more specifically the needs of the 
persons the pastor seeks to serve. 
Stettner/Adj F 2-6 Winter 

MTS PC 337 (4) 

Ministry Laboratory : Older Persons 

The course is a basic one in the ministry of 
caring, which includes "laboratory" experience 
with a particular population as well as a semi- 
nar for reflection and discussion. The course 
will be held off campus and will involve the 
chaplain (or another staff person) in the locale 
of the course. The purpose is to explore the 
meaning of pastoral care with a specific group 
of people, which involves deepening self-know- 
ledge on the part of the "pastor" as well as 
learning more specifically the needs of the per- 
sons the pastor seeks to serve. 
Stettner/Adj F 2-6 Spring 

CCTS 490A,B,C, (4 each quarter) 
Ministry Laboratory : Religion and Health 

This seminar will be devoted to exploring issues 
of religion and health as they are found in dia- 
logue with our contextual experience of minis- 
terial praxis in pastoral visitation and care at 



86 



Illinois Central Community Hospital. This year- 
long course may be taken for one or more quar- 
ters, as a student desires. Students will be as- 
signed to rotating services (medical, surgical, 
etc.) in the hospital, and will spend approxi- 
mately three to four hours weekly engaged in 
pastoral care in the hospital. There will also be 
a weekly two-hour reflection seminar led by the 
course faculty. In addition, students will be in- 
volved in appropriate hospital events, including 
a general orientation period, participation in 
patient-centered conferences with other 
health care professionals, auditing of grand 
rounds, and participation in general in-service 
and continuing education programs as seems 
appropriate to the interest of both students and 
hospital staff. Students will also prepare con- 
tact-reports and have an opportunity to conduct 
chapel services in the hospital. Reflection Semi- 
nar meets Friday, 3-5 pm; Patient-Centered 
Conferences usually meet Friday 1-3 pm. An 
all-day orientation session (9 am - 4 pm) will be 
held the first Friday of each quarter: Fall, 
October 3; Winter, January 9; Spring, April 2. 
Course will meet at Illinois Central Com- 
munity Hospital, Classroom 16, 5800 S. Stony 
Island Ave., Chicago. Enrollment limited to 8 
students; admission only by approval of in- 
structors. 
Fichette/ Schneider/ Stettner/Mendes 

Fl-5 +Lab Fall/Winter/Spring 

CTS CM 470 

Clinical Pastoral Education 

(In conjunction with Clinical Pastoral Education 
Centers of the ACPE.) C.P.E. may be used as 
preparation for parish ministry, chaplaincy, 
teaching, counseling, and certification as a 
C.P.E. supervisor. It brings the student into 
supervised encounter with persons in crisis in 
order that "living human documents" might be 
studied in relation with scientific methods and 
theological perspectives. (Under certain con- 
ditions CTS students may be allowed up to 2 
academic credits after successful completion of 
the program. Clinical credit also awarded.) 
Staff TBAr Year Long 

CTS CM 471 
Family Pastoral Care 

(In conjunction with Swedish Covenant 
Hospital and the Family Institute of Chicago.) A 
two-year program (7 quarters or 21 months) 
with six quarters of participation in C.P.E. and 
the added dimension of training in the theory 



and practice of family therapy, to increase 
knowledge of families and effectiveness in 
dealing with family problems. (Under certain 
conditions CTS students may be allowed up to 
2 academic credits after successful completion 
of the program. Clinical credit also awarded.) 
Staff TBAr " Yearlong 

CTS CM 480 (1) 

Case Conference and Workshop in Professional 

Ministry 

The case conference will meet 5 times each quar- 
ter in which students will report on the nature 
and function of ministry in their clinical 
placement, in dialogue with faculty and student 
respondents. The workshop will occur once 
each quarter as an all-day session. It will be 
focused on a single issue in ministry about 
which the class sees the need for further in- 
vestigation. In the third quarter the student will 
be required to present a paper outlining a viable 
concept of ministry. One academic credit will be 
offered for the completion of three-quarters' 
participation. Open only to CTS students, who 
may enroll in either of the first two quarters 
without credit. Designed primarily for third 
year students, it is open to others by approval 
of the instructor. 
Meyners T 4 : 30-6 Year Long 

CTU CMM 406 

Practicum in Basic Types of Pastoral 

Counseling 

A prerequisite for this offering is CMM 405, or 
equivalent. The course is a practicum; with em- 
phasis in the practicum on reality practice role- 
play, relative to specific types of pastoral coun- 
seling situations. Follow-up is offered in the 
form of evaluation sessions. Verbatim reports 
will also be required, and evaluation will be 
given in both individual and group sessions. 
Newbold TT 12-1 : 15 Spring 

CTU CMM 450 
Practicum in Preaching 

For course description consult Preaching and 

Communications offerings. 

TBAn TBAn TBAn 

CTU CMM 480, 485, 490 
Field Education Project I, II, III 

With reflective seminar W or Th, 1 : 30-3 

Year Long 

CTU CMM 497 
Pastoral Internship (PI) 

A two-quarter pastoral internship for priests, 
deacons, and non-ordained ministers under the 



S7 



guidance of qualified supervisors. The in- 
ternship begins with a workshop in which the 
interns and supervisors together plan and con- 
tract for the goals, tasks, and methods of evalu- 
ation of the intern experience. There is a regular 
schedule of reports to and evaluation by the 
supervisor and CTU Director of Field Education 
during the course of the program. Further 
details are available from the Office of the 
Director of Field Education. 

By Arrangement 

DEAN Twp 420 (2) 

Pastoral Care of the Mentally III 

Day-long (working hours) experience once each 
week, with sampling of dimensions of Clinical 
Pastoral Education, is the setting of a psychia- 
tric hospital, with seminars, lectures, work re- 
ports on pastoral visitation of patients; group 
discussions; supervision on job by Chaplain 
Supervisor and at DeAndreis through peer- 
group supervisory seminar once each week. 
(Limited to nine students in group). 
Piacitelli Th, Field Fall /Spring 

DEAN Tpw 421 (2) 

Pastoral Care of the Physically 111 

Same as Tpw 420 but in the setting of a general 
hospital. (Limited to nine students in group). 
Piacitelli Th, Field Fall/Spring 

DEAN Tpw 440, 441, 442 (2 each quarter) 
Pastoral Care Through Deaconship 

Open to those who have completed 310 and 420 
sequences and have been ordained deacons. 
Based on experience of being deacon, and on 
functioning as deacon, particularly in setting to 
which deacon has been assigned for weekend 
duty and for giving assistance in other ways 
compatible with scholastic responsibilities. 
Reflection each week in seminar by peer group 
on sermons as delivered and recorded in Sunday 
worship and on other reports based on ex- 
periences in role as deacon. Individual super- 
visory sessions bi-weekly. 
Piacitelli Field Fall/Winter/Spring 

JSTC DIVN 469 

Practicum in Team Retreats for Adults 

This practicum in team retreats for adult groups 
will be supervised by Srs. Irene Dugan, r.c, 
Gloria Heineman, r.c, and Joyce Kemp, r.c. 
Students will be assisted in the planning and 
preparation of team retreats for a variety of 
adult groups. The use of media, group 
dynamics, and individualized guidance and 



direction will be part of the experience. The 
practicum extends through all three quarters, 
and each student will participate in three week- 
end retreats and a Lenten series during the 
courses of the year. The practicum will begin 
with an introductory group weekend experi- 
ence at the Longwood Cenacle, September 26- 
28. A Spring Quarter seminar will develop out 
of the experience of giving the retreats. Topics 
will be decided in collaboration with the stu- 
dent participants. Limited to nine students. 
Interview with supervisors required before reg- 
istration. (For non-JSTC M.Div. students, 
equivalent to nine quarter hours Supervised 
Ministry.) 

Dugan/Heineman/Kemp Th 1-3 Fall 

TBAr Winter/ Spring 

LSTC PC 410 
Pastoral Counseling 

For course description consult Pastoral Care and 
Spiritual Direction offerings. 
Swanson WF 2-4:45 Fall 

LSTC RE 455 
Teaching Seminar 

For course description consult Religious 

Education offerings. 

Bozeman MWF 11-11:50 Spring 

M/L MIN-404 

Supervision in Pastoral Care: Case Study 

Conference for Returning Interns and C.P.E. 

Students 

Each participant will present a case study from 
the internship or C.P.E. experience, with at- 
tention to personal development, vocational 
identity, and institutional and theological issues. 
Schneider F 1-4 Fall 

M/L MIN-461 

Practicum in Preaching and Worship 

For course description consult Preaching and 

Communications offerings. 

Scholefield TBAr Spring 

CTS CM 570 (2) 

Clinical Course and Case Conference 

Seminar discussions will deal with the analysis 
of case materials prepared by students arising 
out of their clinical situations. Open only to 
CTS students. 
Foster/Schroeder F 2-5 Winter 

CTS/CRPC CM 575a, b, c 
Pastoral Care Practicum I 

Provides a supervised experience of the par- 
ticipant's counseling activities. The course 



88 



provides individual one-to-one supervision, peer 
supervision, clinical case conferences, and open 
agenda peer conferences. CM 575b and CM 
575c continue the experience in the Winter and 
Spring quarters. Pre or Co-requisite: Cm 530 
a, b, and c, and approval of instructor. May 
provide clinical credit. Additional tuition charge 
may be required. 
Mason TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 

CTS/CRPC CM 576a,b,c 
Pastoral Care Practicum II 

A second year continuation of CM 575. May 
provide clinical credit. Pre-requisite: CM 575, 
and approval of instructor. Additional tuition 
charge may be required. 
Mason TBAr Fall /Winter/ Spring 

CTS CM 585 (2) 

Clinical Course and Conference on Professional 

Papers 

Presentation and discussion of professional 

papers. Open only to CTS students. 

Meyners F 2-5 Spring 

CTU CMM 505 

Advanced Practicum in Pastoral Counseling 

Prerequisite is CMM 405, or equivalent. The 



practicum requires enrollment for all three quar- 
ters. It consists of live counseling of high school 
students, with on-going supervision on a weekly 
basis. 
Bush/Chiaramonte TBAr Year Long 

CTU CMM 518 
Practicum in Liturgy 

For course description consult Liturgy and 

Worship offerings. 

Staff Th2-4:30 Spring 

DEAN Tpw 504 (6) 

Extended Religious Education and Practicum 

Seminar in theological and psychological 
techniques underlying religious education of 
young adults. Research aimed at working out 
normative standards for viable curricula for use 
in CCD programs at high school level and at 
educating lay leaders to conduct CCD at this 
level. 
Piacitelli/Falanga Th, 10:10-11:30 -I- Field 

Fall /Winter /Spring 

For additional placements consult offerings of 
the Center for Studies in Religious Education, 
pp. 109-111, and the Institute on the Church 
and Urban-Industrial Society, pp. 111-112. 



89 



CLUSTER PERSONNEL 

FACULTY AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

EUGENE AHNER, S.V.D. (CTU) Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Divine Word Seminary, Techny; S.T.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome; Ph.D. (Cand.), Fordham University. 

PHILIP A. ANDERSON (CTS) Professor of Pastoral Theology B.A., Macalester 
College; B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 

ARTHUR OLOF ARNOLD (LSTC) Professor of Practical Theology 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Northwestern University; D.D., Pacific Lutheran College; Study, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota; University of Chicago. 

DAVID AUGSBURGER (NBTS) Professor of Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 
B.A., Eastern Mennonite College; B.D., Eastern Mennonite Seminary; Ph.D., 
School of Theology at Claremont. 

PAUL H. BEATTIE (M/L) Minister-in-Residence and Visiting Lecturer (Minister, 
All Souls Unitarian Church, Indianapolis) 
A.B., Mt. Union College; B.D., Meadville Theological School. 

ROBERT BENNE (LSTC) Associate Professor of Church and Society 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study, 
University of Erlangen. 

REIDAR B. BJORNARD (NBTS) Professor of Old Testament Interpretation 

Cand. TheoL, University of Oslo; Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary; Study, Uppsala University; American School of Oriental Research, Jeru- 
salem. (Sabbatical, Fall and Winter Quarters). 

COLVIN BLANFORD (NBTS) Instructor in Black Studies and Urban Church 
(Pastor, First Baptist Church, Gary) 

B.A., San Francisco State College; B.D., Berkeley Baptist Divinity School; 
Rel.D., School of Theology at Claremont. 

JOHN BOBERG, S.V.D. (CTU) Assistant Prof essor of Mission Theology 

B.A., Divine Word Seminary, Techny; S.T.L., D.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian 
University, Rome. 

ROBERT G. BOLING (MTS) Professor of Old Testament 

B.S., Indiana State College; M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Study, American School of Oriental Re- 
search, Jerusalem. (On leave, all year). 

DISMAS BONNER, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Canon law 

B.A., Quincy College; J.C.B., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 
J.C.L., J. CD., Catholic University of America. 

JEAN BOZEMAN (LSTC) Assistant Professor of Religious Education 

A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College; M.A., Temple Univeristy; M.A.R.S. (Cand.), 
University of Chicago; Study, Michigan State University; Millersville State 
College. 

CARL EDWARD BRAATEN (LSTC) Professor of Systematic Theology 

A.B., St. Olaf College; B.Th., Luther Theological Seminary; Th.D., Harvard 
University; Fulbright Scholar, University of Paris (Sorbonne); Sinclair Kennedy 
Traveling Fellow, University of Heidelberg. 

MANFRED T. BRAUCH (NBTS) Assistant Professor of New Testament Interpre- 
tation 

B.A., Houghton College; B.D., North American Baptist Seminary; Th.M., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., McMaster University; Study, Uni- 
versitat Hamburg; Theologisches Seminar der Deutschen Baptisten. 

90 



JAMES F. BRESNAHAN, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Moral Theology 
A.B., College of the Holy Cross; M.A., Ph.L., S.T.L., Weston College; J.D., 
LL.M., Harvard Law School; J.C.B., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; 
M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University. 

ALVIN F. BRIGHTBILL (CTS) Director of Speech Laboratory; Professor Emeritus 
of Speech and the Fine Arts in Religion, Bethany Theological Seminary 
B.S., Elizabethtown College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; B.Mus., 
M.Mus., Northwestern University; D.D., Bethany Theological Seminary. 

ARTHUR S. BROWN (NBTS) Instructor in Evangelism (Pastor, Western Springs 
Baptist Church, Western Springs) 

B.A., M.A., Wheaton College; Ph.D. (Cand.), New York University; Study, 
Biblical Seminary in New York; The Sorbonne; Heidelberg University. 

DALE W. BROWN (BTS) Professor of Christian Theology 

B.A., McPherson College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Ph.D., North- 
western University. 

C. HASSELL BULLOCK (NBTS) Instructor in Biblical Studies (Associate Professor 
of Biblical Studies, Wheaton College) 

B.A., Samford University; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Hebrew Union College ~ Jewish Institute of Religion. 

RALPH WENDELL BURHOE (CCTS) Director, Center for Advanced Study in 
Religion and Science; Professor Emeritus of Theology and Science, Meadville/ 
Lombard Theological School 
Sc.D., Meadville /Lombard Theological School. 

JOHN E. BURKHART (MTS) Professor of Systematic Theology 

B.A., D.D., Occidental College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
University of Southern California; Study, University College, London. 

J. PATOUT BURNS, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Historical Theology; 
(CTU) Lecturer in Church History 

B.A., M.A., Spring Hill College; M.Div., Regis College, Willowdale; M.Th., 
St. Michael's College, Toronto; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University. 

HAROLD BUSH (CTU) Visiting Professor of Psychology (School Psychologist, 
St. Francis de Sales High School, Chicago) 

Ph.B., University of Chicago; M.A., Roosevelt University, Ph.D., Illinois 
Institute of Technology. 

LYNN R. BUZZARD (NBTS) Assistant Professor of Ministry and Director of Field 
Education 

B.A., M.A.T., M.Div., Duke University; S.T.D. (Cand.), San Francisco Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

EDWARD F. CAMPBELL (MTS) Francis A. McGaw Professor of Old Testament 
B.A., Yale University; B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University. 

RICHARD W. CARLSON (MTS) Instructor in Education and Ministry 

B.A., North Park College; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

FRANK CHIARAMONTE, C.S.Sp. (CTU) Visiting Professor of Psychology (Prin- 
cipal, St. Francis de Sales High School, Chicago) 

S.T.L., S.T.D. , Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; M.Sc. (Psychology), 
Chicago State University. 

FORREST S. CLARK (NBTS) Assistant Professor of Bibliography and Librarian 
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University; M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; M.S. in L.S., University of North Carolina. 

91 



ADELA YARBRO COLLINS (MTS) Instructor in New Testament 

B.A., Pomona College; M.A., Ph.D. (Cand.), Harvard University; Study, 
University of Portland; University of Tubingen. 

JOHN R. CONNERY, S.J. (JSTC) Professor of Moral Theology 

Litt.B., Xavier University; M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.L. West 
Baden College; S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. (Academic 
Leave, 1975-76; Research Fellow, Kennedy Center for Bio-Ethics, Washington, 
D.C.; Visiting Professor of Moral Theology, Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome). 

JOHN J. DANAGHER, CM. (DeAn) Canon Law, Sacramental Theology 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; J. CD., University of St. Thomas, 
Rome. 

JOSEPH DeVAULT, S.J. (JSTC) Professor of Biblical Theology y 

Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden College; M.A., Loyola Univer- 
sity, Chicago; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University; S.S.L., Pontificio Istituto 
Biblico; (Sabbatical Leave, 1975-76; Dr. and Mrs. E. J. McCormick Faculty 
Fellow). 

LOIS DIDEON, r.c. (CTU) Instructor in First Year Program; (JSTC) Assistant, 

Ministerial Program (Retreat Director and Pastoral Counselor, Longwood 

Cenacle, Chicago)^ 

A.B., Seattle University; M.A. (Theology), Andover-Newton Theological 

School. 
MARY DONAHEY, B.V.M. (CTU) Visiting Professor of Ethics (Assistant Profes- 
sor of Religious Ethics, Mundelein College) 

B.S., Creighton University; M.A. (Theology), Marquette University; M.A. 

(Philosophy), Columbia University; Ph.D., Columbia University and Union 

Theological Seminary. 
FRANCIS DORFF, O.Praem. (CTU) Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., St. Norbert College; S.T.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; 

S.T.D., Institut Catholique, Paris; Visiting Scholar, University of California, 

Berkeley, and Graduate Theological Union. 

JAMES J. DOYLE, S.J. (JSTC) Professor Emeritus of Fundamental Theology 

A.B., St. Louis University; Ph.L., S.T.L. , West Baden College; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Toronto; S.T.D., L'Imaculee-Conception, Montreal. 

CARL S. DUDLEY (MTS) Associate Professor of Ministry 

B.A., Cornell University; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; D.Min., McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary; Study, New York School of Social Work; Wash- 
ington University. 

IRENE DUGAN, r.c. (JSTC) Assistant, Ministerial Program (Retreat Director, 
Longwood Cenacle, Chicago) 
Study, Hunter College; Dominican College, San Rafael. 

DONALD F. DURNBAUGH (BTS) Professor of Church History 

B.A., Manchester College; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania. 

RICHARD D. ECKERT (NBTS) Instructor in Church Music Administration (As- 
sociate Pastor, North Shore Baptist Church, Chicago) 
B.M.E., Wheaton College; M.Div., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

J. RONALD ENGEL (M/L) Assistant Professor of Social Ethics 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; B.D., Meadville Theological School; Ph.D. 
(Cand.), University of Chicago, Divinity School 



92 



WILLIAM G. ENRIGHT (NBTS) Instructor in Preaching and Worship (Pastor, 
First Presbyterian Church, Glen Ellyn) 

A.B., Wheaton College; B.D., Fuller Theological Seminary; Th.M., McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 

ROBERT ALLEN EVANS (MTS) Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Applied 
Christianity 

B.A., Yale University; B.D., Yale Divinity School; Th.D., Union Theological 
Seminary; Study, University of Edinburgh; University of Basel; Free Univer- 
sity of Berlin. (On leave, all year) 

ANTHONY J. FALANGA, C.M. (DeAn) Systematic Theology and President 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; S.T.L., S.T.D., Catholic University of 
America. 

WAYNE L. FEHR, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology 

A.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden College; M.A., Loyola Univer- 
sity, Chicago; S.T.L., Sankt Georgen, Frankfurt; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale Uni- 
versity. 

GEORGE A. FICHETTE (CCTS) Supervisory Resident, Department of Pastoral 
Care and Education, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center 
B.A., Rutgers University; M.Th., D.Min., University of Chicago. 

JAMES A. FISCHER, C.M. (DeAn) Sacred Scripture 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; S.T.L., Catholic University of America; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute. 

ROBERT HARLEY FISCHER (LSTC) Professor of Church History 

A.B., Gettysburg College; B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg; 
Ph.D., Yale University. 

EDMUND J. FORTMAN, S.J. (JSTC) Professor Emeritus of Historical Theology 
A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., M.A., St. Louis University; S.T.L., 
St. Mary's College, Kansas; S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 

ARTHUR L. FOSTER (CTS) Professor of Theology and Personality and Direc- 
tor, Center for The Study of Theology and the Human Sciences 
B.A., McMaster University; B.D., McMaster University, Divinity School; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

THOMAS FOX, O.F.M. (CTU) Instructor in Old Testament Studies 

B.A., Quincy College; S.T.B., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 
S.T.L., Catholic University of America; Dr.Theol. (Cand.), Friedrich-Wilhelm 
University, Bonn. 

WESLEY JOHN FUERST (LSTC) Associate Professor of Old Testament and Dean 
of Faculty 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., Central Lutheran Theological Semi- 
nary; Th.D., Princeton Theology Seminary; Study, University of Erlangen. 

JOHN A. GALLAGHER, S.J. (JSTC) Lecturer in Moral Theology 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., West Baden College; M.Div., Regis 
College, Willowdale; M.A., Ph.D. (Cand.), University of Chicago. 

RICHARD B. GARDNER (BTS) Visiting Lecturer in New Testament Studies (Edi- 
tor for Biblical Resources, Parish Ministries Commission, Offices of the General 
Board of the Church of the Brethren, Elgin) 

B.A., Juniata College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; Dip. in Theol., 
University of Wurzburg. 

DENNIS GEANEY, O.S.A. (CTU) Associate Professor of Ministry and Director of 
Field Education 

A.B., Villanova University; M.A. (Economics), Catholic University of Amer- 
ica. 

93 



FRANCIS GERMOVNIK, CM. (DeAn) Librarian 

B.A., University of Ljubljana, Yugoslavia; M.A.L.S., Rosary College; J.C.L., 
J. CD., University of St. Thomas, Rome. 

JOHN CHARLES GODBEY (M/L) Associate Professor of Church History and 
Acting Academic Dean 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., Federated Theological Faculty, 
University of Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

MYRON GOHMANN, CP. (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

L.Hist.E., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

JOHN R. GORMAN (DeAn) Psychology (Associate Pastor, St. Michael's Church, 
Orland Park) 

B.A., M.A., S.T.D., St. Mary of the Lake Seminary; Ph.D., Loyola University, 
Chicago. 

WARREN F. GROFF (BTS) Professor of Christian Theology and Dean 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Yale Dvinity School; Ph.D. Yale University. 

WILLIAM G. GUINDON, S.J. (JSTC) Dean 

A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.L., S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 

ANNE A. HAHN (CTU) Acquisitions and Catalog Librarian 

A.B., Kirkland College; M.L.S., College of Librarianship, University of South 
Carolina. 

ROGER D. HAIGHT, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology 
B.A., M.A., Berchmans College, Cebu; S.T.B., Woodstock College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

JOHN A. HARDON, S.J. (JSTC) Research Professor of Fundamental Theology 
A.B., John Carroll University; M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.L., 
West Baden College; S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 

WILLIAM E. HARTENBACH, CM. (DeAn) Church History, Patrology 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.A., Ph.D. (Cand.), Catholic Univer- 
sity of America. 

ZACHARY HAYES, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., Quincy College; Dr. TheoL, Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn; 
Litt.D., St. Bona venture University. 

MEINRAD P. HEBGA, S.J. (JSTC) Visiting Professor of Fundamental Theology 
(College Libermann, Douala, Cameroun) 

S.T.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; L. en Phil., Sorbonne; L. es 
Sc.Soc, Institut Catholique, Paris; D. en Phil., University of Rennes. 

SHIRLEY J. HECKMAN (BTS) Visiting Lecturer in Christian Education (Consul- 
tant for Educational Development, Parish Ministries Commission, Offices of the 
General Board of the Church of the Brethren, Elgin) 

B.A., University of Denver, M.R.E., Iliff School of Theology; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Denver. 

PHILIP JAMES HEFNER (LSTC) Professor of Systematic Theology 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., Chicago Lutheran Theological Semi- 
nary; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; Fulbright Scholar, University of 
Tubingen. 

GLORIA HEINEMAN, r.c. (JSTC) Assistant, Ministerial Program (Retreat Direc- 
tor, Longwood Cenacle, Chicago) 
A.B., Mt. Mercy College. 

JAMES W. HEISIG, S.V.D. {CTU) Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Religion 
B.A., Divine Word College, Epworth; M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; 
M.Th., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Cambridge University. 

94 



JAMES HENNESEY, S.J. (JSTC) Professor of Historical Theology and President 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., Woodstock College; M.A., 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America. 
EARLE HILGERT (MTS) Professor of Bibliography and Biblical Studies and Di- 
rector of Studies 

B.A., Walla Walla College; B.D., Adventist Theological Seminary; M.A., 

University of Chicago, Graduate Library School; D.TheoL, University of 

Basel. 
ELVIRE HILGERT (MTS) Assistant Librarian 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.L.S., Catholic University of America; Study, 

Adventist Theological Seminary; University of the Philippines, Manila; Uni- 
versity of Basel. 
DAMIEN ISABELL, O.F.M. (CTU) Assistant Professor of Spiritual Theology 

B.A., Quincy College; S.T.B., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 

S.T.L., S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 
E. ALFRED JENKINS (NBTS) Professor of Christian Education and Acting Dean 

(Winter and Spring, 1976) 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
THEODORE W. JENNINGS, Jr. (CTS) Assistant Professor of Theology 

B.A., Duke University; B.D., Ph.D., Emory University. 
ROBERT KARRIS, O.F.M. (CTU) Assistant Professor of New Testament 

B.A., Quincy College; S.T.B,, Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 

S.T.L., Catholic University of America; Th.D., Harvard Divinity School. 
JOYCE KEMP, r.c. (JSTC) Assistant, Ministerial Program (Retreat Director, 

Longwood Cenacle, Chicago) 

B.A., Mount Mary College; M.Ed., Boston College. 
ROBERT KEMPER (CTS) Adjunct Faculty in Preaching (Senior Minister, First 

Congregational Church, Western Springs) 

B.A., Cornell College; M.Div., Chicago Theological Seminary. 
DENNIS KENNEDY, CM. (DeAn) Pastoral Care and Ministry 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.Div., DeAndreis Seminary. 
LeROY E. KENNEL (BTS) Professor of Communications 

B.A., Goshen College; M.A., Iowa State University; B.D., Goshen College 

Biblical Seminary; Ph.D., Michigan State University. (Sabbatical Winter and 

Spring Quarters). 
AXEL CHRISTENSEN KILDEGAARD (LSTC) Professor of Functional Theology 

A.B., State University of Iowa; Cand.TheoL, Grand View Seminary; S.T.M., 

Yale University. 

WALTER JACOB KUKKONEN (LSTC) Professor of Systematic Theology 

B.S., Northern Illinois University; M.Div., S.T.M., S.T.D., Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Study, Concordia Theological Seminary, Springfield; 
Suomi Theological Seminary; University of Helsinki. 

ANDRE LACOCQUE (CTS) Professor of Old Testament and Director, Center for 
Jewish-Christian Studies 
D.Litt., D.TheoL, University of Strasbourg. 

CALLISTUS LANGERHOLZ, O.F.M. (CTU) Associate Professor of New Testa- 
ment Studies 

Lic.TheoL, Universitas Alexandrina, Ljubljana, Slovenia; S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., 
Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome. 



95 



EUGENE A. LaVERDIERE, S.S.S. (JSTC) Visiting Professor of Biblical Theology 
(Assistant Professor, Department of Theology, John Carroll University) 
B.A., M.A., John Carroll University; S.S.L., PontiBcio Istituto Biblico; Eleve 
titulaire, Ecole Biblique, Jerusalem; M.A., Ph.D. (Cand.), University of Chi- 
cago. 

PERRY D. LeFEVRE (CTS) Professor of Theology and Dean 

B.A., Harvard University; B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago. (Sabbatical, Fall Quarter). 

RICHARD M. LELIAERT, O.S.C. (CTU) Assistant Professor of Doctrinal The- 
ology 

B.A., St. Francis College; S.T.B., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., 
Graduate Theological Union. 

DAVID LLOYD LINDBERG (LSTC) Associate Professor of Missions and Director 
of Field Education 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

WILHELM CAMILL LINSS (LSTC) Professor of New Testament 

B.D. (equiv.). University of Erlangen; Th.D., Boston University School of 
Theology; Study, University of Munster; University of Michigan. 

LOWELL W. LIVEZEY (CCTS) Executive Director, World Without War Coun- 
cil — Midwest 

B.A., University of Keele, Staffordshire; M.Th., D.Min., University of Chi- 
cago. 

NICHOLAS LOHKAMP, O.F.M. (CTU) Visiting Professor of Ethics (Professor of 
Ethics and Dean, St. Leonard College) 
B.A., Duns Scotus College; S.T.L., S.T.D., Catholic University of America. 

HELMUT H. LOISKANDL, S.V.D. (CTU) Visiting Professor of Anthropology 
(Associate Professor of Sociology, DePaul University) 
M.A., University of Vienna; Ph.D., University of Munich. 

JOEL WALDEMAR LUNDEEN (LSTC) Archivist 

A.B., Augustana College; B.D., Augustana Theological Seminary; M.A., 

University of Chicago. 
ELDA MAASE (NBTS) Instructor in Christian Education 

B.A., Incarnate Word College; M.A., Trinity University; Ed.D., University of 

Maryland; Study, Cambridge Institute of Education, England; Bowling Green 

State University. 
SEBASTIAN MacDONALD, C.P. (CTU) Professor of Ethics 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; S.T.L., S.T.D., University of 

St. Thomas, Rome; Study, Princeton University. 
WILLIAM O. MADDEN, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Historical Theology 

A.B., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; 

H.E.L., H.E.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. (Academic leave, 

1974-76). 
EUGENE A. MAINELLI, O.P. (CTU) Lecturer in Religious Education; (JSTC) 

Coordinator, Ministerial Program; (CCTS) Supervisor, Center for Studies in 

Religious Education 

B.A., Aquinas Institute; M.A., Aquinas Institute School of Theology; D.Min., 

Chicago Theological Seminary. 
ROBERT W. MALLONEE, S.V.D. (CTU) Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care 

B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.A.L.S., 

Rosary College; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary. 

96 



EDWARD J. MALLY, SJ. (JSTC) Visiting Associate Professor of New Testament 

A.B., Ph.L., Bellarmine College, Plattsburgh; M.A., Fordham University; 

S.T.L., Woodstock College; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome. 
CLYDE L. MANSCHRECK (CTS) Professor of Church History and Director, Cen- 
ter for Reformation and Free Church Studies 

B.A., George Washington University; B.D., Garrett Theological Seminary; 

M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Yale University. 
RANDALL MASON (CTS) Adjunct Faculty (Director, Center for ReUgion and 

Psychotherapy of Chicago) 

B.A., B.D., Duke University; S.T.M., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 

Washington University. 
JAMES C. MAY (NBTS) Instructor in Black Studies and Urban Church (Pastor, 

Woodlaivn Baptist Church, Chicago) 

B.A., Northern Baptist Theological College; M.R.E., M.Div., Northern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary. 
JOHN-DANIEL P. MENDES (CCTS) Director, Department of Hospital Education, 

Illinois Central Community Hospital 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.S. (Nursing), University of California, San 

Francisco Medical Center; M.S. (Nursing Education), Ed.D., Christian Uni- 
versity of Ohio. 
ROBERT P. MEYE (NBTS) Professor of Biblical Theology and Dean 

B.A., Stanford University; B.D., Th.M., Fuller Theological Seminary; D. 

TheoL, University of Basel. (Sabbatical, Winter and Spring Quarters). 
J. ROBERT MEYNERS (CTS) Associate Professor of Theology and Urban Culture 

B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; Th.D., Union Theological Seminary; 

Study, University of Redlands. 
WALTER LUDWIG MICHEL (LSTC) Assistant Professor of Old Testament 

B.D. (equiv.). University of Vienna; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; 

Study, University of Heidelberg; Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; 

Western Michigan University; Yale University. 
DONALD E. MILLER (BTS) Professor of Christian Education and Ethics 

M.A., University of Chicago; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 

Harvard University. (Sabbatical, Fall and Winter Quarters). 
OSCAR J. MILLER, CM. (DeAn) Communications, Homiletics 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.A., Northwestern University. 
MICHAEL MONTAGUE, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Historical Theology 

and Director of Continuing Education 

A.B., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; 

Ph.D., St. Louis University. 

LEWIS S. MUDGE (MTS) Professor of Theology and Dean of the Seminary 

B.A., Princeton University; B.A., M.A., Oxford University; B.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton University. 

KENNETH V. MULL (NBTS) Instructor in Biblical Studies and Christian Educa- 
tion (Professor of Religion and Archaeology, Aurora College) 
B.A., Cascade College; M.A., University of Minnesota; M.Div., Garrett- 
Ev angelical Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

ROBERT E. MURRAY, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Moral Theology 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; S.T.D., 
Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. (Academic leave, 1974-76). 



97 



J. GORDON MYERS, S.J. (JSTC) Coordinator, Ministerial Team and Adjunct 
Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology 

B.S., B.A., Xavier University, Cincinnati; M.Div., Regis College, Willow- 
dale; M.R.Ed., Loyola University, Chicago; Study, National Training Labora- 
tory; Center for the Study of the Person, La Jolla; Human Development Train- 
ing Institute, San Diego. 

WILLIAM R. MYERS (MTS) Lecturer in Christian Education (Assistant Pastor, 
Flossmoor Community Church, Flossmoor) 

B.A., Westminster College; M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; M.Ed. 
(Counseling), Rhode Island College. 

WILLIAM R. MYERS (NETS) President 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
D.D., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary; Study, Union Theological 
Seminary; Princeton Theological Seminary. 

ROBERT W. NEFF (BTS) Professor of Biblical Studies 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., 
Yale University; Study, Cambridge University. 

F. BURTON NELSON Professor of Theology and Ethics, North Park Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Brown University; B.D., Yale University Divinity School; Ph.D., North- 
western University and Garrett Theological Seminary; Study, North Park 
Theological Seminary. 

JAMES S. NELSON (NBTS) Instructor in Systematic Theology (Associate Pro- 
fessor of Religion and Philosophy, North Park College) 

B.A., Bethel College; B.D., Bethel Seminary; Th.D., King's College, University 
of Aberdeen. 

LAWRENCE NEMER, S.V.D. (CTU) Associate Professor of Church History 

B.A., Divine Word Seminary, Techny; L.Miss., Pontifical Gregorian Univer- 
sity, Rome; M.A. (History), Catholic University of America; Ph.D. (Cand.), 
Cambridge University. (On leave for doctoral studies. Fall Quarter). 

THOMAS MORE NEWBOLD, C.P. (CTU) Professor of Pastoral Theology 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; Maitre-es-Sc-Med., L'Institut 
d'Etude Medieval d'Albert le Grand; Ph.D., University of Montreal. (Sabbati- 
cal, Fall Quarter). 

MORRIS JEROME NIEDENTHAL (LSTC) Associate Professor of Functional The- 
ology 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.Div., Chicago Lutheran Theological Semi- 
nary; Th.D., Union Theological Seminary; Fulbright Scholar, Manchester 
University, England. (Sabbatical, Spring Quarter). 

NELS LeROY NORQUIST (LSTC) Associate Professor of New Testament 

A.B., Augustana College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Wittenberg University; Ph.D., Hartford Seminary Foundation; Study, Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary. 

JOHN J. O'CALLAGHAN, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Moral Theology 
A.B., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; 
S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 

JAMES I. O'CONNOR, S.J. (JSTC) Professor Emeritus of Pastoral Care and Spiri- 
tuality 

Litt.B., M.A., Xavier University; Ph.L., S.T.L. West Baden College; J.C.B., 
Catholic University of America; J.C.L., J. CD., Pontifical Gregorian Univer- 
sity, Rome. 



98 



ERIC H. OHLMANN (NBTS) Assistant Professor of Church History 

B.A., University of Alberta; B.D., North American Baptist Seminary; Th.M., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.D., Graduate Theological Union; 
Study, Predigerseminar, Hamburg. 

KENNETH O'MALLEY, C.P. (CTU) Director of Library 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D. (Cand.), University of Illinois; 
Study, University of Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; St. Louis Univer- 
sity; Spalding College. 

GILBERT OSTDIEK, O.F.M. (CTU) Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
and Dean 

B.A., Quincy College; S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum Antoni- 
anum, Rome; Study, Harvard Divinity School. 

THOMAS D. PARKER (MTS) Professor of Systematic Theology 

B.A., Los Angeles State College; B.D., San Francisco Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; Study, University of Munich. 

JOHN PAUL, M.S.C. (CTU) Dean of Students 

S.T.L., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; J. CD., Catholic University of 
America. 

JOHN T. PAWLIKOWSKI, O.S.M., (CTU) Associate Professor of Ethics and 
Acting President 
A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

HAYIM GOREN PERELMUTER (CTU) Chautauqua Professor of Jewish Studies 
B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L., Jewish Institute of Religion, New 
York; D.H.L. (Cand.), Hebrew Union College—Hebrew University; D.D., 
Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati. 

ALBERT E. PERO (LSTC) Instructor in Christian Education and Constructive 
Theology; (BTS, DeAn) Visiting Lecturer in Christian Education; (CTS) Ad- 
junct Faculty; (CTU) Lecturer in Constructive Theology; (CCTS) Black Studies 
Coordinator 

B.Th., Concordia Theological Seminary, Springfield; S.T.D., Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago. 

NICHOLAS E. PERSICH, CM. (DeAn) Systematic Theology and Academic Dean 
B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; S.T.L., S.T.D., University of St. 
Thomas, Rome. 

HENRY J. PIACITELLI, CM. (DeAn) Pastoral and Field Education (Director^ 
Department of Pastoral Care, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago) 
B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.A., CathoHc University of America; 
S.T.M., University of Dubuque. 

RICHARD P. POETHIG (MTS) Lecturer in Church and Industrial Society and Di- 
rector, Institute on the Church and Urban-Industrial Society 
B.A., College of Wooster; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary; Study, 
Ateneo University of Manila; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

MARCUS J. PRIESTER (MTS) Professor of Christian Education 

B.A., D.D., Grove City College; S.T.B., S.T.M., Western Theological Semi- 
nary; Th.D., University of Toronto; Study, Clarion State Teachers College. 

ANN B. RATHBUN (CTS) Director of Clinical Studies 

Study, University of Denver; Church Divinity School of the Pacific. 

JEROME W. RAUSCH, O.S.C (CTU) Acting Director of M.A. Program 

S.T.D., University of St. Thomas, Rome; Eleve Titulaire, Ecole Biblique, Jeru- 
salem; Study, University of Notre Dame. 

DAVID C REEVES (MTS) Associate Professor of New Testament 

B.A., Occidental College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard 
University; Study, University of Gottingen. 

99 



V. BRUCE RIGDON (MTS) Professor of Church History 

B.A., College of Wooster; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., Yale 
University; Study, Oxford University. 

PAUL V. ROBB, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care and Spirituality 
(Director, Institute for Spiritual Leadership) 

Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Loyola University, Chicago. 

PAUL M. ROBINSON (BTS) Professor of Practical Theology and President 

Th.B., Princeton Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Lutheran Theological Semi- 
nary, Mount Airy; D.D., Juniata College; LL.D., Bridgewater College. 

CHARLES SHELBY ROOKS (CTS) Associate Professor of Ministry and President 
B.A., Virginia State College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; D.D., College 
of Wooster; Study, Columbia University; Oxford University. 

THEODORE C. ROSS, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Historical Theology 
Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., West Baden College; M.A. (History), M.A. 
(Theology), Loyola University, Chicago; S.T.L., Bellarmine School of The- 
ology. 

BYRON P. ROYER (BTS) Professor of Pastoral Psychology 

B.S., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; M.A., North- 
western University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

GARY R. SATTLER (NBTS) Instructor in Christian Education (Director, Co- 
operative Outreach Program to Youth, Glen Ellyn) 

B.A., Midland College; M.Div., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
■Study, McCormick Theological Seminary. 

THOMAS A. SCHAFER (MTS) Professor of Church History 

B.A., Maryville College; B.D., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Duke University. 

JAMES ARNOLD SCHERER (LSTC) Professor of Missions 

A.B., Yale University; B.D., Th.D., Union Theological Seminary; Study, 
Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; Columbia University; International 
Christian University, Japan; Oxford University. 

J. PETER SCHINELLER, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Fundamental Theology 
A.B., M.A., Fordham University; Ph.L., B.D., Woodstock College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

CALVIN H. SCHMITT (MTS) Professor of Bibliography 

B.A., University of Dubuque; M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary; 
Litt.D., Alma College; Study, University of New Mexico; Union Theological 
Seminary; Columbia University. 

CARL D. SCHNEIDER (M/L) Assistant Professor of Religion and Personality 
B.A., Albright College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard 
University. 

HARRY B. SCHOLEFIELD (M/L) Minister-in-Residence and Visiting lecturer 
(Minister Emeritus, First Unitarian Society, San Francisco) 

A.B., Bowdoin College; S.T.B., Harvard University; D.D., Meadville/Lom- 
bard Theological School; S.T.D., Starr King School for the Ministry; Study, 
Philadelphia Psychoanalytic Institute. 

ROBERT J. SCHREITER, C.PP.S. (CTU) Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theol- 
ogy 
B.A., St. Joseph's College; Th.Drs., Katholieke Universiteit, Nijmegen. 



100 



W. WIDICK SCHROEDER (CTS) Professor of Religion and Society 

B.A., Bethel College; M.A., Michigan State University; B.D., Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

ROBERT C. SCHULTZ (DeAn) Psychology (Director of Field Education, Lutheran 
Theological Southern Seminary) 

B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; Dr.Theol., Friedrich Alexander 
University, Erlangen; Study, Harvard Divinity School; Menninger Foundation. 

ROBIN J. SCROGGS (CTS) Professor of New Testament and Acting Dean (Fall, 
1975) 

B.A., B.Mus., University of North Carolina; B.D., Duke University; Ph.D., 
Princeton University. 

ROBERT T. SEARS, S.J. (JSTC) Assistant Professor of Fundamental Theology 
A.B., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., West Baden College; S.T.L., 
Sankt Georgen, Frankfurt; Ph.D., Fordham University. 

DONALD SENIOR, C.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor of New Testament Studies 
B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; Bacculareate en Theologie, 
S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain, Belgium. 

JAMES K. SERRICK, S.J. (JSTC) Instructor in Pastoral Care and Spirituality 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; M.A., 
University of Notre Dame; Study, Pontificio Ateneo S. Anselmo, Rome. (Sab- 
batical, Spring Quarter) 

NEIL H. SHADLE (M/L) Assistant Professor of Field Education 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; B.D., Meadville Theological School. 

FRANKLIN EUGENE SHERMAN (LSTC) Professor of Christian Ethics and Direc- 
tor of Graduate Studies 

A.B., Muhlenberg College; M.Div., Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Oxford University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. (Sabbatical, 
1975-76). 

GRAYDON F. SNYDER (BTS) Professor of Biblical Literature 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Study, Cambridge University. 

MARTHA SNYDER (CTS) Clinical Instructor; Director, CTS Nursery School 
B.A., Ohio State University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

ROSS SNYDER (CTS) Professor of Religious Education 

B.A., Ohio State University; M.A., Boston University; Ed.D., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University. 

ALPHONSE SPILLY, C.PP.S. (CTU) Instructor in New Testament Studies 
B.A., M.A., University of Dayton; Ph.D. (Cand.), University of Chicago. 

MARGARET H. STEARN (CCTS) Minister, University Church of Disciples of 
Christ and Co-Director, Porter Foundation, University of Chicago 
B.A., University of New Hampshire; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary; 
Study, St. John's University, New York. 

JOHN W. STETTNER (MTS) Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 

B.A., Ohio State University; B.D., Yale Divinity School; M.A., University 
of Chicago; Th.D., Iliff School of Theology; Study, Jung Institute, Zurich. 

JACK L. STOTTS (MTS) Professor of Christian Ethics and President 

B.A., Trinity University; B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., Yale University; Study, Oxford University. 

CARROLL STUHLMUELLER, C.P. (CTU) Professor of Old Testament Studies 
B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; S.T.L., S.S.L., S.S.D., Pontifi- 
cal Biblical Institute, Rome; D.H.L., St. Benedict College. 

101 



PAUL REGINALD SWANSON (LSTC) Professor of Pastoral Care 

A.B., Augustana College; M.Div., Augustana Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Andover Newton Theological School; Ph.D., Boston University. 

RICHARD RUDOLPH SYRE (LSTC) Professor of Old Testament 

A.B., University of Vienna; S.T.B., New York Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg; Ph.D., University of Nebraska; 
Litt.D., Midland Lutheran College; Study, Princeton Theological Seminary. 

TYLER THOMPSON Professor of Philosophy of Religion, Carre tt-Ev angelical 
Theological Seminary 

B.S., California Institute of Technology; S.T.B., Boston University School of 
Theology; Ph.D., Boston University. 

WILLIAM G. THOMPSON, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Biblical Theology 
A.B., M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., West Baden College; 
S.S.L., S.S.D., Pontificio Istituto Biblico. 

ROBERT IRA TOBIAS (LSTC) Associate Professor of Ecumenics and Director of 
Doctor of Ministry Program and of Continuing Education 

A.B., Phillips University; M.A., Graduate School of Theology, Phillips Univer- 
sity; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Th.D., University of Geneva and 
Graduate School of Ecumenical Studies. 

MARJORIE TUITE, O.P. (JSTC) Coordinator, Ministerial Program 

A.B., Ohio Dominican College; M.A., Fordham University; M.A., Manhattan 
College. 

LARRY K. ULRICH (BTS, CTS) Adjunct Faculty (Associate Professor of Religion 
and Medicine, Rush Medical College and Director of Pastoral Administration, 
Department of Pastoral Care arid Education, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's 
Medical Center) 

B.A., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
Chicago Theological Seminary. 

ROMAN VANASSE, O.Praem. (CTU) Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
and Director of M.A. Program 

B.A., St. Norbert College; S.T.L., S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome; Study, Oriental Institute, University of Chicago; Pontifical Biblical 
Institute, Rome. (Sabbatical 1975-76). 

DENNIS H. VANLIER, S.J. (JSTC) Lecturer in Pastoral Care and Spirituality 
Ph.L., Berchmanianum, Nijmegen; M.A. (equiv.). University of Amsterdam; 
S.T.L., Canisianum, Maastricht; S.T.M., D.Min., Andover-Newton Theologi- 
cal School. 

ARTHUR VOOBUS (LSTC) Professor of New Testament and Church History 
Cand. TheoL, Mag. Theol., Dr. Theol., University of Tartu, Estonia. 

MURRAY L. WAGNER (BTS) Librarian and Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Th.D., Chi- 
cago Theological Seminary. 

MICHAEL F. WALSH, CM. (DeAn) New Testament 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Perryville; M.A., Catholic University of America; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome. 

PEGGY WAY (JSTC) Coordinator, Ministerial Program 

A.B., University of Michigan; B.D., University of Chicago; M.S.W., Wayne 
State University; D.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; Ph.D. (Cand.), Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary. 



102 



JARED WICKS, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Historical Theology 

Litt.B., Xavier University; M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.L., S.T.L., 
West Baden College; Dr. Theol., University of Munster. (Academic leave, 
1975-78; Associate Professor of Theology, Wau Major Seminary, Republic of 
the Sudan.) 

DAVID J. WIEAND (BTS) Professor of Biblical Literature and Director of Con- 
tinuing Education 

B.A., Juniata College; M.A., New York University; B.D., Bethany Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study, Chicago Institute of Psycho- 
analysis; National Training Laboratory; National Protestant Laboratory, 
Green Lake; American School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem; Northeast 
Career Center, Princeton; Brook Lane Psychiatric Center, Hagerstown. 

DONALD FOSTER WILLIAMS (CCTS) Acting Executive Coordinator 

B.A., Baylor University; M.R.E., New York Theological Seminary; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., New York University; Study, Trinity 
University; University of Southern California. 

JEAN STARR WILLIAMS (M/L) Lecturer in Religious Education (Minister of 
Religious Education, First Unitarian Church, Chicago) 

B.A., Transylvania University; M.A., Chicago Theological Seminary; M.S., 
Purdue University; Study, University of California, Long Beach. 

WALTER P. WOLBRECHT (LSTC) President 

B.A. (equiv.), Concordia College, Milwaukee; B.D. (equiv.), Concordia Semi- 
nary, St. Louis; M.A., University of Nebraska; D.D., Concordia Theological 
Seminary, Springfield; LL.D., Augustana College, Rock Island; Study, Univer- 
sity of Chicago; Marquette University; Municipal University of Omaha; Uni- 
versity of Nebraska. 

ROBERT C. WORLEY (MTS) Professor of Education and Ministry and Director 
of Doctor of Ministry Program 

B.A., Oklahoma State University; D.D.S., M.S., Northwestern University; 
B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia University. 

JEREMIAH A. WRIGHT (CCTS) Pastor, Trinity United Church of Christ, Chicago 
B.A., M.A. (English), Howard University; M.A. (Theology), Ph.D. (Cand.), 
University of Chicago. 

JOSEPH F. WULFTANGE, S.J. (JSTC) Associate Professor of Fundamental The- 
ology 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; M.S., St. Louis University; Ph.L., S.T.L., 
West Baden College; M.S., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Pontifical Gregor- 
ian University, Rome. 

HYANG SOOK CHUNG YOON (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

A.B., M.A., Seoul National University; M.L.S., University of Texas, Austin. 

WARREN CAMERON YOUNG (NBTS) Professor of Theology and Christian 
Philosophy 

A.B., Gordon College; M.A., Ph.D., Boston University; Study, University 
of Heidleberg; University of Basel. 

BARBARA BROWN ZIKMUND (CTS) Assistant Professor of Church History and 
Director of Studies 
B.A., Beloit College; B.D., Ph.D., Duke University. 

103 



LIBRARIANS 

LOWELL CHARLES ALBEE, Jr. (LSTC) Librarian; (Jesuit/Lutheran/McCormick 
Libraries) Coordinator of Readers Services 

A.B., Upsala College; B.D., Augustana Theological Seminary; M.S., Simmons 
College, School of Library Science; Study, And over-Newton Theological 
School. 

JOAN BLOCHER (CTS) Assistant Librarian 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

FORREST S. CLARK (NBTS) Librarian; (Bethany /Northern Baptist Library) 
Director of Instructional Services 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State University; M.S.L.S., University of North Caro- 
lina. 

JANET DAVIDSON (MTS) Religious Education Librarian 

B.A., Millikin College; M.A.R.E., McCormick Theological Seminary. 

ARLENE M. FEINER (JSTC) Librarian; (Jesuit/Lutheran/McCormick Libraries) 
Coordinator of Periodical Collection 
B.A., Alverno College; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

NEIL GERDES (M/L) Librarian 

A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard University; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity; M.A., University of Chicago. 

FRANCIS GERMOVNIK, CM. (DeAn) Librarian 

B.A., University of Ljubljana, Yugoslavia; M.A.L.S., Rosary College; J.C.L., 
J. CD., University of St. Thomas, Rome. 

MYRON GOHMANN, CP. (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

L.Hist.E., Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

ANNE A. HAHN (CTU) Acquisitions and Catalog Librarian 

A.B., Kirkland College; M.L.S., College of Librarianship, University of South 
Carolina. 

EARLE HILGERT (Jesuit/Lutheran/McCormick Libraries) Coordinator of Col- 
lection Development 

A.B., Walla Walla College; B.D., Adventist Theological Seminary; M.A., 
University of Chicago; D.Th., University of Basel. 

ELVIRE HILGERT (MTS) Assistant Librarian; (Jesuit/Lutheran/McCormick 
Libraries) Coordinator of Technical Services 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.L.S., Catholic University of America; Study, 
Adventist Theological Seminary; University of the Philippines, Manila; Uni- 
versity of Basel. 

ALBERT E. HURD (CTS) Librarian; (CCTS) Library Coordinator 

A.B., Michigan State University; B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary; M.A. 
(Cand.), University of Chicago. 

ELINOR C JOHNSON (LSTC) Associate Librarian 

A.B., Augustana College; M.A., University of Chicago. 

JUDY KNOP (Jesuit/Lutheran/McCormick Libraries) Catalog Librarian 
A.B., Park College; M.A. (Cand.), University of Chicago. 

JOEL W. LUNDEEN (LSTC) Archivist 

A.B., Augustana College; B.D., Augustana Theological Seminary; M.A., 
University of Chicago. 



104 



KENNETH O'MALLEY, C.P. (CTU) Director of Library 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D. (Cand.), University of Illinois; 

Study, University of Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; St. Louis Univer- 
sity; Spalding College. 
VERA LOUISE ROBINSON (Bethany/Northern Baptist Library) Catalog Librarian 

A.B., Westmar College; M.A., University of Chicago. 
CALVIN H. SCHMITT (MTS) Librarian; (Jesuit/Lutheran/McCormick Libraries) 

General Director 

A.B., University of Dubuque; M.Div., McCormick Theological Seminary; 

Litt.D., Alma College; Study, University of New Mexico; Union Theological 

Seminary; Columbia University. 
MURRAY L. WAGNER (BTS) Librarian; (Bethany/Northern Baptist Library) 

Director of Technical Services 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary; Th.D., Chi- 
cago Theological Seminary. 
MARIAN WIEGEL, R.S.M. (JSTC) Assistant Librarian 

B.Ed., St. Xavier College; M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 
HYANG SOOK CHUNG YOON (CTU) Associate Director of Library 

A.B., M.A., Seoul National University; M.L.S., University of Texas, Austin. 



105 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CLUSTER LIBRARY SERVICES 

The Cluster supports a vigorous library program which provides many benefits 
to students and faculty. The combined Cluster library collections comprise over 
775,000 volumes and represent one of the largest collections among theological 
consortia in the nation. A Union List of 1600 current periodicals assist Cluster 
library users in locating desired titles, and all Cluster library users have access to 
the Cluster Union Catalog of holdings acquired since July 1972, which is located 
at the Jesuit/Lutheran/McCormick Libraries. The loan of books or periodicals be- 
tween Cluster schools is facilitated by the use of an interlibrary teletype and cour- 
ier system, and direct access to all Cluster libraries is provided by a Cluster I.D. 
card. A staff of twenty library professionals with various subject specializations 
is available to assist users with reference and research problems. The Cluster 
libraries have uniform policies for loan periods, care of reserve books, reference 
books, periodicals and costs for photocopying. 

Other Cluster library cooperative programs that benefit users are a coordinated 
joint acquisitions program for books, periodicals, and monograph series. A joint 
acquisitions list - Current Acquisitions for Theological Education - is published 
six times a year. 

Beyond the Cluster library resources are those of other Chicago seminaries 
and universities, the Chicago Public Library, Newberry Library, and John Crerar 
Library. 

Each Cluster library has its special subject strengths or collections. Below is a 
brief description of the kinds of special holdings to be found in the Cluster: 
* Bethany Theological Seminary: Special strengths in Brethren history. Pietism, 
peace studes, and psychological journals. Special collections are the Abraham H. 
Cassell Collection of 19th century historical and theological books and pamphlets, 
and the Huston Bible Collection, which represents over four hundred volumes with 
numerous editions of the English Bible. 

Catholic Theological Union: Special collection strength in the subjects of Scrip- 
ture, patrology, canon law, and missiology. 

Chicago Theological Seminary: Collection strength in ethics, sociology of religion, 
psychology and personality sciences. Special collections are in Congregational 
and Puritan studies and Hebraica. 

DeAndreis Seminary: Collection strength in Vincentiana, Scripture and Catholic 
church history. 

+ Jesuit School of Theology: Special collection strengths in Jesuistica, modern and 
contemporary continental philosophy, patristics, medieval scholastic theology and 
Catholic systematic theology. 

+ Lutheran School of Theology: Collection strength in church history, theology, 
Lutheran Orthodoxy, Pietism, and recent continental theology. Special collec- 
tions of published and unpublished materials related to the history of the Lutheran 
Church in America, United Lutheran Church, Augustana Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, American Evangelical Lutheran Church (Danish), and the Finnish Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church (Suomi Synod). Gruber Collection of Greek MSS from 
the 9th-15th centuries; early editions of German and English Bibles. 

106 



+ McCormick Theological Seminary: Collection strength in biblical studies includ- 
ing biblical archaeology. Reformation, patristics, and Evans American Biblio- 
graphy in mocroprint. Special collections include Presbyteriana and the Condit 
and Simms English Bible Collections. 

Mead ville /Lombard Theological School: Collection strengths in Unitarian materi- 
als, social ethics and history of religions. 

* Northern Baptist Theological Seminary: Collection strengths in Baptist history. 
Special collections consist of Baptist Association records, American Baptist Con- 
vention records, Danish and Norwegian Baptist Seminary material; A. T. Olm- 
stead Collection in Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Literature. 

* The libraries of Bethany and Northern Baptist will be combined into a joint li- 
brary with integrated staffs and collections on the Bethany campus by September 
1975. The new joint library will be known as The Library of Bethany and North- 
ern Baptist Theological Seminaries: A Combined Learning Resource Center. 

+ The library of McCormick will be combined with the Jesuit and Lutheran li- 
braries into a joint library with integrated staffs and collections on the Lutheran 
campus by September 1975. The new joint library will be known as The Jesuit/ 
Lutheran/McCormick Libraries. 

CLUSTER WORLD MISSION INSTITUTE 

The sixth annual Cluster World Mission Institute will be held April 4-10, 1976. 
With ecumenical and international leadership, the Institute brings together stu- 
dents, missionaries, pastors, administrators, and scholars to identify and propose 
solutions for problems and concerns that are of transcultural and international 
import. 

Institute topics in recent years have included The Role of the Missionary, Mis- 
sion in One World, and Evangelization and Human Development in the Third 
World. A list of available publications, manuscripts, and cassette tapes related to 
previous Institutes may be obtained from the Cluster office. 

The Cluster International Programs Committee, assisted by the Cluster Inter- 
national Programs Coordinator, is engaged in selecting the topic and designing 
the program for the Institute in 1976. Announcement of full particulars will be 
made upon their availability. 

The Cluster World Mission Institute is an integral component in the network 
of resources available to assist persons to understand the mission and ministry of 
the church in global perspective and to communicate Christian faith in cultures 
and subcultures other than their own. As such, the Institute complements the 
Cluster Area of Concentration in Cross-Cultural Communication; the regular 
World Mission Studies course offerings; and various special programs planned by, 
with, and for international students and visiting faculty and lecturers from other 
nations. 

CLUSTER THEOLOGICAL LANGUAGE COURSES 

In addition to the courses in biblical languages listed among the regular course 
offerings, non-credit courses in French, German and Latin are offered through the 
Cluster during the Winter quarter and during such other quarters as may be war- 
ranted by the level of student interest. The aim of the courses is to assist students 
to achieve facility in reading theological literature in the respective languages. Such 

107 



facility is frequently employed to fulfill language requirements for certain degree 
programs. A nominal fee is charged. For further infonnation contact the Cluster 
office. 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE 

The Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science (CASIRAS) is an inde- 
pendent incorporated institution with an Advisory Board comprised of approxi- 
mately one hundred internationally reknowned scholars and scientists representing 
all major disciplines of scientific inquiry. Since 1970, CASIRAS has developed 
an increasingly close affiliation and effective working relationship with the Chi- 
cago Cluster of Theological Schools. 

The purposes of such cooperative realtionship are (1) to achieve greater inte- 
gration of scientific views of the nature of persons and their world with the con- 
victions by which persons make their fundamental decisions ~ thereby to revitalize 
and universalize the long-evolved wisdom and power inherent in the religious 
dimension of culture ~ and (2) to enrich the education of persons preparing for 
and engaged in ministry by enabling them to participate in the processes of inves- 
tigation and reflection through which such integration and revitalization may be 
realized. The involvement of CASIRAS in the following endeavors reflects such 
purposes : 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and the Sciences. The seminar was begun at 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School in 1965 under the direction of Ralph Wen- 
dell Burhoe, and is one of the precursors of Cluster faculty and student involve- 
ment in an interinstitutional and interdisciplinary research and development pro- 
ject. The seminar and related conferences have provided Cluster personnel with 
opportunities for small-group discussion of new insights from the sciences for un- 
derstanding human nature and destiny with such internationally distinguished 
scientists (including some Nobel Prize winners) as: H. Stanley Bennett, David 
Bidney, J. Bronowski, Sanborn C. Brown, Donald T. Campbell, Theodosius Dob- 
zhansky, Alfred E. Emerson, Sir John Eccles, Clifford Geertz, Benson E. Ginsburg, 
Garrett Hardin, Sir Alister Hardy, Hudson Hoagland, Dwight J. Ingle, Aharon 
Katchalsky-Katzir, Kirtley F. Mather, Hermann Joseph Muller, Michael Polanyi, 
Van Rensselaer Potter, C. L. Prosser, Harlow Shapley, Sol Tax, George Wald, 
and Anthony F. C. Wallace. Many of the papers shared by such scholars in the 
context of the seminar have been published in Zygon or elsewhere and represent 
keys to new breakthroughs of the wall separating religious and scientific under- 
standing. Local and other theological faculty have also employed the seminar as 
a forum for presenting outstanding papers which foster pioneering understandings 
of a more positive relation of religion and science and which, upon publication, 
constitute a growing literature for such breakthroughs. A description of the cur- 
rent seminar offering, CCTS 572: Advanced Seminar in Theology and the Sci- 
ences, may be found on p. 26. 

Fellows and Associates. A limited number of theologians and scientists from 
local as well as from West and East Coast institutions have been appointed Fel- 
lows and Associates of CASIRAS, sometimes for a sabbatical year, where they 
have written papers and books with the benefit and guidance and critical review 
by others associated with the Center. Several ministers have also come to 



108 



CASIRAS as Associates for extended periods of continuing education. Their read- 
ings and discussions have similarly led to significant papers in the field, some of 
which have been published. 

Courses. From its inception CASIRAS has provided team-taught courses for 
Cluster students pursuing basic professional degrees. In 1970-71 the Center pio- 
neered in organizing the Cluster's first year-long sequence, "Man and His Environ- 
ment," which involved 12 faculty from 5 seminaries and an ecologist from a neigh- 
boring university, together with some 20 students from 5 schools. Other inter- 
institutionally team-taught courses have followed, and a description of the cur- 
rent offering, CCTS 472 : Communicating the Gospel in an Age of Science, may be 
found on p. 26. 

In addition to offering courses on the basic professional degree level, CASIRAS 
has been involved in thesis advising for advanced academic degrees. Moreover, 
from the outset CASIRAS has participated with faculties of Cluster schools in 
academic planning, including the development (1) of professional degree program 
course offering oudines for students preparing for ministry and for clergy engaged 
in continuing education; (2) of academic doctoral programs for future teachers 
and researchers; and (3) of postdoctoral programs for faculty. 

Conferences and Symposia. For many years CASIRAS, together with its af- 
filiated membership society, the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science (IRAS), 
has organized conferences and symposia on religion and the sciences. Among the 
more recent of such endeavors is a conference generated by four members of local 
theological faculties under the chairmanship of Philip Hefner of the Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago. Dealing with "The Human Prospect: Heilbroner's 
Challenge to Religon and Science," certain of the conference papers are published 
in Zygon (September, 1975). Many less formal discussions, including occasional 
ad hoc gatherings with unusually creative leaders in the field who are visiting in 
the Chicago area have also been arranged for students and faculty of the Cluster. 

Publishing. CASIRAS and IRAS are the joint publishers of Zygon, Journal 
of Religion and Science, edited by Ralph W. Burhoe. The journal has been pub- 
lished at the University of Chicago Press since 1966; its editorial offices are housed 
with the Cluster. Communications from religious and scientific personnel indicate 
that this journal, whose back-issue sales have been highest among the 33 jour- 
nals of the University Press, constitutes an unusually valuable resource for those 
concerned with the new thrust to vitalize the religious message by rejoining reli- 
gious and scientific knowledge. 

Guided Research and Study. CASIRAS makes available through the Cluster 
opportunities which are unique among American theological schools for guided 
research and study in the area of theology and the sciences. 

For further information contact Dr. Ralph Wendell Burhoe, Director, Center 
for Advanced Studies in Religion and Science, 1100 East 55th Street, Chicago, 
Illinois 60615. Phone: (312) 667-3500. 

CENTER FOR STUDIES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 
Programs for Parish and Educational Ministry 

The Center for Studies in Religious Education (CSRE) sponsors and offers: 

• Supervised Internships in parish and educational ministry as alternates or supple- 
ments to the CPE experience; 

• Tutorials in Educational and Pastoral Ministry 

109 



• Workshops, Retreats, and Renewal Programs for Parishes and their staffs 

Center Courses 

CSRE 412 Tutorials and Guided Readings in Selected Areas 

Offered in any quarter of the academic year by arrangement with the 
Center at the regular Cluster registration periods, and with the ap- 
proval of the school of primary registration. Regular Cluster cross- 
registration procedures should be followed. Tuition $150.00. 

Center Internships 

(All Registrations by May 31 of each year for all of the following year.) 
CSRE 505 Parish Supervised Internship (PSI) Two Sessions Yearly 

An internship in a Chicago or suburban parish as a regular staff mem- 
ber, with professional supervision by the Center, and directed toward 
the full exercise of the pastoral ministry. Special emphasis given to 
the personal, spiritual, social, liturgical, interpretive, and theological 
functioning of the ministry. Skills receiving attention are preaching- 
teaching, counseling, organizational processes, ministry with adults, 
peer group and staff interaction. 

Applicants must be entering their third year of theology and/or be 
deacons. No fewer than three interns, nor more than six each session. 

Nine (9) Quarter Hours Credit, with one or two concurrent courses 
encouraged during each academic quarter. 

Two Sessions Yearly: August through December; January through 
May. 

CSRE 515 Advanced Parish Supervised Internship (APSI) Two Sessions Yearly 
Individually designed for and restricted to those who have had PSI, 
or who have had at least three years of parochial experience, or who 
are Doctor of Ministry candidates. Participants will function as as- 
sociate supervisors for PSI as well as develop with the Center their 
own program for ministerial growth. Limited to two interns each ses- 
sion. 

Nine (9) Quarter Hours Credit, with one or two concurrent courses 
encouraged during each academic quarter. 

Two Sessions Yearly: August through December; January through 

May. 

Note: Interns desiring a full year program can register for PSI and 

APSI. 

CSRE 500 Pastoral Teacher Education (PTE) Winter-Spring Only 

An internship in educational ministry with three options: 1) ADULT 
EDUCATION INTERNSHIP (AE) : developing, promoting, and exe- 
cuting models of adult education for parishes and other situations; 
2) PARISH EDUCATIONAL INTERNSHIP (PE): working with a 
parish on the total educational program in all its aspects; 3) HIGH 
SCHOOL INTERNSHIP (HS): teaching and participating in the total 
pastoral program at a parochial high school. All three options are 
directed toward the practical, critical, theological, and pastoral skills 

110 



called forth by educational ministry in all its dimensions, i.e., devel- 
oping the Christian community, designs for educational ministry, and 
ministering to the needs of others. 

Nine (9) Quarter Hours Credit, with one or two concurrent courses 
encouraged each quarter. For each option there must be no fewer 
than three interns, nor more than six. Open to all students who have 
completed one year of theological education. 

One Session Annually: January through May. 

CSRE 510 Advanced Pastoral Teacher Education (APTE) Winter-Spring Only 
An individually designed internship for those who have had PTE or 
at least three years of experience in parish or school educational min- 
istry. Entails supervisory training and specialized opportunities for 
career development. 

Nine (9) Quarter Hours Credit, with one or two concurrent courses 
encouraged each quarter. Limited to two interns. 

One Session Yearly: January through May. 

PTE and PSI include intensive ministerial involvement, log book maintenance, 
full cooperative supervision, special seminars with competent experts in various 
areas, peer and staff interaction, personal counseling, emphasis on transferability 
of skills, individualized readings, and rigorous theological pastoral reflection 
throughout the entire program. Arrangements to take PSI or PTE are made with 
the Center by May 31, and require regular cross-registration procedures. Accep- 
tance to the programs is contingent on fulfillment of all requirements, an interview 
with the Center, approval by the Center and the school of primary registration, 
and the payment of a registration fee of $100.00. If accepted, this fee is not re- 
fundable, but is included in the total tuition. Tuition for PTE or PSI and the ad- 
vanced programs is $450.00. Some schools and parishes will provide a supporting 
stipend if there is need. 

For more detailed information and descriptive brochures, write or call: Center 
for Studies in Religious Education, 1100 East 55th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60615. 
Phone: (312) 241-6992 or 324-9200. 
Paul J. Wierenga, O.P., Director Eugene A. Mainelli, O.P., Supervisor 

INSTITUTE ON THE CHURCH IN URBAN-INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY 

The Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial Society (ICUIS), based at Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary, was established in 1966 by the Presbyterian Insti- 
tute of Industrial Relations in cooperation with the Advisory Group on Urban 
and Industrial Mission, Commission on World Mission and Evangelism, World 
Council of Churches. While retaining these historic relationships, during 1975 
ICUIS has become located with the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools and 
has established relationships with a wider range of American denominations. 

The Advisory Group on Urban and Industrial Mission, W.C.C., "recognizes 
the Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial Society as the one centre mandated 
by it to provide information and consultation on training facilities for urban and 
industrial ministries as well as an international reference centre for literature and 



111 



programme information in this field." In line with this mandate ICUIS performs a 
variety of data-collecting functions. 

As a center for the gathering of information, ICUIS provides an information 
bank which draws upon a continuing flow of case studies, project reports, articles, 
correspondence, books and other materials coming out of the church's involve- 
ment in the issues of urbanization, technological change, international justice and 
human development. This material is selected, annotated, indexed and distributed 
among a world-wide network in a monthly Abstract Service and a quarterly 
Notes on Urban-Industrial Mission. Any of the more than 3,000 items in the 
ICUIS files, which are cross-indexed topically and geographically, can be retrieved 
upon request. Retrieval is facilitated by a regular Quarterly Index to the Abstract 
Service. The ICUIS information system is backed up by over 100 file drawers of 
materials on issues, projects and studies on urban-industrial mission. 

Other resources currently being organized by ICUIS are a library of over 4000 
Kodachrome slides on the church's role in the development of people world-wide 
and a switchboard for speakers and other resources for programs on the inter- 
nationalization of mission. 

Besides linking people engaged in the church's world-wide urban-industrial 
mission through information exchange, the resources of ICUIS have been used 

as models of involvement by those engaged in urban-industrial and metropolitan 
mission programs around the world; 

as teaching material by seminary and college professors in courses on church and 
society, the theology of mission, metropolitan and regional development, tech- 
nology and culture, and in continuing education and action training programs; 

as research material for students in courses or projects related to the church's 
involvement in societal issues; 

as a program resource by women's associations, couples' clubs, and young adult 
groups on issues related to the international dimensions of urbanization and 
technological change; 

as the basis for mission institutes and orientation programs for those going over- 
seas or for those returning from overseas assignments and for overseas persons 
assigned to ICUIS for periods of specialized study and action; 

as the basis for preparing bibliographies and program materials for special pro- 
gram emphases of church agencies. 

The resources of ICUIS are available to church agencies and local churches 

through the Abstract Service, and other publications of ICUIS which provide 
up-to-date information on the international dimensions of the church's 
urban-industrial mission; 

through the indexed material and the background files which provide program 
resources on the issues of metropolitan and technological change world- 
wide ; 

through consultation services to help plan institutes, seminars and conferences 
on the issues and the action involved in the internationalization of mis- 
sion; 

through orientation programs for people going overseas in the service of the 
church or of secular agencies, and week-end seminars for local 
churches. 

112 



Ministers in Industry Program 

Ministers in Industry has for many years been a consciousness-raising and 
experience-expanding summer work-seminar program aimed at putting seminary 
students in touch with Hfe in industry. During the summer of 1976, the eight- 
week program will deal with "The Blue Collar Worker in Urban America." The 
program's main purpose will be to focus students' attention on the ethos created 
by U.S. technology and the American productive system. 

Students will be employed as wage earners in factories during the day, and will 
participate in a 3-hour seminar two evenings each week. The seminar portion of 
the program will deal with the political, social, ethnic, racial, and economic at- 
titudes of the blue collar worker; with on-the-job problems; with generational 
and cultural conflicts; with the effectiveness of the trade unions in democratizing 
the industrial process; and with each of these issues as it relates to theological 
questions. 

Students will be oriented to a series of issues which will facilitate understanding 
and analysis of their own participation in the work process and which will serve 
as bases for the several seminar sessions. Content of the seminar discussions will 
be provided by observations and reflections stemming from students' respective 
work situations and by preparatory readings in which the participants will engage. 
Each participant is expected to concentrate his or her attention on a given area of 
industrial experience, as reflected in the major issues noted above, and to prepare 
a paper on this particular issue. 

The seminar sessions will be led by Prof. Poethig, who will provide an outline 
and content analysis of each issue; each student will speak to the issue which he 
or she has chosen, reflecting on what has been learned in the work experience and 
in the readings. Where needed, outside expertise will also be drawn in. 

Students should plan to begin their summer employment by June 7, 1976, or as 
soon thereafter as possible. The orientation session will be held during the week 
beginning June 7, and the final seminar will be held during the week ending August 
7. Students who desire may continue their jobs beyond the conclusion of the semi- 
nar. An optional debriefing session will be held August 27, and all papers will be 
due no later than August 31. Evaluation will be based upon seminar performance, 
the paper, and work performance (in consultation with the labor relations or per- 
sonnel department of the factory in which the student has worked). 

Enrollment is open to students who have completed one year of study at any 
accredited theological seminary. While the program is offered for 4 quarter hours 
credit, additional academic and/or clinical credit may be negotiated. Tuition for 
the program is payable to ICUIS at the rate charged by each student's home school 
for the number of credit hours sought. Applications for admission may be ob- 
tained in the office of the dean or registrar at each Cluster school or from ICUIS, 
and should be submitted to ICUIS by May 1, 1976. 

For further information, write or phone: Institute on the Church in Urban- 
Industrial Society, 5700 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637. Phone: 
(312) 241-7800. 

Richard P. Poethig, Director 

Bobbi Wells Hargleroad, Documentation Director 

Mary J. Kirklin, Administrative Assistant 



113 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE 

The Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools enjoys a cordial and fruitful work- 
ing relationship with the Chicago Theological Institute (CTI), which is a consor- 
tium of five theological schools located in the northern metropolitan area of the 
city. The member institutions of CTI are Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
(United Methodist), North Park Theological Seminary (Evangelical Covenant), 
Seabury -Western Theological Seminary (Episcopal), Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School (Evangelical Free), and St. Mary of the Lake Seminary (Roman Catholic), 
an associate member. Each of these five institutions embodies a unique theological 
tradition or denominational affiliation which complements and enriches those rep- 
resented among the nine schools of the Cluster. 

By common agreement between the two consortia students other than those 
pursuing academic doctorates in each member school enjoy tuition-free cross- 
registration privileges in all other member schools. Most Cluster students thus 
have broad functional access without additional fees to significant curricular re- 
sources in fourteen theological schools which collectively represent a richness 
and diversity of ecumenical perspectives and theological traditions unduplicated 
in any other local setting. 

The procedures for cross-registering into CTI schools are identical to those for 
cross-registering into Cluster schools. Information regarding CTI course descrip- 
tions and schedules is available in the office of the dean and registrar at each 
Cluster school. Such information may also be obtained from the office of the dean 
or registrar of the respective CTI schools : 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
2121 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, Illinois 60201 
273-2511 



St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 
Mundelein, Illinois 60060 
566-6401 



North Park Theological Seminary 

5125 North Spaulding Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60625 

583-2700 

Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

2122 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, Illinois 60201 

328-9300 



Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 
2045 Half Day Road 
Deerfield, Illinois 60015 
945-6700 



CHICAGO AREA COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 

In addition to certain informal cooperative agreements which the Chicago Clus- 
ter of Theological Schools and its member institutions enjoy with various col- 
leges and universities in the metropolitan area, one or more Cluster schools enjoy 
formal relationships with various local institutions of higher education. Through 
such relationships students at the respective seminaries enjoy correspondingly 
expanded and enriched educational offerings as well as a variety of significant 
benefits which may include participation in joint-degree programs; tuition reduc- 



114 



tion for course work; library privileges; and access to health services, cultural 
activities, and recreation facilties. 

The local colleges and universities with whom the respective Cluster schools 
enjoy such relationships are the following: 

De Paul University (DeAn) 

Loyola University (JSTC, MTS) 

University of Chicago (CTS, CTU, JSTC, LSTC, M/L, MTS) 

University of Illinois at Chicago Circle (MTS) 

George Williams College (NBTS) 

Rosary College (MTS) 

Wheaton College (NBTS) 
Full particulars on these several relationships may be obtained by consulting 
the catalogs of the respective Cluster schools. 



115 



the Chicago 
cluster of 
theological 
schools 



N 

W-|-l 



OAK BROOK 

ROOSEVELT RD 




JOHN DUFFY 
PRESERVE 



Chicago (Hyde Park) 

1 . Lutheran School of Theology at 

Chicago (Cluster Offices) 

2. Jesuit School of Theology in 

Chicago 

3. Chicago Theological Seminary 

4. Meadville/Lombard Theological 

School 

5. McCormick Theological Seminary 

6. Catholic Theological Union 

Oak, Brook 

7. Bethany Theological Seminary 

8. Northern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 

Lemont 

9. DeAndreis Seminary 



CHICAGO LOOP 

ART 

INSTITUTE 

OF CHICAGO 



SHEDD 
AQUARIUM 

ADLER 
PLANATARIUM 

MEIGS 
FIELD 

Mccormick 

PLACE